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Barrel Heat Sink

KurtKurt New MemberPosts: 21 New Member
One day, while sitting at the range, waiting for my rifle to cool, it occurred to me that many machines use heat sinks to provide more efficient cooling. I know that fluting the exterior of a rifle barrel adds more surface area and promotes cooling but was wondering if there had ever been any development of an exterior barrel heat sink for a common hunting platform?
“The rifle is a weapon. Let there be no mistake about that. It is a tool of power, and thus dependent completely upon the moral stature of its user.”
Col. Jeff Cooper

Replies

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,280 Senior Member
    Would a military heat shield or civilian ventilated rib qualify?
  • BAMAAKBAMAAK Senior Member Posts: 4,484 Senior Member
    If you're hunting with a rifle, how many shots do you need that you're heating up the barrel?  Seems like more weight to haul around.
    "He only earns his freedom and his life Who takes them every day by storm."

    -- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, German writer and politician
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,280 Senior Member
    Might heat up pretty good on a prairie dog hunt?
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,289 Senior Member
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • jbp-ohiojbp-ohio Senior Member Posts: 10,266 Senior Member
    I think if it was a viable idea, the military would have them.
    "The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." Thomas Jefferson
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,289 Senior Member
    jbp-ohio said:
    I think if it was a viable idea, the military would have them.
    At one point they did.

    On the 1895 Colt-Browning machine gun.
    "Another improvement was the addition of a breech-to-muzzle aluminum heat sink, with lengthwise fins and covering some 270° of the gun barrel's outer circumference's upper areas, to dissipate heat. Most Marlin M1917 and M1918 guns saw use in aircraft as defensive armament --"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M1895_Colt–Browning_machine_gun

    I think if it's just for use at the range or light hunting applications, a barrel fan would do the job.



    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Battery powered air mattress inflator, 25 foot garden hose, a cooler filled with ice and water, and the garden hose, and a 3/4" to 3/8" copper reducer fitting. Inflator blows air through cheap (read THIN) garden hose immersed in ice bath. Air exits the copper reducer fitting into the chamber area and pushes COLD air through barrel. You need to make two holes towards the top of the cooler for hose inlet and exit and have enough hose hanging out the outlet end to stick it in the chamber.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,293 Senior Member
    Saw a rig that used a CO2 fire extinguisher....not actually sure if that kind of cooling did more harm than good though...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,646 Senior Member
    Wasn't that the reasoning behind the fins on the classic Thompson?
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • JKPJKP Senior Member Posts: 2,331 Senior Member
    Or just bring several rifles and rotate shooting them while barrels cool...
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 24,183 Senior Member
    Keep a bucket of ice water handy. Dip as needed!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Cooling of the barrel can be done several ways. Depends on how much trouble you're willing to go to to get that cooling. The cheapest way is compressed air. Compressed air escaping a small orifice is much cooler than ambient air. Placing a tube with a very small orifice at the end of the chamber and letting compressed air escape from a tank through the orifice tube at the chamber will cool a barrel fairly rapidly. The escaping air from the orifice also draws in a LOT of ambient air to help remove heat. If your range has electrical outlets then a small pancake compressor and tank can provide all the air you need. Rule of thumb is that orifice should be no greater than 1/64" in diameter. That releases a sufficient amount of air for rapid cooling and doesn't drag down the compressor tank pressure fast.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    There's a LOT of difference between running 75-80 psi from a compressor, and 2000+ psi from one of those SCUBA tanks. Anyway, the jet of air from that tiny orifice draws in about 10-20x the volume of ambient air so condensation really isn't going to be a problem, unless it's raining.

    I had to fill the SCBA tanks at the plant for the firefighting air packs. Out of something like 70 people in my rating I was 1 of 9 that were certified to fill the tanks. It was on a volunteer basis only to get certified. It was a good job in an air conditioned space, and when you were filling tanks you couldn't be pulled to do other stupid work.  Fiberglass wrapped aluminum tanks on the Scott Air packs. They went in a water bath inside very heavy wall pipes inside a reinforced concrete room, in case they exploded, and one would go off every once in a while. They got hot being filled, hence the water bath cooling. I'd suspect SCUBA tanks are filled in much the same way.

      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,646 Senior Member
    tennmike said:
     I'd suspect SCUBA tanks are filled in much the same way.

    It would depend on the shop.
    When I was diving a lot, some would put the tanks in a tank of water, and others would just have them sitting on the ground.
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,289 Senior Member
    knitepoet said:
    tennmike said:
     I'd suspect SCUBA tanks are filled in much the same way.

    It would depend on the shop.
    When I was diving a lot, some would put the tanks in a tank of water, and others would just have them sitting on the ground.
    Yep, a lot depends on how quickly you fill them.

    Also, at a garage I worked at many moons ago, the compressor which operated the vehicle lift (operating at 300 psi) had to be drained nightly from a small bleeder valve at the bottom. It was a humid area.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    The higher the pressure you put in a tank, and the speed you fill it, the more heat generated during the fill. Just the opposite of releasing pressure from a high pressure tank. Those air molecules getting packed in there and rubbing on each other cause some heat!
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
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