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Today we were hunting deer again

TurdusMerulaTurdusMerula MemberPosts: 293 Member
There were about 20 men today with four dachshunds looking for some white tail deer. I was waiting in my position and I didn't have to wait too long until one doe came running through the field towards me. At around 80 yards it took a turn and showed it's broadside. Took it to my crosshair and pulled the trigger. Bullet hit slightly lower than I wished but did it's work with lungs and liver. Deer bolted to near forest and after tracking the blood splashes for about 150 yards I found it lying dead. Pretty satisfied as it was still a pretty nice shot to running deer off hand from the distance.
It was a good day again for me. We got six deers today and it was nice to be one of the lucky ones.
Next weekend we start moose hunting. Can't wait.



To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour
-William Blake-

Replies

  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    Looks like a nice fat doe.

    I am so jealous that you are going to hunt moose.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 13,086 Senior Member
    That'll do! I will have to post you some pictures from our deer camp, you look like you are taking pictures from it.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,922 Senior Member
    Congrats. That's pretty country.
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    What did you say your name was? Simo Hayhe? :uhm:
  • TurdusMerulaTurdusMerula Member Posts: 293 Member
    What did you say your name was? Simo Hayhe? :uhm:
    Haha! Simo Häyhä used iron sights, not scope. Scopes are for amateurs like me :)
    It's very common here to shoot deer/moose while they run. Driven hunt is a traditional way to hunt those species here and you have to practise to shoot with a rifle to a moving target.
    Todays shot was little more difficult as the deer kept bouncing while running in rapeseed field.
    To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour
    -William Blake-
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,862 Senior Member
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,379 Senior Member
    What did you say your name was? Simo Hayhe? :uhm:

    Nice doe
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Haha! Simo Häyhä used iron sights, not scope. Scopes are for amateurs like me :)
    It's very common here to shoot deer/moose while they run. Driven hunt is a traditional way to hunt those species here and you have to practise to shoot with a rifle to a moving target.
    Todays shot was little more difficult as the deer kept bouncing while running in rapeseed field.

    Not so much. When you get older you will learn to appreciate Optics. I don't care who you are, the sharpness goes away with age and optics start to get necessary.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • TurdusMerulaTurdusMerula Member Posts: 293 Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Not so much. When you get older you will learn to appreciate Optics. I don't care who you are, the sharpness goes away with age and optics start to get necessary.

    I'm 46 years old at the moment and I have noticed while reading the paper that somehow my arms are starting to be too short
    :buff2:
    To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour
    -William Blake-
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    I was like that! awesome 20/10 vision in both eyes as a youth. Caused a few eyebrow raising comments from the medics when I would have my annual physical in the Navy. Then, at about TurdusMerula's age it started happening! At about 60ish I developed catarachs. BUT....! Went to the Mayo Clinic and had catarach surgery in both eyes and my vision is back up to a sharp 20/15 in each eye! Have never used a scope on a rifle. Don't need one.....give me Southern Mountain Rifle sights and I'm happy and usually proficient! Usually. Though at 78 its getting a little harder to hold my squirrel rifle steady.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,194 Senior Member
    Congratulations! Nice shot.

    I didn't realize there were whitetail deer in your part of the world. Are they imported from North America?
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • TurdusMerulaTurdusMerula Member Posts: 293 Member
    JerryBobCo wrote: »
    Congratulations! Nice shot.

    I didn't realize there were whitetail deer in your part of the world. Are they imported from North America?

    Actually, JerryBob, they are. Finnish immigrants who moved to US in 30's send them here. A few deers arrived here in 1934 and now we have a healthy number of them here.
    To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour
    -William Blake-
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    Good shooting. :up:
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    It interests me that Whitetails were successfully established in Finland. That's very far north from the home range here in the States. Where was the release point in Finland? And I wonder how far the deer have spread from the release location. From a wildlife biology/management standpoint it's interesting!
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,181 Senior Member
    Good result and good shooting. I like the looks of the country.

    It sounds like Finland has the same sort of introduced animals we have here. Whitetail deer and Moose were introduced, the Whitetail survived, the Moose disappeared into Fiordland never to be seen again, although there are some people who think one or two may have survived.............but they resemble the 'Bigfoot' hunters in the USA for the most part.
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    Didn't know that you had Odocoileus virginianus also, Alec! That's interesting too! I can see the deer adjusting and surviving in New Zealand, But Finland? Wow! I'm a little bit familiar with that part of the world on the same north latitude but east of our friend in Finland, and I think it would be a rough go for Whitetails there, but maybe I'm wrong! (I used to be familiar with the area somewhat, but that was years ago! Forget that I'm getting old as hell!)
  • TurdusMerulaTurdusMerula Member Posts: 293 Member
    It interests me that Whitetails were successfully established in Finland. That's very far north from the home range here in the States. Where was the release point in Finland? And I wonder how far the deer have spread from the release location. From a wildlife biology/management standpoint it's interesting!
    They were released in a place called Vesilahti. It's in a southern part of Finland. Nowadays Whitetail is spread mostly to 1/3 southern parts of our country. I just checked the newest info about the quantity and it seems that we have about 42-50 thousand of them. And about 25 thousand licenses have been approved for the hunting.
    As they live in southern parts of the Finland where most of the people here live too numbers have to be regulated because of the accidents in traffic increase as the numbers of the whitetails grows. Around 3000 car accidents in a year with deers.
    We have had a few mild winters here recently and it has helped the population to grow very powerfully lately.
    To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower
    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour
    -William Blake-
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,862 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Dachshunds. As in weiner dogs?
    Seems funny to me to see a short legged dog running deer.
    Point is they run slower than long legged dogs so the deer run ahead then start walking making for easier shooting.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    This topic of Whitetails in Finland and New Zealand and elsewhere is extremely interesting to anyone like myself who has a background in forest/wildlife management. I don't have the time right now--need to be running the gristmill to fill big orders for grits/cornmeal--but tonight or tomorrow night when I've put in my 10 hours of work and have a little shot of "Wild Turkey" to loosen my tongue and thoughts, I'll say a few words about Whitetails here in the Deep South. I'm very fortunate in having had the opportunity to work on re-establishment of the species back in the early 1960's during my undergraduate days at the UGA.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Senior Member Posts: 2,725 Senior Member
    A few comments on Whitetails in the Deep Southern States:

    Deer were virtually extirpated from the Deep South following the War of the 1860's with a follow-up of the Great Depression, which actually was an extended period of time probably starting in 1865 and not ending until about 1940 when Roosevelt and Hitler got together and corrected the Southern Economy. People were going to eat, and Native Southerners are pretty darn good in the woods with a rifle or shotgun..... or with hand tools and a garden space,'least they used to be!

    The Southern economy greatly improved during WWII and beyond, and in the mid-1950's a move was initiated by the game departments of the Southern States to protect the deer from killing/poaching and manage the population....though knowledge of biological management methods was limited. (German management techniques from as far back as the 1600's were referenced and studied!)

    There were a few wildlife biologists with various state game commissions and universities who started putting things together with research programs and herd management experimentations. One of the most notable and outstanding of these biologists was from the Upper Lake States who came South to work with the state of Georgia, set up experimental work at the Univ. of Georgia, and helped set up a program of joint Deer/Bob White quail management at Tall Timbers Research Station which almost joins my property here where I live. That was Jack Crockfort, about 12 years my senior, and with whom I initially worked as a student employee at the U of Ga. Jack and I became friends and frequently quail hunted together on one of the plantations where I had forest/wildlife management responsibilities for years. Few people have any idea how much is owed to Jack for returning the Whitetail population to a healthy state of existence!

    In my lifetime Whitetails have gone from a state of extirpation to overabundance and now back down to well below the carrying capacity of the land to support the population. It is not overhunting that has done this. Neither is it the sudden intrusion of coyotes (though you cannot...CANNOT... make people understand this) nor is it diseases and bott flies. The biggest predator to the Whitetail population is AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE COMPANIES!

    Last figures that I saw was something like 41,000 deer/automobile collisions in the state of Georgia in 2015! Twelve Southern States with high deer numbers! Twelve times 41,000 equals almost half a million deer hit by vehicles in 2015!! I could ramble on and on about all this, but I've said enough.....!
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,438 Senior Member
    I'm only 53 and I can remember when seeing a deer track on my grandfather's farm was a noteworthy event. For many years the eastern part of this county did other have a "doe day" during deer season. Only the western side. Seeing deer at night was a rare occurrence. Now I have to be careful turning into my driveway at.night because of deer.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Turdus -

    Congrats on another excellent hunt. I have never been witness to a dog-driven hunt like this, but I have to imagine it's a great time. Best of luck on the moose hunt when the time comes!
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
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