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Need some google help for a barrel.

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Replies

  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    I'll be damned. I've had 50/50 luck with indexible carbide inserts depending on what I'm boring, facing or turning. My go to was always HSS as I've found it damn near impossible to burn up an edge unless I'm doing something completely wrong. But I take you fellas word for it. Also didn't put much thought into the tool grade either. I believe I'll try a piece of stainless stock first. My threading has typically been limited to mild steel and aluminium. Thanks again fellas. You should make a YouTube video for dummies like me lol.
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Posts: 2,764 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    (snip)
    Most of the self-appointed experts who recommend a particular barrel maker have no involvement in the actual machining job of installing and headspacing the tube other than writing a check or whipping out a piece of plastic. Some of them probably couldn't tell a lathe from a mill or a surface grinder!

    Jerry

    I don't know consider myself an expert on barrels, and I specifically stated that I do not do my own gunsmithing work. So if that comment was directed at me, good job on repeating what I said.

    I also notice that until I started talking about material, contours, length, weight, twist and such, neither YOU nor anyone else was talking about it, yet the OP was asking for that information.

    I also specifically stated that my goals are very specific but that I had learned a lot about barrels. I listed several qualities for barrels and a little bit on what to look for. If I said anything that was incorrect, you certainly didn't indicate it.

    By following your reasoning, someone who does not assemble a car should not offer any opinion on various engine and transmission specifications and their effect on performance to someone who is stating he wants to build a car but doesn't know what to choose for a powertrain.

    Boy, this is complicated.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Here's my "go to" place for tooling- - - -good stock, quick shipping, and reasonable prices. I use the plain old square tool bits with brazed-on carbide tips, and grind them to whatever cut edge I need for specific turning jobs. Of course, I'm just one step beyond the stone age with manual machine tools and even replaceable-bit tooling is high tech to me! CNC equipment is downright "Star Wars" technology where I'm concerned!

    www.victornet.com

    The specific alloy of stainless is also an important consideration- - - -304 has different machining characteristics than 308, etc. so pick a practice piece that's the same alloy as the barrel you're planning to use. My son-in-law is a tool room machinist at Remington in Huntsville, and he is a far more experienced production machinist than I am. While he sets up CNC lathes and mills to produce thousands of pieces in a single production run, I'm not sure he would be able to thread, taper, and headspace a single bolt action rifle- - - -it's a totally different skill set.
    Jerry
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    Rocketman wrote: »
    I'll be damned. I've had 50/50 luck with indexible carbide inserts depending on what I'm boring, facing or turning. My go to was always HSS as I've found it damn near impossible to burn up an edge unless I'm doing something completely wrong. But I take you fellas word for it. Also didn't put much thought into the tool grade either. I believe I'll try a piece of stainless stock first. My threading has typically been limited to mild steel and aluminium. Thanks again fellas. You should make a YouTube video for dummies like me lol.

    Indexible carbide tool bits are made for specific materials. There are carbide cutters for carbon steel, cast iron, and non ferrous metals and materials. Want to screw up a good piece of carbon steel? Use a carbide insert made for cast iron to do the turning! And a cutter made for non ferrous will hose up both really quick.

    That victornet.com place Jerry linked is a good place to get tooling, and MSC Industrial Supply is another I use frequently. MSC and Enco merged recently. You can get American or foreign tooling, and they list which is which so you know where it came from, as if the price difference didn't tell you!

    You'd love my homemade cutting oil. Unsalted lard mixed with kerosene. Gives a good finish on turned or milled parts, especially on the final cut.

    If you scorch a HSS cutting tool edge, your turning speed for that material/diameter of material is either too high and/or your cutter is dull. And never turn a piece of aluminum without cleaning it first. If it has a noticeable aluminum oxide coating on it, the first pass will dull the tool bit edge. Aluminum oxide is a very aggressive abrasive on HSS and isn't good for carbide, either. The oxide coating also generates a good deal of heat while being cut. A stainless steel wool pot scrubber and vinegar, and a little elbow grease, do a good job of cleaning the oxide off.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Mike's home brew cutting lube makes me hungry- - - -once the tool bit heats up a little, the project smells like bacon frying!
    :drool2:
    Jerry
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Mike's home brew cutting lube makes me hungry- - - -once the tool bit heats up a little, the project smells like bacon frying!
    :drool2:
    Jerry

    I get hungry smelling it after a few cuts! But it works! Old gunsmith in Chattanooga put me onto that mix. The lard definitely overpowers the kerosene smell when things warm up.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Rocketman wrote: »
    Unless I have the physique of a certain governor of California. But I do not.. :jester:

    Yeah, even though some of my guns run on the heavy side, I'm not into power lifting for sport with a rifle. But, I don't mind it being a bit over what most factory rifles are. 9- 10 pounds ain't no thing to me, but then I don't hunt in the mountains or walk a long way, usually. If I do a little more walking, it would probably be with one of my factory rifles such as my old Model 70 in .270 or maybe my Rem. Mod. 700 SPS 30-06. Those two aren't heavy. They aren't light weight but they're average. Also, my Savage 110 7 Rem. Mag isn't heavy either. And there's a Model 700 ADL Syn. here that's pretty light. But all my builds are a little on the heavy side. But they're used in a blind.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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