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Remington model 30 rifle???

earlyearly Senior MemberPosts: 4,950 Senior Member
I see one featured in a magazine article here. I can't remember ever seeing one before. It had a solid rear bridge, dog leg bolt handle, and a stripper clip loading slot. It looks like it might have a full length claw extractor, but I can't tell??? The safety is wierd looking, bulky.

Anyone know anything about these rifles?????:uhm:
My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.

Replies

  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    Aren't they 1917 actions that were leftover?
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,923 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Yep. They used to grind the ears off and make a sporter out of them. I think that's how they got started in the sporting bolt action business. HELL of a rifle, someday I will find the right one and will re-barrel to .458 Lott and make a nice custom our of it...

    Griffin. & Howe made some awesome sporting rifles out of them....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,826 Senior Member
    Yup! Leftover 1917's from WWI. Remington's first bolt action sporting rifle.
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Ah, that must be why I've never seen one. They're hang onto rifles :up:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,826 Senior Member
    The 1917 was also the first action used by Weatherby. If you look at a MkV they still use the same style safety. At the time it was the only easily available, strong action that could handle the long magnums.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,742 Senior Member
    They're Mauser actions. The rear end is bulky and not just because of the safety. The British designed them for a round that never got developed due to WW 1; I think it was a .280 caliber. The ears they ground off were there to protect the aperture rear sight, which was adjustable for elevation but not windage.

    The Brits made them as P 14s because they couldn't develop the .280 or whatever it was and ran short of the SMLEs. I think all of the P 14s were made here in the US, Remington, Ilion, and Winchester, which was the most prized.

    The Remington Model 30s always looked to me like a home-sporterized P 17 and I would think it's heavy...sure looks heavy.

    Edit: the experimental round for the British was a .276 high velocity round.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,923 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Actually it was more than the actions. After WWI Remington was left with 2 factories and a buttload of surplus inventory of P14 and Model of 1917 rifle parts. The real early 30s actually used military barrels.

    Don't forget that the 1917 (along with the 1903 Springfield) was still being issued and used by the USMC during the opening days of WWII....Marines on Guadalcanal were still using bolt guns....so they were still in the inventory long after WWI...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    The drill rifle Dad carried in Air Force Cadet training was an "Eddystone" (one of the Model 17 manufacturers). He used to tell about having to scrub a couple of pounds of Cosmoline off the new, never-fired rifle and getting it into inspection-ready condition. The inspecting officer knew just where to look, and pulled a big chunk of Cosmoline out of the bolt locking lug area with his little finger!
    Jerry
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,805 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    HELL of a rifle, someday I will find the right one and will re-barrel to .458 Lott and make a nice custom our of it...

    Why so small?? Those 17/30 actions have more real estate than Trump. If it's a 45 you want, go Rigby! Great action to start with for a 505 Gibbs as well. I mean, everyone hates wasted action room :devil:
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,958 Senior Member
    The gun shop where I apprenticed in 60 & 61 built a lot of custom sporters on the P-14 -17 action's and -03s . As stated above the M-30 was just a modified P-14 or -17, 2 stage military trigger, dog leg bolt, and cock on closing, the M-30s were the same except it had a single stage trigger and cocked on opening. Remington than made the M-720, which was a greatly refined P-17, strightened bolt, quick release floor plate, etc. I have only seen one M-720 that was in my bosses collection.

    All the the P14s &-17s they built had Paul Jaeger triggers and were modified to cock on opening, new floor plates, drilled and tapped receivers. They used the P-14s for the 300 & 375 H&H cartridges and used the original dropped floor plate to allow 4 rounds in the magazine and modified the -17 or Win M-70 extractor and opened the action for the longer cartridges.

    My boss gave me a copy of Roy Dunlap's "Gunsmithing" which explained in detail how to modify the trigger to cock on opening in case i wanted to build some after i left, which i did, most were milled with a square rear bridge. I still have that book.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,826 Senior Member
    I've got that book, too! Old school gun smithing!!
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    It sounds like these rifles are real gems if they can be found.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    early wrote: »
    It sounds like these rifles are real gems if they can be found.

    I'll say this, they're real solid. I love 'em. My old friend who lives in Lake Jackson TX has his dad's old sportered 1917. The gun smith did a fantastic job on sporterising it too, it ain't no bubba job for sure. It's a hell of a rifle. It's fixed to cock on opening with a timney trigger. He said the gun smith put a Speed Lock kit in it to make it cock on opening instead of closing. I used to read about Speed Locks in old gun rags. They were big back in the 50s-60s. This gun was sportered in the late 50s.

    About 10 years back his dad traded the thing for a pistol and a couple hundred dollars at a Victoria LGS. Curtis dropped in to visit his dad one day and ask his dad where the old Enfield was and he told him (His dad lives here). He had just traded it the day before. So Curtis got in the car and drove like a man possessed to that gun shop in Victoria. He said there it was still on the rack when he walked in the door. He bought it back. I didn't ask him how much he paid for it, but I recon if they had put $1000 on the price tag and wouldn't budge off it, he would have given it to get that gun back in family possession.

    See, when we were in high school the Scouts were allowed to hunt on the Welder Ranch which hadn't been hunted in 30 years at the time and there were quite a few nice old trophy bucks on the place. He and I were both Boy Scouts. I killed a little 12 inch wide 8 point. He killed a 21 inch wide Monster 9 point (One point had been broken off probably fighting), a deer I would be honored to have on my wall, with that rifle. To say that there was a little sentimentality involved there would be a vast understatement. That's the only deer Curtis has ever killed. If they only let me kill one deer in my life I would take that one in a NEW YORK minute. And that Enfield was what he did it with.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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