No draw.

earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,512 Senior Member
Unsuccessful this year.
First time sence the one time I took my stepson and ran camp for him and my Dad. I think I'm going to do a camp trip up above where I usually hunt in some hard terrain that doesn't attract a lot of hunters. Spend some time in the woods without having to stress about hurrying to get an elk, retrieve the meat, and get it back home so as not to miss a second weekend with my son. It's been several years sence I could just be in the woods and enjoy it for awhile without some deadline hanging over my head. This state, this city, the job, the ex, and host of other things has spent the last six years or so on my bad side. I could use some quiet for a few days. September's a nice time to be in the mountains.

Replies

  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,132 Senior Member
    Well, it sucks. But, I’m glad for you. 

    Enjoy the “chill” time. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,239 Senior Member
    Best way I can think of to relax. Hard physical exercise getting to the right place, then just empty your head and smile at some very simple stuff. I would need coffee and cigars, but you may be a little bit more 'pure.'
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 7,078 Senior Member
    I think you have the right attitude given the circumstances.  Take that time and enjoy every minute of it.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,512 Senior Member
    Thanks guys. Im looking forward to the trip.
  • RaptortrapperRaptortrapper Posts: 75 Member
    edited June 6 #6
    This is exactly why I'm thankful that I live in a state that offers multiple species to hunt.  I don't draw every tag every year, but I get at least one or two tags.  I have a buddy that lives out east, and if he doesn't get a deer tag, he doesn't get to hunt.  A lot of things about Colorado drive me nuts, but I do appreciate the hunting.  Elk, deer, bear, and moose are all within an hour of me.  Antelope is about 4 hours.  Not bad at all.
    Some people are like a slinky-- not much fun till you push them down the stairs!
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 20,132 Senior Member
    I miss the mountains and hunting muley and antegoats. 

    But, being able to hunt year round and not draw........I have to say is kinda nice. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,512 Senior Member
    Up by where I want to camp, I took a long hike last season before opening day. While standing well hidden in the shadows I watched a young 5× bull make his way towards me. He stepped out literally within reach before he noticed me. He wasn't sure what to do at that point so we had a little visit before his busy schedule called him away. For me that was just as exciting as putting the cow down the next day.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,239 Senior Member
    Up by where I want to camp, I took a long hike last season before opening day. While standing well hidden in the shadows I watched a young 5× bull make his way towards me. He stepped out literally within reach before he noticed me. He wasn't sure what to do at that point so we had a little visit before his busy schedule called him away. For me that was just as exciting as putting the cow down the next day.
    That is an unforgettable experience. I have not had one that comes close to that, but 30 years of slinking around the woods looking for very old land boundary evidence has put me in the midst of various wildlife in situations where they either did not know I was there, or didn't identify me as a threat. It is an amazing and wonderful thing to infiltrate into the average day of a wild animal, and then go your separate ways without anybody getting hurt. It's kind of like 'counting coup,' the way plains Indians used to do it - boldly touching the enemy, without shedding blood.

    I still love hunting, but the excitement of taking game is not greater than the exhilaration of mixing in with wildlife in its somewhat natural state. I've had more fun, more times, catching and releasing armadillos than I've had on many of my hunting experiences. Hunting just provides evidence for the stories you tell about your experiences, and some tasty eating, as well.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 2,512 Senior Member
    I agree. I've had vists with everthing from bear to coyotes to pine martins to birds landing on my hat.
  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 39,213 Senior Member
    bisley said:
    Up by where I want to camp, I took a long hike last season before opening day. While standing well hidden in the shadows I watched a young 5× bull make his way towards me. He stepped out literally within reach before he noticed me. He wasn't sure what to do at that point so we had a little visit before his busy schedule called him away. For me that was just as exciting as putting the cow down the next day.
    That is an unforgettable experience. I have not had one that comes close to that, but 30 years of slinking around the woods looking for very old land boundary evidence has put me in the midst of various wildlife in situations where they either did not know I was there, or didn't identify me as a threat. It is an amazing and wonderful thing to infiltrate into the average day of a wild animal, and then go your separate ways without anybody getting hurt. It's kind of like 'counting coup,' the way plains Indians used to do it - boldly touching the enemy, without shedding blood.

    I still love hunting, but the excitement of taking game is not greater than the exhilaration of mixing in with wildlife in its somewhat natural state. I've had more fun, more times, catching and releasing armadillos than I've had on many of my hunting experiences. Hunting just provides evidence for the stories you tell about your experiences, and some tasty eating, as well.
    That’s the prime motivation for me getting back to bow hunting this year. Gun season is a couple weekends of hurry up. Bow season is a few months of enjoying the outdoors, no matter the  outcome. 
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,239 Senior Member
    I never tried bow hunting when I was young enough to begin a new sport, from scratch. I had always had pretty meager return on my rifle efforts, and I didn't really understand how accurate and lethal a compound bow could be. I knew a guy that hunted very successfully with a long bow, which I could not shoot well, and I erroneously applied that experience to all bow hunting. He had rare abilities that I knew I didn't have, and it seemed like it would take a long time to see progress. Besides, I worked 50-60 hours a week in those days.
  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 39,213 Senior Member
    I used to shoot a LOT. And hunt a LOT. Then, marriage and kids. 

    I have a natural ability with a bow. With a compound bow using sights and a release, a golf ball was dead meat at 20 yards, and damned nervous at 30. I have zero doubt that after not shooting that bow for I’m guessing 10 years at least, I would drill a baseball sized target at 20 yards on the first shot.  Known distances were cake. It was the range estimating that got me. But, I accounted for that by marking yardage with ribbons in trees. 

    Now, I’ve thrown all that compound stuff out the window. I’ll be shooting a recurve bow. No sights. Just stick, string, and arrows.  Why? It’s intriguing. And enjoyable. Simple. Very little to go wrong.  I’ll not shoot as good as I can with a compound, but I’ll be good enough to hunt at 20 ish yards. 
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,235 Senior Member

    I did the archery thing for a few years and kinda lost interest in it.  Handgun hunting sparked my interest and bows just didn't do it for me.  I did archery deer one time and never took a shot.  Just had fun taking my bow for a walk.  Now, I'd rather strap a bandolier holster across my chest, throw my backpack on, grab my shooting sticks and take off walking.

    Year before last, my dad and a buddy both got an elk within one day of each other.  Dad took a nice bull that he as able to call in to within 30 yards.  Buddy took a cow at just over 70 yards.  Yes, they are good enough to make shots like that.  They practice at least once a week and practice out to at least 70 yards and they frequently shoot 3D competition.  That being said, as cpj mentions, range estimate is the key.  If you're off by 10 yards, it can make a big difference down range.  Buddy who shot the elk at 70 yards missed his range estimation on the first shot and put the arrow under her.  That shot gave him the dope he needed, the cow stated standing there, and the second arrow took out her heart and lungs.

  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 39,213 Senior Member
    I may know a guy....who put in the work at the range, marked distance with flags.... and used the 30 yard pin on a doe that was STANDING RIGHT UNDER, AND I MEAN RIGHT UNDER the 20 yard flag. That guy was an idiot. 
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 8,264 Senior Member
    cpj said:
    I may know a guy....who put in the work at the range, marked distance with flags.... and used the 30 yard pin on a doe that was STANDING RIGHT UNDER, AND I MEAN RIGHT UNDER the 20 yard flag. That guy was an idiot. 
    How much did you miss her by?
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 39,213 Senior Member
    Diver43 said:
    cpj said:
    I may know a guy....who put in the work at the range, marked distance with flags.... and used the 30 yard pin on a doe that was STANDING RIGHT UNDER, AND I MEAN RIGHT UNDER the 20 yard flag. That guy was an idiot. 
    How much did you miss her by?
    He shot right over her back. 
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.