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11-87 Troubleshooting

shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior MemberPosts: 5,882 Senior Member
I have a Remington 11-87 Police Magnum (2.75" or 3" chamber) that unfortunately isn't functioning reliably with standard power 2.65" ammo. So far I've tried #8 target loads, 00 buck, and 1 oz slugs all with similar malfunctions.

What will happen is the bolt won't send the round all the way into the chamber. It will start to feed and then stop. A tap on the charging handle puts it into battery.

Thoughts?
- I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
"Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski

Replies

  • earlyearly Senior Member Posts: 4,950 Senior Member
    Recoil spring?
    Bur in the chamber?
    O ring worn or intalled backward?
    :uhm:
    My thoughts are generally clear. My typing, not so much.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    I'm not really familiar with the 11-87 but I'd check for the obvious. Disassemble and check chamber for crud buildup. Plastic bits stuck in the chamber will stop a shotshell from chambering.
    Check the assembly and orientation of the gas system parts. Reversing a friction ring or other part can cause problems in any gas operated shotgun.
    Last, check for drag while cycling the bolt. Ride home into battery and check for any obvious drag at some point. Especially around the last half inch of travel before the bolt goes into battery. You may have a burr that has developed slowing it down at the recoil spring's weakest point of travel.
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  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,617 Senior Member
    Lube?
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • BufordBuford Senior Member Posts: 6,721 Senior Member
    Dirty? my Winchester does that after 300 to 400 rounds. Clean it up and I'm good to go again. Great for hunting skeet not so much.
    Just look at the flowers Lizzie, just look at the flowers.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,753 Senior Member
    A couple possibilities come to mind (had the 11-87 class many moons ago, but not nearly so well versed as with the 870, but as the 11-87 is essentially a gas-driven 870...):

    With the 870, you can get a condition known as "stem top chamber" or, less commonly, "stem bottom chamber". This is where the shell carrier (elevator) is bent either too high or too low, respectively, and the round isn't going straight into the chamber, but rather it impacts first at the top of the receiver or the bottom of the barrel. This usually results in rough feeding with an 870, but usually won't choke the gun entirely. Best way to check is to slowly let the gun feed a shell and watch how the crimped end guides in. Sounds like you might have a stem top issue and the gun is spending most of its spring energy on resistance of the shell rubbing on the barrel extension. I can walk you through that fix if that's what it is.

    Could be your rubber o-ring is cracked and dying, bleeding off your cycling gas, and you're not getting a full stroke of the action to feed the next round. If the gun will feed the first round with you releasing the charging handle from all the way back, but not from firing the gun, this would seem likely - or else you've got some other manner of resistance causing the same effect..

    Could have resistance on the extractor. It's a pretty simple spring & plunger arrangement almost like a Glock. You should be able to pull it outward against spring tension and have it snap right back. If it's at all sluggish, crunchy, or crusty feeling, pull and clean the extractor, plunger, spring, and channel and get some CLP in there. This might possibly be a minor contributor to a stem top chamber issue if there's a lot of extractor resistance preventing a shell from following its normal angles.

    Remove the barrel and starting with a clean bore and chamber, check the edges of the chamber by plunking a round into it. The round should fall out of the chamber under its own weight. What can happen on 870's is the bolt impacts the chamber face and peens over the steel - mostly in two locations about 1/8" to 1/4" long - to where it pinches against the rim of a shell. Some careful work with the edge of a barette file will take those burrs down.

    Does the action close easily WITHOUT a shell? If so, it probably isn't anything to do with burrs on the bolt's locking block or its locking cut in the barrel extension.

    And of course, check for general cleanliness.

    That should get you started. Standing by for updates.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,238 Senior Member
    I have a Remington 11-87 Police Magnum (2.75" or 3" chamber) that unfortunately isn't functioning reliably with standard power 2.65" ammo. So far I've tried #8 target loads, 00 buck, and 1 oz slugs all with similar malfunctions.

    What will happen is the bolt won't send the round all the way into the chamber. It will start to feed and then stop. A tap on the charging handle puts it into battery.

    Thoughts?

    Its summer where you are with hot temps?

    Pull it down, clean all the bits with brake cleaner. Use a compressed air gun to blow out any crud. Check that the extractor is moving freely. Get a piece of wooden dowel, wrap some fine steel wool around it and use it to polish the chamber. Check the spring in the stock to make sure it hasnt broken. Respray all the parts with something like Inox.

    Sometimes in really hot weather I found my 1187's would seize up cos all the lube would evaporate and leave a sticky residue. It doesnt take much crud to slow the action down.

    In really hot weather I used to run them 'wet'............ie carried a small aerosol can in my pocket and gave them a quick squirt through the breech onto the trigger assembly..
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,617 Senior Member
    orchidman wrote: »

    In really hot weather I used to run them 'wet'............ie carried a small aerosol can in my pocket and gave them a quick squirt through the breech onto the trigger assembly..

    Yep...also saw the same thing happen in brutally cold weather when the lube turns to sludge...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,882 Senior Member
    Thanks for the input folks. I'm going to tear it down this week (hopefully) and do some basic troubleshooting. I'm hoping it's as simple as an improperly installed O ring or an action spring that needs replacing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,600 Senior Member
    The very first thing I would do is replace the o ring. And thoroughly clean it. I have several 1100/11-87s, most all malfunctions I've experienced are o ring related.
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,941 Senior Member
    #21 Viton O'ring. This is the industrial version of the Remington part and MUCH cheaper.
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,954 Senior Member
    Only thing I can add is if it is well used, make sure the gas ports are not partially filled with carbon build up.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,954 Senior Member
    I thought some more on this issue and have had it happen and it is real simple fix.

    It is part #55 the interceptor latch
    all you have to do is take the trigger housing group out, turn the receiver upside down,
    brush the forward end of the part and area it resides in with a toothbrush and breakfree or what ever similar stuff you use, then work the part to it's up or down
    travel position with your finger and brush it clean, work it up and down a couple times and leave it lightly lubed.

    Reassemble the gun and your good to go. Any time you pull the trigger group do the same. You can usually get away with brushing the area with a tooth brush
    in between times when you do not pull the trigger group.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,882 Senior Member
    UPDATE:

    I pulled it apart today and it had been put together correctly and the O-ring is in good condition. However, it's bone dry. I plan to clean it up and lube it. Work and other obligations will probably keep me from test firing it for a few weeks though.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,941 Senior Member
    Clean, lube, shoot repeat!
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
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