Seating and crimping...1 step or 2?

TrueTone911TrueTone911 Senior MemberPosts: 6,022 Senior Member
I had a question about something in the Oregon Trail loading manual some time ago. I called and talked to, I think his name is John. Sure nice guy, answered all my questions. Said call back If I needed to.

He suggested that I would have better accuracy and less leading if I seated the bullet and crimped in separate steps. So...If loading lead bullets in handgun cartridges, do you set and crimp in 1 or 2 steps?
I refuse to join any club that would have me as a member.
Groucho Marx

Replies

  • BAMAAKBAMAAK Senior Member Posts: 4,199 Senior Member
    I use a FCD on all my reloads so 2 steps.  I've have heard you are supposed to roll crimp revolver cartridges but I don't even have a clue how to do that and have had good luck with a light to medium factory crimp.  I don't push lead very fast though.
    "He only earns his freedom and his life Who takes them every day by storm."

    -- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, German writer and politician
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 19,443 Senior Member
    Anytime I crimp, I do it in a second step with a Lee Factory Crimp Die. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • FisheadgibFisheadgib Senior Member Posts: 5,211 Senior Member
    When I first started reloading I seated and crimped in one step because I didn't know any better. After about a year, I started seating and crimping in separate steps.
    snake284 wrote: »
    For my point of view, cpj is a lot like me
    .
  • cpjcpj Senior Member Posts: 37,953 Senior Member
    Better accuracy and less leading? 
    I call Bull ****. I’d LOVE to know how that’s possible. 
    Heres my process, and the reason behind it. 
    I seat and crimp in two steps. Why ? My Lee turret press has four posistions. So it’s either make that fourth hole actually do something, or have to crank the handle just to move it past the empty hole. 
    Had I a single stage press, I’d seat and crimp in one step. 
    The one advantage to seating and crimping separate is you can change seating depth and level of crimp independent of each other. 
    "I'm here for the guns, hunting, and skirt wearing men."
    Zee
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 1,456 Senior Member
    Both.

    One step for cast lead bullet shallow crimp groove or light target loads.

    Two steps when I want a heavy roll crimp like a deep groove or jacketed heavy/high velocity load.

    The Lee FCD works great on my 45acp loads. I'd gladly use them on everything if I had the dies.
  • TrueTone911TrueTone911 Senior Member Posts: 6,022 Senior Member
    He said seating and crimping in one step can often shave the bullet a bit.
    I refuse to join any club that would have me as a member.
    Groucho Marx
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 17,539 Senior Member
    He said seating and crimping in one step can often shave the bullet a bit.
    I have experienced that in some cases
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 1,456 Senior Member
    He said seating and crimping in one step can often shave the bullet a bit.
    It shouldn't if the case is correctly belled. Maybe a tiny partial ring if too much crimp is applied. Takes some time to get a feel for belling and crimping and inconsistent case length can make it harder. I doubt I can shoot good enough to reap the penalties of any minor shaving or inconsistent crimps.
  • TrueTone911TrueTone911 Senior Member Posts: 6,022 Senior Member
    He said seating and crimping in one step can often shave the bullet a bit.
    It shouldn't if the case is correctly belled. Maybe a tiny partial ring if too much crimp is applied. Takes some time to get a feel for belling and crimping and inconsistent case length can make it harder. I doubt I can shoot good enough to reap the penalties of any minor shaving or inconsistent crimps.
    I have only been loading for...I dunno...less than 2 years? Still trying to get the feel for a proper crimp.
    I refuse to join any club that would have me as a member.
    Groucho Marx
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 1,456 Senior Member
    I'm still learning too. Even after however many years it's been. In spite of my own failings I've not had a bullet move from recoil or scatter wild hole dispersment on the target. You already know its important. That's the biggest thing I think.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,382 Senior Member
    2 steps. I tried 1 step in th e beginning, didn't like the results
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,053 Senior Member

    I do 2 steps.  Depending on the cartridge, I either use a Factory Crimp Die, or just use the seating die with the seating stem removed after the bullets are seated.

    When applying a heavy roll crimp, such as on a lead 454 Casull load where you don't want those bullets pulling, it is possible to have the case mouth shave lead at the end of the crimp.  As the case is crimped, the bell is reversed and starts to crimp as the bullet is still being seated that last little bit.  I've had it happen.  And I've had some inaccurate loads after that's happened.  Was it because if the shaved bullet?  I can't positively say that.  All I know is, lead shaved, groups where larger than I wanted.  But, that issue is exactly why I started seating and crimping in different steps.

  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 9,302 Senior Member
    Depends on the Die set.  Since my reloading stuff is a mish mosh that is picked up on the cheap, It is determined by the equipment.

    Like the Hornady American .223 die set I bought on Thursday.  Twenty something bucks... two die set, and it crimps when seating.  Nothing wrong with it so far, but I have not fired any of the loads I've made with it yet.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
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