A/C brand opinions needed, please.

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Replies

  • terminator012terminator012 Senior Member Posts: 3,125 Senior Member
    Yes, if it's too big it will cycle a lot. Unless you got a humidistat you really won't know. If after the unit kicks off it still feels sticky humid inside even at 70 degrees or it gets sticky feeling before it comes back on. The unit could be cycling to fast to draw all the humidity out. I have installed ones that were to big per customers request and they never complained. Some thermostats can be calibrated to cycled longer.
  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 37,968 Senior Member
    edited May 14 #33
    RugerFan said:
    This may sound stupid, but, how do I tell if it's too humid inside? 
    With a hygrometer. At least that's what measures humidity. Now whats considered humid.....beats me. 
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • terminator012terminator012 Senior Member Posts: 3,125 Senior Member
    cpj said:
    RugerFan said:
    This may sound stupid, but, how do I tell if it's too humid inside? 
    With a hygrometer. At least that's what measures humidity. Now whats considered humid.....beats me. 
    When the ac is running and it's so humid your drawls stick to your crack.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 17,546 Senior Member
    Or if the thermostat says you're at your set temp and you feel sticky/sweaty.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 1,552 Senior Member
    I don't feel like there's moisture in the house. I don't think it' cycling like that all the time. But I only ck'd it that 1 evening. Guess I'll try it again.

    According to our last appraisal,  the house is 2444 sq ft.  And it's a 5 ton unit. 
  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Posts: 725 Senior Member
    If it is too humid in the house you will know, you will be uncomfortable.  Like was mentioned, even at the set temperature you feel sticky or hot.  Longer runtimes reduce the humidity, if a system is oversized it will not run long enough to capture the moisture from the air.  Based on the slightly accurate rule of thumb for sizing I would say you are in the right ballpark on the size for the square footage.  However, the only proper way to size the system is through a load calculation that your contractor should have done (unless I hear otherwise, I will assume he did).  There are way too many factors involved to simply calculate based on square footage and get it right every time.
  • Big ChiefBig Chief Senior Member Posts: 31,709 Senior Member
    Hey, bottom line is are you comfortable in your house and it is working properly far as you can tell............if so and your electric bill goes down you have no complaints......Be Happy.
    It's only true if it's on this forum where opinions are facts and facts are opinions
    Words of wisdom from Big Chief: Flush twice, it's a long way to the Mess Hall
    I'd rather have my sister work in a whorehouse than own another Taurus!
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 16,569 Senior Member
    Something like this:


    Not a laboratory grade instrument by any means, but plenty close enough. I have two of them, two different brands, and they at least pretty much agree with each other.

    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    My Karma ran over your Dogma!
  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Posts: 725 Senior Member
    At that price just keep in mind that you get what you pay for.  Also, don't fall into the trap that too many Americans fall into and rely on instruments to tell them whether or not they are comfortable.  If your house feels comfortable to you, don't worry about the temperature or humidity.  Nothing drives AC service techs more insane than homeowners with cheap thermometers complaining that the expensive HVAC digital control on the wall does not agree with their cheap desk thermometer and therefore the expensive HVAC digital control must be wrong.  If it wasn't for the cheap desk thermometer telling them that they are uncomfortable, they would not have any complaints.  These are known in the HVAC industry as "nuisance calls".  There are many mind games HVAC technicians will play with customers to handle these calls.  The most common one is to pretend to make an adjustment while actually changing nothing.  Customer is convinced that the problem is solved and since there was nothing wrong to begin with, there are no more complaints.  A very common one in a commercial office building setting is to hide the thermostat somewhere (such as in a mechanical room that only building maintenance has access to) with a remote temperature sensor in the office space that nobody recognizes as part of the HVAC system.  A dummy thermostat is then placed in the space where anybody can access it.  The dummy thermostat gets adjusted all day long by everybody that decides they are uncomfortable and everybody is happy even though nothing was changed.  With the digital controls we have on the equipment my employer makes we have the ability to adjust the temperature sensor offset +- 5F in half degree increments.  I train my students that if they run into the situation where the customer is unhappy because the $250 controller does not agree with the customers $8 thermometer, adjust the $250 controller so that it matches the $8 thermometer.  Trying to convince the average customer that their $8 thermometer is inaccurate is a waste of time.  The actual accuracy of the controller does not matter as long as the customer is happy.  Word of advice from an experienced HVAC professional:  If you are hot, turn the thermostat down.  If you are cold, turn the thermostat up.  If you are comfortable, don't touch the thermostat! Don't get hung up on an arbitrary number that someone told you that you should be comfortable at.  Different people are comfortable at different temperatures and humidity levels.  Kind of like a one size fits all hat.....doesn't really fit anybody correctly.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 16,569 Senior Member
    Agreed there, 10Canyon. What the $8 hygrometer is good for is telling you the difference between 40% and 80% RH, a precision instrument it is not. With that said, they're "often" surprisingly accurate, within 2 or 3% of a "real one". But I wouldn't make life and death decisions with one for sure.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    My Karma ran over your Dogma!
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,211 Senior Member
    RugerFan said:
    According to our last appraisal,  the house is 2444 sq ft.  And it's a 5 ton unit. 

    Unless you have 12' ceilings, little shade on the house, and lots of tall windows on the sunlit side of the house, I would say that you have a little too much A/C. I've run enough manual J load calculations over the years to be able to get pretty close and the 500 sq ft per ton ratio was common in dry areas like Texas and Arizona. The cooling of a structure is by the removal of latent heat and to over simplify, that is the removal of the moisture in the air. Dry air takes more btu's to extract the moisture from a given volume of air. High humidity areas like the Florida coast average about 700 sq ft per ton on a normally designed house. Again, this is an average as custom homes with high ceilings and lots of glass will require more btu's because of increased heat load and volume.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 1,552 Senior Member
    The house is comfortable.  A new thermostat was installed. There is little shade. One room does have 10 ft.ceiling, but the rest are 8 ft. I'm thinking everything is fine, I've just got to get used to the nuances of this new system.
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