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Yes, I COULD build up an expensive 10/22. . .

BigslugBigslug Senior MemberPosts: 8,249 Senior Member
. . .but then I wouldn't have one of THESE :tooth::


Found this child of 1951 in a shop at the edge of my daily operating radius while coming back from a class a bit farther afield. Model 63's first got onto my radar screen when I started working in the LGS back in '92, when Miroku was doing reproductions. They weren't exactly my thing at the time and were a bit beyond my means then anyway, but tastes change and the itch grew.



About the time I decided I might actually want one, the only thing that seemed to cross my path were the older Model 1903 .22 WRF versions for which ammo is expensive and hard to come by. The planets finally aligned and this one landed in front of me. Pretty much new from all appearances, with more handling wear than anything from actual shooting. The action was actually a bit sticky from what might well have been factory goo, and I had to do a bit of strategic oiling to ensure nothing was wrong before slapping down the plastic.

So, another one one of those old Pre-'64's that was ultimately too nice for Winchester's own good comes home. Range report next week. (HAPPY DANCE!)
WWJMBD?

"Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee

Replies

  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    I think you just went right off the suck meter.
    Winchester had auto loading ergonomics cornered with those and the WSL's.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    I like it. Great find. Congrats! :guns: :guns:

    When will you be able to fire it?
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 32,995 Senior Member
    OK next week. Looking forward to that RR.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,689 Senior Member
    VERY nice .22LR rifle! 10/22s can have a ton of configurations and even more accessories to customize & enhance them, but can't compare to that classic.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    . . .but then I wouldn't have one of THESE :tooth::


    Found this child of 1951 in a shop at the edge of my daily operating radius while coming back from a class a bit farther afield. Model 63's first got onto my radar screen when I started working in the LGS back in '92, when Miroku was doing reproductions. They weren't exactly my thing at the time and were a bit beyond my means then anyway, but tastes change and the itch grew.



    About the time I decided I might actually want one, the only thing that seemed to cross my path were the older Model 1903 .22 WRF versions for which ammo is expensive and hard to come by. The planets finally aligned and this one landed in front of me. Pretty much new from all appearances, with more handling wear than anything from actual shooting. The action was actually a bit sticky from what might well have been factory goo, and I had to do a bit of strategic oiling to ensure nothing was wrong before slapping down the plastic.

    So, another one one of those old Pre-'64's that was ultimately too nice for Winchester's own good comes home. Range report next week. (HAPPY DANCE!)

    You really need both. Then you will have "Classic" and "Cool!"
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,890 Senior Member
    Very nice. I would bring one home as well if I found one at a good price.
    That's unfortunately a rather tall order in these parts.
    Congrats on scratching that itch.

    Sako
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,395 Senior Member
    Those are beautiful and well made .22 LR rifles. You definitely pegged the :yousuck: meter! My uncle had one that I got to shoot some as a kid. Definitely one of those grail guns if you are into .22 LR masterpieces! I have NEVER seen one for sale on the used racks anywhere!
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,953 Senior Member
    I'm a sucker for old .22's.
    So hats off on that one.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,622 Senior Member
    Looks very nice for its age, hope it is a shooter.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,249 Senior Member
    sakodude wrote: »
    Very nice. I would bring one home as well if I found one at a good price.
    That's unfortunately a rather tall order in these parts.
    Congrats on scratching that itch.

    Sako

    Thanks. Wasn't so much a matter of "good price" as "good luck finding another one this clean". Price was fair, and sometimes ya just gotta suck it up. It worked out alright though; since I vectored my dad into a couple other tidbits they had there, they were willing to eat the DROS/NICS charge out of their consignment fee for me.

    The rifle is an absolute TANK in terms of construction. While I was enduring the 10 day wait, I spent a few idle moments downloading takedown instructions and exploded parts diagrams. Even the outer magazine tube looks to be milled steel rather than the extrude/stamp/weld approach you typically see. Every piece of it appears to be a monument to the process of "Take a huge chunk of carbon steel and polish off everything that doesn't look like a firearm". I picked up a Model 74 a couple years ago that was being manufactured concurrently - fun gun, but you can see the compromises made for the sake of price point. NONE of that going on here. I expect they had the "grown ups" who made the 52 match rifles working on these.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 10,903 Senior Member
    Great find Congrats :yousuck:
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,085 Senior Member
    SWEET :yousuck:

    Waiting for the range report :popcorn:
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • Farm Boy DeuceFarm Boy Deuce Senior Member Posts: 6,083 Senior Member
    Very nice. You suck lots.
    I am afraid we forget sometime that the basic and simple things brings us the most pleasure.
    Dad 5-31-13
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,823 Senior Member
    Very nice find!! I love old .22's and if I found a nice 63 I'd have to claim it!!
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,249 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Dear LORD :yousuck:!!!

    Wow! A deity-invoking "You suck!" Truly, I have arrived. :roll2:

    Probably going to be a few days longer than expected on the range report guys. Looks like it's got a broken firing pin. The tip protrudes through the breech face when I push it forward, but it stays there while the back half rebounds with its return spring.

    No biggie. Ebay to the rescue with a free shipping NOS replacement for $25, so all will be right with the world soon.

    Poop. . .
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,823 Senior Member
    I find more parts on Ebay than anywhere else!!
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,249 Senior Member
    OK. . .Got it running! (More Happy Dance!:cool2:)

    I tore into the interior to replace the firing pin, pulling out the bolt and charging handle parts and got a firsthand look at the build quality. WOW! Brought to mind these words of Rush (for those into rock & roll philosophy):

    I strip away the old debris
    That hides a shining car
    A brilliant red Barchetta
    from better, vanished time.


    A couple shots of the bolt:

    Throughout the gun, there is nothing aluminum. Nothing plastic. Nothing stamped. Nothing welded. Nothing set in place with Loc Tite. No trigger adjustment screws secured with nail polish. The forend cap is probably two ounces of milled, blued steel...possibly to counterweight the outer magazine tube in the stock, which is about 3/32" thick milled steel. The wood-to-metal fit is not quite what you'll see on Winchester's 1870's and '80's leverguns, but the thought that the industry giant of the era would pour so much obvious effort into an autoloading, open-sight, no-optics-possible rimfire plinker makes me smile. . .real wide. The bean-counters would probably hang, draw, and quarter anyone who'd even consider firing up a mill on something like it today.:worthy:

    Makes me smile even wider to see that it looks like I'm going to be finishing the break-in process on a 65 year old rifle. It's REAL clean in there!



    Here's the dead firing pin alongside the NOS replacement. Probably the only thing like a weak point in the entire design; a long, tapering firing pin that you don't want to dry fire, in a ten-shot semi-auto repeater with no last-shot hold-open. Remembering to count is the only damper to the fun. OTOH, it's probably a good design for keeping crud from affecting firing pin movement (not that this thing is hard to get into to clean).

    A proper ACCURACY report is going to have to wait. Conditions were indoor range + crappy light + open sights + old prescription, scratched glasses which doesn't allow me to tell you much other than "it'll kill soda cans at 25 yards all day long" Paging Captain Obvious. . . The good news is it's centered and a little high at 25, so probably already set for 50.

    But for A range report. . .I started with Federal 711B Gold Medal to see if it would run on slower stuff. Not so much. About a 20% stove pipe rate on them. Not really surprising as it says right on the barrel "SUPER SPEED or SUPER X".

    Dumped in the CCI Mini Mags and it runs like a top. Definitely a SMOOTH running gun on which they spent some time balancing the innards. I think I may have to do a "Bring all your friend's .22 semi rifles to the range at once" day. To test exactly WHAT I don't know, but I just feel like comparing. . .

    I'll get it shot for group for you guys, but that's not what this thing will be for. Empty shotgun shells, golf balls, water bottles. . .maybe even clay pigeons if the backstop permits. It shall go in my collection of "Therapy Rifles".:tooth:
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Somewhere on my bookshelves I have a photograph of part of the old Winchester shop with machines run by leather belts. They had like a little machining city at one time. Cheyenne Wyo used to have a similar type deal to keep them old steamers going. Could make any part from scratch. Once upon a time.
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • Uncle FesterUncle Fester Senior Member Posts: 1,370 Senior Member
    Bigslug wrote: »
    . . .but then I wouldn't have one of THESE :tooth::


    Found this child of 1951 in a shop at the edge of my daily operating radius while coming back from a class a bit farther afield. Model 63's first got onto my radar screen when I started working in the LGS back in '92, when Miroku was doing reproductions. They weren't exactly my thing at the time and were a bit beyond my means then anyway, but tastes change and the itch grew.



    About the time I decided I might actually want one, the only thing that seemed to cross my path were the older Model 1903 .22 WRF versions for which ammo is expensive and hard to come by. The planets finally aligned and this one landed in front of me. Pretty much new from all appearances, with more handling wear than anything from actual shooting. The action was actually a bit sticky from what might well have been factory goo, and I had to do a bit of strategic oiling to ensure nothing was wrong before slapping down the plastic.

    So, another one one of those old Pre-'64's that was ultimately too nice for Winchester's own good comes home. Range report next week. (HAPPY DANCE!)

    You suck!
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    You suck!

    A guy I knew from work gave me two of those to refinish the stocks. A friend of mine who was set up to to hot blue guns did a re-blue of the metal. I had to glue both butt stocks because they were cracked in a couple places on both of them. Both had cracks that went through or across the mag tubes. Some of the epoxy oozed into the tube area and I didn't realize it. When I gave him the stocks to reassemble the metal the dummy drove the tubes through the holes into the stocks. It cracked hell out of both butt stocks. I was pissed. I had to take them back apart and re-glue and partially refinish both butt stocks. This time I ran a long drill through both buttstocks Mag tube holes. They looked great when I finished, but they looked great before he crudely drove the magazine tubes through the butt stocks too. Lots of extra work that could have been avoided. All he had to do was tell me and I would have run a drill through the tube holes to clean them up. God was I pissed.

    But they were those same Model 63s, beautiful rifles. Anyway, Otis (was his name) was very pleased with the work we both did. Chester, the guy that did the bluing could blue his ass off. He did excellent metal work, you just had to keep hm away from anything he could break with a hammer.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,249 Senior Member
    All right then! You know how Stevens made a rifle that was called the Crack Shot?

    I think Winchester made the Crack Pipe. . .'cause I pretty much couldn't put it down today. Probably somewhere around 300 rounds downrange - mostly fired at empty shotgun shells tossed out in front of the firing line. It's REAL quick back on target, and REAL nice on trigger reset, and if I figure out a decent way to quantify it, I suspect pretty darned accurate for what it is.

    And that's the toughie. . . with a 2" orange paster at 50 yards, I can turn in 3 shot fragments of five shot groups in the 1/2" to 3/4" inch range, but the joys of open U-rear / bead front sights and astigmatism keep me from getting enough contrast on paper to seal the deal. But with a spent shotgun shell lying on brown sand in the 30-40 yard range, there's plenty of contrast, and misses are only due to sighting error. A correction on the next one does the deed, and the same hold on the next one does the deed, and so on. Really too bad the gun doesn't run on low-vel match ammo. It could probably do some really impressive things with that kind of round. . .but then again, not what this rifle is for. How it handles is the seller, and the ammo it runs on is perfectly adequate to the empty shotshells, golf balls, water bottles, and dog food cans it will be turned against.

    Got some minor feeding issues to wade through. Sometimes runs through the whole mag; sometimes fails to spit one into the chamber - usually, but not always, the first, manually loaded one. Something for another day. The science of testing ammo types comes later. Today was about screwing around. . . and I got a great ride to do it with!

    And I think it's name may officially be "Crackpipe".:tooth:
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Tom-my gunTom-my gun New Member Posts: 6 New Member
    That's a very very nice rifle you have there. It reminds me of the old western movies, brilliant
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,689 Senior Member
    Usually HV CCRN ammo is the best to make this old actions run properly. Also a very good chamber cleaning, proper lubing of moving internal parts and a new set of springs help a lot solving cycling/loading issues.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,249 Senior Member
    Antonio wrote: »
    Usually HV CCRN ammo is the best to make this old actions run properly. Also a very good chamber cleaning, proper lubing of moving internal parts and a new set of springs help a lot solving cycling/loading issues.

    Whatever's going on, it's in the cartridge release part of the cycle of operations, or very slightly afterwards. Going to have to analyze fully what's going on, but when it does what it's SUPPOSED to, the magazine spits a cartridge into the chamber as the bolt is coming back, usually getting about 2/3rds of the brass chambered. All the bolt really does is tap the round the rest of the way in and the extractor hook snaps over the rim. I haven't gotten around to cleaning the cartridge stop hardware yet - that's up before the next range session.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
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