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A special gun....

RugerFanRugerFan Senior MemberPosts: 2,295 Senior Member
One of the 1st guns I REALLY remember shooting was a Winchester Model 90A that belonged to my Grandfather. It was a pump action .22 Short(take down model too). It had been sent back to the Winchester factory around 1952 to be re-barreled and have other work done. A few years ago when I was cleaning out my grandparent's home, I found an envelope from Winchester addressed to my grandfather. Inside was a parts list, with prices, for the M90A. On the back of the envelope, in my grandfather's handwriting, is where he added up the prices of the parts he wanted replaced. If there was a letter, it has been lost. After my Grandfather died, one of my Uncle's took the gun home with him to TN. I gave the envelope and contents to my Uncle since he had the gun.

Tonight, that Uncle gave me the gun and the envelope. He said "hold it for me, until I asked for it back. But you know I won't". I had always hoped I would get that gun one day but I never really expected to. I don't think there is a bit of blueing left on the gun and the grip(?)/wrist(?) is wrapped in black electrical tape. After he gave it to me, my father said I should have it reblued. I cut my eyes at him and said No Way!. I know that being re-barreled has greatly reduced the monetary value, but the sentimental value is priceless.

He also gave me 300 rounds of .22 Shorts. This Uncle is the reason I like guns. Whenever he would visit, he'd always bring different guns he had bought and we would shoot them. He also would give me a box of shotgun shells and 2 50 rd boxes of .22's for Christmas when I was younger.

I know you gentlemen understand the way I feel receiving this gun. I feel sorry for non-gun people. I know receiving Grandpa's tools or books or something similar does have meaning. But, there's just something extra special about Grandpa's gun...........

Replies

  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    That is really awesome to get a gun that doesn't exist.

    Family heirloom or not rules is rules.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,827 Senior Member
    That one is real treasure!!
  • Hondo341Hondo341 Member Posts: 448 Member
    Oh, Ruger Fan, we need a pic of that one!
    "People are responsible to play a role in their own safety." Sheriff David Clarke 2016
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,295 Senior Member
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,096 Senior Member
    I got the OLD "Hero" single shot 12ga when my grandfather died, so I know what it's like.
    Funny thing, there's a old, handmade bolt and black electrical tape holding that stock together too.

    So I can FULLY understand the importance and value of the gun.

    I'm quite sure you're like me, even if the gun doesn't have a huge cash value, there's not enough money to get you to part with it.

    Congrats and enjoy the heirloom :beer:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,670 Senior Member
    I have one almost like that, takedown model in .22lr. Problem is, I don't know where it is! Haven't seen it for years...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • JeeperJeeper Senior Member Posts: 2,954 Senior Member
    :applause::love:

    Congrats!!! Awesome story!

    Luis
    Wielding the Hammer of Thor first requires you to lift and carry the Hammer of Thor. - Bigslug
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,696 Senior Member
    Nice pump! Some years ago I got its "cousin", a Winchester 1906 from an uncle, in a similar way you did.

    Monetary value is irrelevant since it was never high anyway and being a family gun you apparently weren't interested in selling from the beginning. Restoring it properly will be a comparatively expensive endeavor but worthwhile in my opinion since it will extend the gun serviceable life without "ruining" any alleged value (Again, if done by an expert in Winchester rifles), something a gun like this with sentimental value deserves.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    A very treasured heirloom.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,715 Senior Member
    Really cool!

    We had one of those when I was a kid
    my Grandmother used to use it to shoot starlings off her Martin house.

    Mom sold the gun.
    Shut up-----KAREN; OK Cynthia
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    Absolutely have special sentimental value that only the one it was passed down to can fully appreciate. A real treasure, indeed. :guns: :guns:
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • VarmintmistVarmintmist Senior Member Posts: 7,399 Senior Member
    Re barreling BY WINCHESTER did not reduce the value. It is still OEM.

    If it were mine, I would probably get a new stock and either redo it myself, or get it factory from Win, because the value is in the story, not the firearm. I like a nice patina so the metal would be left alone.
    It's boring, and your lack of creativity knows no bounds.
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,295 Senior Member
    Re barreling BY WINCHESTER did not reduce the value. It is still OEM.

    If it were mine, I would probably get a new stock and either redo it myself, or get it factory from Win, because the value is in the story, not the firearm. I like a nice patina so the metal would be left alone.

    I never thought that. But.......I still don't think I'll touch it. May look for a stock as a "Just in case". I know they will get harder to find as the years go by
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    Just as awesome as a keep sake. Awesome story that goes with it. I like.
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,295 Senior Member


    Did a little shooting late this afternoon. This is the 1st time I have shot this gun in 30+ yrs. I have no idea how old the ammo is. It's from a brick of Winchester Super X .22 Shorts. The front sight is quite fine, the light was fading fast, and I wear progressive lens. The distance was ~20 yards and I was leaning my elbow against the side window of my SUV' The gun is more capable than I am. I could barely hear the report while wearing ear plugs. Would love to see what this little gun can do with a proper rest.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    It just got a whole lot more special!
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,575 Senior Member
    Cool, cool, cool. I love heirlooms. And old 22s.
    Doesn't get much better than that.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,925 Senior Member
    That is awesome
    I really like old guns especially when the history behind them is known. Maybe you can write up what you know and can add it to the envelope for those behind you
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    An heirloom to be cherished and protected! Hold it in special reserve to pass on down the line to someone special some day in the future!

    I, too, have its "cousin", a little Winchester 06 that my Grandad gave to my Dad on his 11th birthday in 1921. The bluing is really worn, and it needs re-cut in the rifling, but I'll never do anything to it. Wish I knew how to post photos.....got snapshots of me with the rifle looking for Nazi soldiers in the bushes around our house when I was 4 years old!
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,295 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    That is awesome
    I really like old guns especially when the history behind them is known. Maybe you can write up what you know and can add it to the envelope for those behind you

    I do need to do that. Years ago, the Uncle who gave me the gun, wrote down the particulars on each of his guns: make, model, serial #, where he got it, the value at that time, and took a picture of it. I need to do something similar with mine. Maybe one day my grandkids( if i have any) will appreciate it.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,925 Senior Member
    RugerFan wrote: »
    I do need to do that. Years ago, the Uncle who gave me the gun, wrote down the particulars on each of his guns: make, model, serial #, where he got it, the value at that time, and took a picture of it. I need to do something similar with mine. Maybe one day my grandkids( if i have any) will appreciate it.

    Bingo, That is what we have been doing with guns that the wife inherited from her late father.

    It is kind of fun once you get started.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Antonio wrote: »
    Nice pump! Some years ago I got its "cousin", a Winchester 1906 from an uncle, in a similar way you did.

    Monetary value is irrelevant since it was never high anyway and being a family gun you apparently weren't interested in selling from the beginning. Restoring it properly will be a comparatively expensive endeavor but worthwhile in my opinion since it will extend the gun serviceable life without "ruining" any alleged value (Again, if done by an expert in Winchester rifles), something a gun like this with sentimental value deserves.

    :that:

    If done by the factory or a factory representative gun smith it is as good as the day it was originally built. Check it out. Just keep the letter stating that the work was done by Winchester and it will lose no value.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Re barreling BY WINCHESTER did not reduce the value. It is still OEM.

    If it were mine, I would probably get a new stock and either redo it myself, or get it factory from Win, because the value is in the story, not the firearm. I like a nice patina so the metal would be left alone.

    Here again! Varmintmist is right on. If done by Winchester it is still pristine. You could still if you wanted have winchester restock it and reblue it and it would go up in value not down. Just don't let any independent gun smith touch it. It has to be Winchester's work, which means a Winchester or its designated representative only.

    I'm surprised not many on here know this. When I had an FFL when someone wanted something done to an old gun without losing any value I would send it off to the respective maker's shop. They would send back the gun with the requested work done and a letter certifying it was done by the Winchester or whichever company representative gun smith did the work. Then it retained its value.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,696 Senior Member
    Does Winchester still has a refurbishing/rebuilding facility in the U.S. as Ruger does? My impression is that since under Browning administration, guns were being built by Miroku in Japan.
    Another problem if such workshop exists is that this is an outdated model, and they might carry no replacement parts for it, nor have the possibility to scratch build them for you (Unless they charge you accordingly). At least barrel-related accuracy issues can be solved with a proper, deep bore cleaning to remove old lead residues, re-crowning or eventually relining the original barrel (A few shops are experts in doing this job).

    Least and cheapest thing you can do is getting a parts diagram and a take-down procedure (Might find a good tutorial in YouTube), strip it down to basics, clean and lube every piece, replace those missing/broken/worn (Ebay, Numrich and other sources might work), get a new reproduction stock (While keeping the original) for proper working condition, and stop any corrosion issue while keeping whatever original finish still remains.
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