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Cast-iron cookware "break-in"

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  • BuffcoBuffco Senior Member Posts: 6,244 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    The new ones have rough cooking surfaces that are tough to make really stick proof. Get OLD cast iron like Griswold. Plenty of it laying soured in antique stores. The inside is finished beautifully, really smooth and seasons much faster and better!!!

    This. I bought a new one 2 years ago. I like it, but that pebbled finish is crap. It's a Lodge manufacture. I could never get it like I wanted it, it stuck as bad as my wife's stainless cookware, but I just watched a video where the guy used this:

    d731584e-ca37-46c8-856f-234da839e6da_1000.jpg

    I'm going to try it on my skillet to get the pebbling out. I don't know if it's a lack of hand machining or the sand process, but they are much rougher in finish than the one's my grandmother had.
  • KMT2KMT2 Member Posts: 373 Member
    zorba wrote: »
    I can only go on what my dear ol' Ma told me - she said the soap/stuff/whatever in SOS pads doesn't strip the seasoning; from what I've seen over the years, it doesn't. It isn't regular soap anyway - it doesn't lather at all. Dunno what it is...

    I have used the sos pads many a time and use they produce a lather and suds. I have stripped off seasoning and other cooked on and backed on stuff(note years and years in a kitchen ) so yeah if you want to work hard on the pan use one. if not use nylon scrubs and know that you will work a bit.

    Also please know that I do re season after every cook job with the iron pans. hot pan and a bit of oil rubbed in , helps heal and seal any lost season layer. Though Zorba please don't use 30 weight motor oil it will make your california:yikes::yikes::yikes: grilled veggie sandwich taste very bad!
    If you think OHSA is a little town in Wisconsin you may be in trouble!
    Peace is firing my guns or 60 feet below the surface of the water.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,244 Senior Member
    KMT2 wrote: »
    Though Zorba please don't use 30 weight motor oil it will make your california:yikes::yikes::yikes: grilled veggie sandwich taste very bad!
    Zorba is a Florida gal' now. The use KY lubricant down there.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    I'm going to try it on my skillet to get the pebbling out.

    Use a 180 grit ROLOC sanding disc with an air die grinder running at about half speed to do most of the smoothing, then use that item or a coarse ScotchBrite disc for finishing. If you try the woven nylon abrasive with a drill motor to begin with, you'll be there three days past forever before you see an improvement.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Roll-Lock-Sanding-Disc-Pad-Holder-Polishing-Mandrel-1-4-Shank-Roloc-82095-/132149849261?epid=691351008&hash=item1ec4beacad:g:~~wAAOSw3gJZKPgY

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/25pc-IIT-3-Roloc-Discs-120-GRIT-R-Type-Sanding-Abrasive-Roll-Lock-Coarse-82080-/131100120611?hash=item1e862d1623:g:NvgAAOSw7GRZKPf4

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-MEDIUM-MAROON-SCOTCH-BRITE-ROLOC-DISCS-USA-QTY-25-/322307352243?hash=item4b0b03e6b3:g:TzgAAOSwal5YERvV

    Jerry
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 25,090 Senior Member
    Buffco wrote: »
    I'm going to try it on my skillet to get the pebbling out. I don't know if it's a lack of hand machining or the sand process, but they are much rougher in finish than the one's my grandmother had.

    Let us know how it works - we inherited an absolutely terrible little grill/skillet thing that has pebbling the size of boulders. I hate the thing.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,642 Senior Member
    I think they're all "pebbly" until they're seasoned smooth. I've got three pots, probably 100 years old or older, that lost their seasoning and are now pebbly. I don't cook enough in them to naturally build up the seasoning. My skillet is slick and black because I use it a lot and don't normally use soap on it; don't need to.

    If you have to use soap on a seasoned iron pot, it ain't seasoned enough. Detergent cuts grease and grease is what you want to build up.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    we inherited an absolutely terrible little grill/skillet thing that has pebbling the size of boulders. I hate the thing.

    Bring it to the next shoot- - - - -it's an easy fix.
    Jerry
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 25,090 Senior Member
    Teach wrote: »
    Bring it to the next shoot- - - - -it's an easy fix.
    Jerry

    Thanx! Its one of those griddle things with the ribs in the bottom - still fixable?
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,642 Senior Member
    cpj wrote: »
    Ok, if you reseason after each cook job, your point of soap not affecting them is invalid.
    And it's also pointless to season after each cook job, if they are well seasoned to begin with, and you dont use.....soap.

    I also heat-dry them after each use and add oil and rub it in. I don't call that "re-seasoning," I call it "maintaining" the season. Works for me, and I don't use soap at all.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    Thanx! Its one of those griddle things with the ribs in the bottom - still fixable?

    Probably- - - - -email me a picture.
    Jerry
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 25,090 Senior Member
    Here it is...

    attachment.php?attachmentid=10622&d=1506115342
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Polishing the tops of the ribs is easy- - - -getting in between 'em just takes something like a cartridge roll or a tapered cratex roll. Compared to polishing a cylinder head combustion chamber, that's an easy one.
    Jerry
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,797 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    Here it is...

    attachment.php?attachmentid=10622&d=1506115342

    I don't see anything wrong with that. Food only touchs the top of the rib. We have a couple of them and I have a large one by Lodge that I use almost weekly and I love cooking on it.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 25,090 Senior Member
    Tops of the ribs are relatively smooth - but the in-betweens are quite rough and a pain to clean. Enough food gets in-between to cause problems.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,161 Senior Member
    Fisheadgib wrote: »
    I don't see anything wrong with that. Food only touchs the top of the rib. We have a couple of them and I have a large one by Lodge that I use almost weekly and I love cooking on it.

    I have one of those... you're thinking too hard partner...a couple of licks with a wire brush gets the crusties right off..
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • TeachTeach Senior Member Posts: 18,428 Senior Member
    Yep, hot water and a grill brush would make short work of cleaning, but it's also easy to polish.
    Jerry
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 25,090 Senior Member
    We have another one that has NONE of these problems. Unfortunately, its big and heavy and wifey doesn't like to use it unless she has to.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,766 Senior Member
    zorba wrote: »
    We have another one that has NONE of these problems. Unfortunately, its big and heavy and wifey doesn't like to use it unless she has to.

    The problem isn't the griddle.

    Just saying.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,122 Senior Member
    Oddly enough, my wife just impulse bought a two skillet cast iron pan set from Costco over the weekend. I just cooked a few slices of bacon in the small one to start the seasoning.

    They do seem to have a rougher cooking surface than my years old no name skillet that I have been working on seasoning for just about 9 years. I'll try my normal seasoning for a while, and then see if I want to sand it smooth.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
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