Home Main Category Second Amendment/Politics

Police save more lives than they take. Exponentially.

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  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,861 Senior Member
    Needed for the rescue squad
    they have come for Clean a couple of times.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Hahahahaha!! Good lord.

    If I had to make a delivery to your place and it wasn't numbered, and you weren't at home, then you'd not be getting your box of whatever. No positive ID, no package. And since there is no way to identify the house, no note about no delivery. Package would end back up at the shipper's place if there was no phone contact info. Being a horses derriere has consequences, especially if you need the services of an ambulance and they can't find you! :tooth:
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,287 Senior Member
    Hahahahaha!! Good lord.

    What pray tell is your issue with that? I suppose it's unconstitutional...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,555 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Makes sense. Why wouldn't anyone want their house easily identified? Mail, UPS, FED-EX deliveries, pizza and other deliveries are easier if the person delivering has some idea they are at the right place. My outside light next to the door lights up the numbers on my house. Living out in the country, the UPS and FED-EX drivers all appreciate that when they deliver in the daytime. They know they are at the right place.
    It does make life easier. Also, mailboxes should have a reflective number on them, preferably visible in both directions.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,555 Senior Member
    Oh, and the rules regarding the numbering are usually city or county ordinances, so the punishment is limited to a fine, not to a chance of incarceration.
    Overkill is underrated.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,287 Senior Member
    It does make life easier. Also, mailboxes should have a reflective number on them, preferably visible in both directions.

    It's always been required by the USPS anywhere I have lived...at least if you want to get your mail delivered...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Oh, and the rules regarding the numbering are usually city or county ordinances, so the punishment is limited to a fine, not to a chance of incarceration.

    Yeah. Not really a big deal as to the fine. No fine where I live, but it makes it easier for other folk. My mailbox has the number on both sides in reflective numbers. The regular mail lady knows me by name, but the substitutes don't, so I get my mail and not the mail of someone else by mistake, and vice versa.
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    The perceived humor puzzles me. I must have missed the joke?

    Look on the bright side. Since he doesn't appear to believe that having numbers on mailboxes and houses/buildings are important, he's willingly setting himself for a wrong address soiree with the PD on a wrong address arrest warrant.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,555 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    Yeah. Not really a big deal as to the fine. No fine where I live, but it makes it easier for other folk. My mailbox has the number on both sides in reflective numbers. The regular mail lady knows me by name, but the substitutes don't, so I get my mail and not the mail of someone else by mistake, and vice versa.
    I get the wrong mail on occasion. But, it's usually an "easy" mistake. N. vs. S., off by a digit, etc.

    And the mistakes on identifying who you are and where you live aren't limited to government. I'm still getting debt collection calls for the guy who had my phone number some 7 years ago. And we're getting mail for folks who were here 2 homeowners before us....
    Overkill is underrated.
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,728 Senior Member
    I live out in the boonies with nearest neighbor 2 miles away and my mail box 1/2 mile away.
    I put my house number up in reflective numbers on a building by the road.
  • JasonMPDJasonMPD Senior Member Posts: 6,557 Senior Member
    tennmike wrote: »
    I think you may misunderstand what I was saying. So I'll come at it from a different direction and maybe make it clearer.

    Humans, by their nature, are prone to make mistakes. Inattention to detail, arrogance, the "I've done this a thousand times before" attitude, and more all set up the conditions for failure. With step by step procedures with sign-offs at each step, one is required to STOP AND THINK. Verification of the step is two part. So, for cops, it would be 1. read the address on the warrant, and 2. verify the address one is at, and if they're smart, then they will do that twice. Paranoia, or a healthy dose of OCD, is a good motivator in making one RTFI. If steps 1 and 2 cannot be verified for whatever reason, then that is a really good reason to back off and get more information before proceeding.

    Encountering unexpected conditions is always a good place to pause and reassess the situation. Blindly forging forward generally has a poor outcome. That goes for people in general, as well as cops and the military.

    100% perfection should be a goal, knowing that there WILL be mistakes. But doing EVERYTHING WITHIN ONE'S POWER to minimize mistakes and improve the odds of NOT making a mistake should always be the goal, too. When 'business as usual' isn't cutting it, it might be time to look at ways to improve the positive.

    And as to another suggestion that would REALLY make a difference, numbers on house and mailbox is a start. Lawmakers are always passing stupid stuff, so how about making that a law that actually serves a purpose, and just not for cops. EMS and firemen could also benefit. Just drive around any town or city and see how many buildings and houses lack numbers prominently displayed. Sounds worthwhile to me, but that's just my opinion.

    We have had to serve warrants in neighborhoods where they intentionally remove, obscure, or mislabel house numbers for all houses on a block. We have to consult the county property appraisers website for the legitimate house numbers. There hasn't been a wrong door rammed yet, but that's inevitable on a long enough time scale.

    City Code requires homes to be numbered in white numerals at least 3 inches tall. No one abides and Code enforcement ain't going into those neighborhoods.
    “There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” – Will Rogers
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    JasonMPD wrote: »
    We have had to serve warrants in neighborhoods where they intentionally remove, obscure, or mislabel house numbers for all houses on a block. We have to consult the county property appraisers website for the legitimate house numbers. There hasn't been a wrong door rammed yet, but that's inevitable on a long enough time scale.

    City Code requires homes to be numbered in white numerals at least 3 inches tall. No one abides and Code enforcement ain't going into those neighborhoods.

    That's what I've been saying. You take the time to verify the right address/house. That's commendable, and your results of no wrong doors rammed speaks to its effectiveness. That's all anyone can ask. Due diligence to get it right the first time, every time. Y'all are trying to do it right, and that's what's really important.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,394 Senior Member
    Diver43 wrote: »
    Like it? absolutely not. However, when humans are part of the equation mistakes happen. That is reality. Google says there is aprox. 765K officers in America, plus another 44K part timers. Lets make the math easy and say 800K. If .5% made one mistake a year how many mistakes would that be?
    That would be 4000 mistakes would it not? Just one is too many, but reality is mistakes happen

    Yep I agree, and when mistakes happen and some innocent person is killed it sucks big time weiners. But guess what? It happens no matter what amount or quality of training or whatever. As long as cops are human and not robots it will happen. But I have a suggestion for those that can't accept it, next time you're in trouble call a hippie!
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
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