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The most embarrassed you've been while hunting

JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior MemberPosts: 8,227 Senior Member

Paul's "most scared...." thread inspired this.  For some, such as the story Bisley posted, the most embarrassed and most scared may be the same.  For me, they're two different occasions.

Several years ago, while I was still living in Colorado, I was elk hunting in the mountains a few miles from my house.  Since they were close, I was staying at home and just getting up early to heading into the hills, and returning home at night.

One of those days, I stayed out a bit too late, had a little trouble finding my truck, but eventually got situated and drove home.  I tried calling home, but the cell phone reception was bad.  I did manage to speak briefly to Linefinder and asked him to let my wife know all was well and that I was just running late.

Apparently, that wasn't reassuring enough for her.  She called a friend, and she and her husband came over.  They call another friend, who also came over (another couple), and then called the sheriff.  When I got home, they were praying for me.  I didn't know if I should be glad, mad or embarrassed.  I think it was a little of all three.

To top things off, a little after I got home a deputy sheriff about half my age showed up and proceeded to lecture me on the dangers of hunting alone.  I told him I had only been doing that for about 30 years, but he continued the lecture.  I let him finish and "thanked" him for the advice.

Jerry

Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.

Replies

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,739 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #2
    I pulled down the two track one year to find my usual spot taken. I pulled down the road aways and started setting up my little pop-up camper. The guys that occupied my usual spot came walking down the road and stopped to chat. During our introductory small talk, a loud noise behind me drew shocked expressions on their faces. I turned around to see a huge aspen falling directly towards my camper. Late season rain that year had saturated the clay soil. A nearby tree caught the offending aspen before it could destroy my old Coleman. I felt like a fool, but was later redeemed when another ground soaked aspen hit their tent during a storm. Fortunately nobody was injured and we all likely take more care picking camp sites.

    Edit
    Ive been hunting alone for years too. No more dangerous than driving on a crowded freeway.
  • mitdr774mitdr774 Member Posts: 1,582 Senior Member
    About 10 years ago I did my one and only pronghorn trip out west.  I figured my other hunting rifles at the time had all had their chance so I decided to take my .300WM.  It had not been used for anything other than paper punching up to that point.  My shot was less than 100 yards and while the pronghorn did drop it was still twitching and kicking when we got to it.  I decided to put one through the spine by the base of the neck as I have done in the past.  Never had any issues before.  DO NOT let loose a .300WM round in very close proximity to anything that could potentially come back at you.  Instant hamburger and hair spatter all down my right side, on my brother in law about 25 feet behind and to my right, and on my dad abut 25 feet behind and to my left.  Lesson learned.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,188 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #4
    I was deer hunting in northern Michigan. I always carry a sidearm with me and that year I had my S&W Mountain Gun in 44 magnum. I was sitting down in a chair behind a tree overlooking a large cleared area. Being clever like I am, I kept the .44 mag in a cup holder in the chair so if I was in an awkward shooting position with my rifle, I could use that for a short range shot.

    After sitting out for an hour or so, I hear some leaves crunching from directly behind me and getting closer. I grabbed my revolver and slowly got into a position where I could shoot. Since I am left handed, I was reaching over my right shoulder (with the gun next to my ear) at the 3 deer that were heading straight toward me at 20 yards and closing.

    I missed by a mile. The deer just stood there for several seconds looking at me like was an idiot before they turned around an ran away. The concussion from the revolver was something that I never want to experience again. I ruptured my ear drum, and I am sure those deer had a good laugh about the dumb hunter for many more seasons to come.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,618 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #5
    Pheasant hunting in Kansas...I had clipped a rooster and the dogs finally found him in a tight little culvert where they couldn't get to him...so we leashed up the dogs and mu buddy had a tight hold on them...The rooster was still alive sitting there in the muddy little stream. I got the bright idea that I'd hit him with the edge of my pattern and take his head off....so I take aim and let go with my full choke barrel....it worked perfectly except for the cubic yard of mud that came back, showering me, my buddy and the dogs...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    I don't know if it qualifies as embarrassing, but it does qualify as funny. In 1998 I got a couple of Canada Goose tags. I KNEW the flight path the geese took coming back to the nuclear plant and knew exactly where to set up as I went fishing in the river below the dam several times to make sure of the spot I needed to be in. Since I was just fishing, and the geese were used to seeing people fishing the river, they didn't pay any attention to boats. I was tied up to the bank on the evening of the opening day fishing, and waiting for the geese to come in from feeding on the farms South of the plant. Shotgun was cased, loaded, and I was waiting for the geese to 'come home to roost'.

    A TWRA boat and a couple of officers happened by about the time the geese would be coming in. They asked to check my license and see/check any fish I'd caught. They didn't mention the gun case if they saw it; it was propped up on the middle seat of the boat in plain sight. Everything checked out and they started upriver to the dam about a half mile away to check licenses there. They hadn't gone more than a couple hundred yards when I heard and saw the geese coming in. I uncased the shotgun and when they were nearly over me at about 60 feet I cut loose. Got my two Canada Geese. Upped anchor and paddled out to get them, and noticed the TWRA boat was bearing down on me full throttle.

    "Let's see your license!" was the first thing they said. I pulled out my license again, and the goose tags, and handed the stuff to them. They figured out really fast that I was legal and had the license and tags for the geese. They handed back my license and tags and I put the tags on the geese. One of the officers asked, "Why didn't you tell us you were hunting?" I told him that they asked for my fishing license and to check my fish, and didn't ask about hunting, or the shotgun in the soft case. They weren't exactly amused about that answer.

    I didn't volunteer the information about hunting for one simple reason. I learned in the Navy to only answer the question asked, and to NEVER volunteer any additional information, or to volunteer for ANYTHING in general. Old habits die hard; I still do that not volunteering info outside the scope of the question, especially when the 'imperial authorities' are doing the questioning.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,249 Senior Member
    I think I was 17 or 18. I stopped at the bank to deposit some checks on the way to the cabin. Apparently I put my check book in my back pocket and didn’t take it out. It was the last evening of deer season. As I was walking in but probably out my check book fell out of my back pocket and onto the trail. 

    Flash foward ten months or so to opening day of deer season. On the walk out for lunch one of my buddies looks down and finds my check book I dropped at the end of last season!  By the time I got back to the cabin he had written checks for everyone for $1m dollars. They all had a great laugh and yes I was a bit embarrassed!  The kicker was this wasn’t the first time they had found something I had dropped!
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    A few season back, I had downed a doe on Pennsylvania's early antlerless muzzleloader season opening day.  I got to field dressing, and when it came time to ream out the doe's bung, I pulled out my ever-reliable Butt Out 2 rectum removal tool.  It's usually very fast and neat.  This time was a different story...

    For the life of me, I could not get the danged tool to go it.  After several failed attempts to get the Butt Out inserted, I took a step back and realized what was going on.  

    Yep.

    Wrong hole.

    Thank goodness I was alone.  I was giggling a little too hard at the thought of my name ending up on some PA game warden registry for indecent hunters.
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • NNNN Senior Member Posts: 24,954 Senior Member
    Nobody is there to see so it didn't happen
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    edited August 2018 #11

    cpj said:
    Six-Gun said:
    A few season back, I had downed a doe on Pennsylvania's early antlerless muzzleloader season opening day.  I got to field dressing, and when it came time to ream out the doe's bung, I pulled out my ever-reliable Butt Out 2 rectum removal tool.  It's usually very fast and neat.  This time was a different story...

    For the life of me, I could not get the danged tool to go it.  After several failed attempts to get the Butt Out inserted, I took a step back and realized what was going on.  

    Yep.

    Wrong hole.

    Thank goodness I was alone.  I was giggling a little too hard at the thought of my name ending up on some PA game warden registry for indecent hunters.
    That’s good, and embarrassing, but it will NEVER top the “other story””.  At least in the humor department. 
    That “other story” generated at least a month worth of random, inappropriately-timed laughs at workafter we got back from the trip.  Did I tell you that we ran I to that good Sumaratin the following year on the same stretch of public restroom...I mean...road?
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,485 Senior Member
    Bucket. Nuff said.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member
    Bucket. Nuff said.

    Mike

    That's one story I'm very glad I was not there to witness :)
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,429 Senior Member
    Bucket. Nuff said.

    Mike
    Ah, I forget, can you remind us of this story? LOL!!!
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • MileHighShooterMileHighShooter Senior Member Posts: 4,871 Senior Member
    Planned on shooting long for antegoats, zero'd at 300. Only chance at a buck came at about 75 yards. Spent a good hour or two with the guide getting into a spot to intercept the herd. Shot over his back. Buck bedded down 25 yards on the wrong side of a fence, mocking us all day. 
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Once again, please refrain from cutting short any baseless totally emotional arguments with facts. It leads to boring, completely objective conversations well beyond the comprehension ability of many.
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,155 Senior Member
    Planned on shooting long for antegoats, zero'd at 300. Only chance at a buck came at about 75 yards. Spent a good hour or two with the guide getting into a spot to intercept the herd. Shot over his back. Buck bedded down 25 yards on the wrong side of a fence, mocking us all day. 
    The 300 yard zero for antelope seems to be the kiss of death.  My buddy Rich, a regular on our Montana hunt, did the exact same thing you did, to the letter, on a antelope doe.  We stalked in from way out and got within 75 yards of his target.  He rose up, lined her up, and fired right over her back.  Yup. He had a 300 yard zero and the bullet sizzled right over her.  We re-zeroed him in the field to 200 yards and that didn't happen on the next one,
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,227 Senior Member

    The closest shot I've ever got at a speed goat was 50-75 yards.  I had been sitting down, leaning against a corner fence post, and had fall asleep.   I woke up and a doe was standing about 50-75 yards away.

    I missed her.  I overshot.

    There was a small buck that I missed 3 times in a row.  I thought it was at least 350-400 yards away, and was holding over it.  On the third shot, I saw dirt fly about a hundred yards past it.  I then realized I had misjudged the distance, and made the 4th shot dead on.  At the shot, it took of like a scalded owl and piled up at the fence line a few hundred yards from where I hit it.

    I have since come to the conclusion that  a good rangefinder is a goat hunter's best friend.  Don't leave home without it.

    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
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