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Received mini mill.

RocketmanRocketman BannedPosts: 1,118 Senior Member
IMG_20161128_215130_zpsoc6nu9qr.jpg

Crappy pic but the best I could manage. Came home today from some errands and found FedEx must not have wanted to lug this heavy ass thing to my door lol. They left it near my garage and had it covered in a plastic bag which I'm grateful for because its been raining like a monsoon here today. Drug it in the garage and got it all unpacked which included cutting steel packaging straps and unbolting it from the crate. First impressions??? Nice! Also, lots and lots of cosmoline. Sinceni didn't want it in the garage I got the pleasure of lugging it (painstakingly) down to my basement to reside by my mini lathe. I could have kept it in my garage with my larger lathe but nah, I wanna sit on my ass on my stool whilst I destroy a few things in learning to use it in the comfort of my basement! And yes, for you that noticed, I do have it sitting on my pellet stove. I have to buy a stand to bolt it down to, but for now it rests here. I haven't used it yet beyond turning it on. Its not the quietest thing but it isn't terribly loud. The bedways are smooth and the handles turn stiff but nice. Haven't trammed it yet but I'll definitely do so before I give it a whirl. Once I actually put it to use, I'll give a full range report. But I have a feeling it will do just fine for smithing projects.

Replies

  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I can almost see the metal shavings, smell the oil, and hear the chatter:tooth:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Your mini mill, my mini mill, same-same. I can help you with questions that might come up. :up:
    That little motor has a LOT more power that it looks like it would generate.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Your mini mill, my mini mill, same-same. I can help you with questions that might come up. :up:
    That little motor has a LOT more power that it looks like it would generate.

    Awesome and thank you. I'm sure I'll have plenty to ask as I get along with it.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,692 Senior Member
    That looks exactly like the one I got from Hazard Fraught. Mine stopped working a while ago. Seems there is an electrical issue where everything turns on, but the spindle spindle won't spin
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Be sure to keep the gibs adjusted snug. Some of the import machine tools have a nasty habit of wearing-in pretty quickly and developing free travel from loose gibs. Once the crappy machining on the tapers gets smoothed out, the constant adjusting gets less frequent.
    Jerry
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    I believe I mentioned sometime before that I inherited more end mills and cutters than I could give away in a lifetime. Multiple flutes, double sided, things im not even sure what the hell they do, etc. How do I know which mills I can plunge cut with?
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Rocketman wrote: »
    I believe I mentioned sometime before that I inherited more end mills and cutters than I could give away in a lifetime. Multiple flutes, double sided, things im not even sure what the hell they do, etc. How do I know which mills I can plunge cut with?

    Generally speaking, two flute end mills are used for plunge cutting, but there are also four flute end mills that also are center cutting and can be used for plunge milling. Looking at the 'bidness end' of the mill will tell you which are suitable, or not, for plunge milling. If the teeth on the end of the cutter go fully to the centerline of the mill they will work. If the cutter end teeth stop short of the center (usually a circular area devoid of cutter teeth) then they are only used for planing cuts at end and side of mill.

    Here's a picture I found that shows that center cutting vs. non center cutting. (Click on pic to enlarge)


      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 22,447 Senior Member
    Is more confused that a newborn at a topless bar :uhm:

    Milling/machining are NOT in my "wheel house/ skill set" :nono:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    Thank you Mike. I have multiple sets of both apparently.
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    I even have what appear to be dovetail cutters :uhm:
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    knitepoet wrote: »
    Is more confused that a blind lesbian at a fish market! :uhm:

    FIFY! LOL!
    Jerry
  • RocketmanRocketman Banned Posts: 1,118 Senior Member
    Lmao. Haha hahahaha :rotflmao:
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 5,009 Senior Member
    FWIW, a friend bought a mini mill similar to yours back in the 90s, at first I had my doubts, but as I found out if you don't overload it , its a damn fine machine and very accurate.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Rocketman wrote: »
    I even have what appear to be dovetail cutters :uhm:

    If you have any 3/8" dovetail cutters then you're poopin' in high cotton. Dovetail cutters are pretty handy for some projects. If you have some slot cutters (look like gnarly saw blades, shaft mounted or keyed shaft) then you have more handy cutters. Dovetail cutters and slot cutters are STUPID EXPENSIVE, so if you have them, take REALLY good care of them.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    A 3/8" 60 degree dovetail cutter is the basic tool needed for installing iron sights. Make a straight-across cut with an end mill a little smaller than the top of the cut needs to be, and finish the cut with the dovetail cutter. It's much easier on the cutter than trying to hog out the whole cut in one pass. Leave the cut a few thousandths narrow, and file-fit the sight for a VERY snug fit. Industry standard is to insert the sight into the dovetail from the shooter's right, and hand-file a VERY slight taper into the slot so the sight tightens up as it approaches center. Fitting sights this way has always been hand work, although a talented programmer with a CNC mill might be able to write instructions to cut the taper automatically.
    Jerry
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