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257 roberts fans

WORLD TWORLD T MemberPosts: 262 Member
Who in here is a 257 Roberts fan? A buddy of mine wants to sell me his Browning 257 Roberts. I have never shot that caliber. Good whitetail caliber?
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Replies

  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,851 Senior Member
    It make a fine deer/speed goat rifle. pretty much anything a 6mm will do can also be accomplished with the 257 roberts.
    The very first big game animal I ever killed was a pronghorn at a little under 300 yards with a 257 roberts AI custom made by my dad on a Springfield action as I recall. If it were not for the fact that it was built for someone else, I would own that rifle now.
    I will add one to the collection one day and it will be a Browning BLR 81 when I do. Already have brass and dies.

    Sako
  • WORLD TWORLD T Member Posts: 262 Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    I have never fired one. But, I'm sure it is perfectly adequate for whitetail. It won't add any capability that you don't already have, though. Not that that is an important issue. I mean, come on, I have long since passed 'need'.

    I have long passed the "need" phase also. Just trying something new. Like that Kimber Montana 257 also. One can always use another Kimber. :)
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    WORLD T wrote: »
    Who in here is a 257 Roberts fan? A buddy of mine wants to sell me his Browning 257 Roberts. I have never shot that caliber. Good whitetail caliber?

    in my opinion as a pure white tail or maybe an antelope cartridge it is hard to beat. Of course mine is a .257 AI (Ackley Improved). But I've always heard that they were great whitetail cartridges in the original Roberts version. Nowadays with better powders and bullets they are even better and one feature people like about the Roberts over the two 6mms, the .243 Winchester and 6MM Remington is that they will shoot heavier bullets well. Also another fine old quarter bore, the .250 Savage is pretty good in its own right. I have one of those too but not an AI, the original .250 Savage. I shoot 117 grain Hornady's or Sierra Game Kings at about 2750 to 2800 FPS. That makes it a pretty good 300+yard deer rifle. And the Roberts is a bit more potent than that.

    This was edited on Jan. 23rd, at 9:40 AM due to some minor spelling issues and words left out.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    As I posted last week regarding Finn Aagard's observation that...
    "Although we have a generous --- perhaps superfluous --- abundance of rifle cartridges, it is interesting to note that with only a few exceptions, the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.)
    Finn Aagaard -- American Rifleman, December 1986

    I see that it's now being used as a sig ….. but I digress.

    The same can be said regarding 25 calibers. Aagards comparison can be made for the 25 calibers being slightly aberrant 6.5 mm's whose bullets are .007" undersize. When I had a 25-06, 120 gr. bullets were the heavyweights. Whereas the .007" larger .264" bullets get up to the 160 gr. range. 250 savage, 257 Roberts, & other 25 calibers are great combo whitetail, antelope, varmint rounds. But as Finn would probably have surmised, "it's just an aberrant 6.5mm".
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,425 Senior Member
    Like SD, my first ever big game animal (antelope) was killed with a 257AI. Before that, many pd's fell to that rifle.
    I don't have a 25 now, as I tend to lean to the 6mm, 6.5, or 7mm bores.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • justin10mmjustin10mm Senior Member Posts: 688 Senior Member
    Big fan here, even though I've never fired one.

    For Texas hunting the .257 Roberts is perfectly suitable for just about everything we have here save for maybe some of the very large exotics like Nilgai, but even that is questionable when you factor in the 120gr. Nosler Partition. The argument could be made that the .257 Roberts is THE perfect hunting cartridge for Texas.
  • WORLD TWORLD T Member Posts: 262 Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    I just sold my #1 in .257 Roberts (another safe queen) but at some point I'll be getting a new one in a configuration that is more suitabe to hard use. Wonderful soft shooting and great deer round Love the .257 Roberts..

    I knew I could count on Wambli to have one. I was looking at the Ruger #1 or a Kimber Montana in 257 Roberts. How accurate was that Ruger you had sir?
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    Somebody get a rope!

    Nope, you can't hang Wambli over this, because by the time you got the noose made, he'd have another one in the safe, :rotflmao::rotflmao::rotflmao:
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • gunwalkergunwalker Member Posts: 478 Member
    When I was a kid some friends of my family took me deer hunting and introduced me to the 257. It was the first rifle I ever shot from a bench and it was selected because of low recoil.That particular rifle had been made for the lady of the house who was petite. She loved that gun and because of the ease of handling and low recoil,she was an excellent shot. Many deer fell to that gun.
    Don't pass up a chance to own one.
    We do not view the world as it is, but as we perceive it to be.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    gunwalker wrote: »
    When I was a kid some friends of my family took me deer hunting and introduced me to the 257. It was the first rifle I ever shot from a bench and it was selected because of low recoil.That particular rifle had been made for the lady of the house who was petite. She loved that gun and because of the ease of handling and low recoil,she was an excellent shot. Many deer fell to that gun.
    Don't pass up a chance to own one.

    Great writeup on the virtues of the .257 Roberts Gunwalker. I am proud to be the owner of a custom built .257 Roberts AI. I still have some minor feed issues, but I am confident that my gun smith and I will work them out. It will feed, but requires a bit of man handling to get the cartridge to chamber.

    Also, welcome back to the forum.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    shooter wrote: »
    As I posted last week regarding Finn Aagard's observation that...
    "Although we have a generous --- perhaps superfluous --- abundance of rifle cartridges, it is interesting to note that with only a few exceptions, the true general purpose big-game cartridges used in this country come in but two calibers, .30 and 7mm. (the .270 Win. is merely a slightly aberrant 7mm whose bullets are .007" undersize.)
    Finn Aagaard -- American Rifleman, December 1986

    I see that it's now being used as a sig ….. but I digress.



    The same can be said regarding 25 calibers. Aagards comparison can be made for the 25 calibers being slightly aberrant 6.5 mm's whose bullets are .007" undersize. When I had a 25-06, 120 gr. bullets were the heavyweights. Whereas the .007" larger .264" bullets get up to the 160 gr. range. 250 savage, 257 Roberts, & other 25 calibers are great combo whitetail, antelope, varmint rounds. But as Finn would probably have surmised, "it's just an aberrant 6.5mm".

    I'm a little puzzled by your response and reference to Aagaard and his choice of cartridges because this thread has nothing to do with a .270. It's about another great classic American cartridge, the .257 Roberts. And I don't see a need to start a controversy between a 7mm and a .270. That argument will not do anything to prove or disprove the virtues of a Bob or any other cartridge. You'll get no argument from me on either of them. I like em both. but I will comment on it. For one thing, as much respect as I had for Aagaard, he wasn't raised in the U.S. and he hunted mainly in his native Kenya for most of his life until hunting was outlawed there in 1977 and he migrated to the U.S. Aagaard was actually a very simple man and he saw things in a simple light. He didn't believe in a bunch of calibers just for the sake of variety, so the ones he grew up with were what he considered adequate as they certainly were and the 7x57 filled the niche for him that a .270 filled for me and many other Americans, not that the 7x57 hasn't filled a similar niche for some Americans as well. It has and this forum is proof of that. It, the 7x57 is a great and classic cartridge made in some of the greatest most classic rifles in America and Europe. But so is a .270 Winchester. And I suspect Aagaard knew this. But he felt more comfortable and at home with what he grew up with, which is totally human and normal. We do the same thing. So whatever you grew up with is what you're probably most comfortable with.

    Actually, the 7mm Mauser was never really that big a deal here until the 60s-70s when companies such as Ruger introduced the 7mm Mauser in their newer rifles. The fact that it was a very classical cartridge in some parts of the world, mainly Europe and Africa fueld the fire for its rise in popularity with the advent of the Ruger 77 and the importation of some older Mausers. However, here in the U.S., the .270 Win. has enjoyed that level of popularity since it was introduced in 1925. Not to knock the 7x57. It's a great cartridge in its own right. In a modern rifle it can exceed performance of a 7mm08, not by much but with 2-3 grains more powder capacity, it does, just as the 6mm Remington can exceed the performance of a 243, again, in a strong modern rifle. It's the same comparison on the same case, the 6mm Remington coming from the .257 Roberts, which came from the 7x57 Mauser. But to say the 7x57 was more popular here than the .270 is ludicris. It just ain't so and never was. Like I said, this is not to knock its credibility, but only to state the facts. They are what they are.


    And there ain't no magic with any cartridge or bullet diameter. You can take a 25-06 and if you have the manufacturing capabilities you can make a 150 grain bullet. However when you do then you have to tighten the rifling twist rate in the barrel. It's the same thing with a .270 Winchester. A 7mm bullet has no magic spell of superiority over a .277 bullet. That's ridiculous to even insinuate such a claim. The only difference in the two is .007 inches diameter. I don't know, and frankly don't really care why bullet makers don't make a .277 Spitzer with a high BC and heavier than 150 grains. They could do this, no problem. But evidently there is no market for it. Not to say there is no market for a .270 bullet because the facts show otherwise. The .270 is very popular. It's just that the 7mm has always been made in heavier weights and people have grown to accept this fact and not enough have pleeded the case of heavier bullets to warrant the bullet makers to make heavier ones for the .270 Winchester, just as they have never fought for heavier .25 caliber bullets than the 120 grain. People are satisfied with the weights of bullets available for their .25-06s and their .257 Roberts. They get the job done. And the two most popular weights that .270 bullets are made in seem to take care of 99% of the gun owning public's perceived needs in that chambering as they are with the more standard .25 cal. Weights. And actually, if you look further you will see that a majority of .270 Win. shooters prefer the lighter 130 grain bullet for deer because of the velocities it can achieve. So as far as the public is concerned, heavier bullets aren't in demand And so therefore, tighter twist barrels aren't in demand either. It would be no big deal for a company like Shilen to manufacture a 1-9 or even 1-8 twist barrel for the .270. But there's no demand for it.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,816 Senior Member
    WORLD T wrote: »
    Who in here is a 257 Roberts fan? A buddy of mine wants to sell me his Browning 257 Roberts. I have never shot that caliber. Good whitetail caliber?

    I only have one comment.

    You're going to have to learn to refer to it as the "257 Bob".
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,711 Senior Member
    I'm sure it would be a great choice for deer and speed goats. However, given ammo availability, I don't personally see what practical advantage it has over the .243 Winchester. Does .014" and 20grs make that much difference in something that is probably going to be a 300-yard gun anyway?
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,425 Senior Member
    Both do a great job, as will a host of others for deer and antelope.
    Primarily preference or what you have confidence in.
    I'm sure it would be a great choice for deer and speed goats. However, given ammo availability, I don't personally see what practical advantage it has over the .243 Winchester. Does .014" and 20grs make that much difference in something that is probably going to be a 300-yard gun anyway?
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    I agree with Aagaard.

    You would in that respect, because you are very predictable.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    I'm sure it would be a great choice for deer and speed goats. However, given ammo availability, I don't personally see what practical advantage it has over the .243 Winchester. Does .014" and 20grs make that much difference in something that is probably going to be a 300-yard gun anyway?

    Yes. In those bullet weight ranges and velocities, 20 grains is a lot.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,425 Senior Member
    20 grains?
    I though the max weight for the 25 cal bullets was 120 grains. Haven't kept up though with the 25.
    I use 115 grain bullets in one of my 6mm's.
    snake284 wrote: »
    Yes. In those bullet weight ranges and velocities, 20 grains is a lot.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    20 grains?
    I though the max weight for the 25 cal bullets was 120 grains. Haven't kept up though with the 25.
    I use 115 grain bullets in one of my 6mm's.

    I know they make them Ernie, but the standard rifle in 6mm doesn't really come with a twist tight enough for that heavy a bullet. Besides, around here you'd have to special order a 6mm bullet that heavy. And if I want a bullet that heavy, for what I do, I'll just use a quarter bore.

    But don't get me wrong. I'm not totally against 6mms. I like em. I had a 6mm Remington and I'm planning on building another one. They work well on whitetail deer and I would guess on antelope (thought iv'e never shot one). But I was only answering SS3's response that I feel 20 grains in those bullets can make a big difference in some situations.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,851 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    Yes. In those bullet weight ranges and velocities, 20 grains is a lot.

    Not so much that anyone or anything would notice really. I was on the Federal ammo site looking at slug data so I took a look at thier data on these two.
    To save time and typing I will just note the 300 yard stats
    .243 win 100gr nosler part Win 2171 fps and 1047 fpe, 8.2" wind [email protected], and 13.4" drop
    .257 rob 120gr nosler part 2140 fps and 1220 fpe, 8.2" wind [email protected], and 13.9" drop and this was a +P load.

    Other than fpe they are near equal to a point that a deer shot with ether one is not going to be any deader.
    Sako
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,425 Senior Member
    Factory guns that is likely true. Again, I don't keep up on factory specs.
    World T, If you want the Bob, buy it and enjoy it
    Little OT:
    Companies like McGowen make it easy and relatively inexpensive for someone to get a great barrel chambered with a twist rate they want.
    DTAC's are not hard to get and they work good on game, at least for me anyways.
    Picking the right bullet construction for your velocity range and placing it where it belongs (good field marksmanship) is more important on deer sized game when you are talking 6mm on up.
    I have never felt under-gunned with big Kansas Whitetails, Mule Deer, Antelope with my 6-284 or my 6x47 Lapua.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,823 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    but the standard rifle in 6mm doesn't really come with a twist tight enough for that heavy a bullet.

    I've got two targets, shot back to back, with three shots in about a .25" group out of a Stevens 200 .243 Win shooting 105 grain V-max's. But I haven't shot anything bigger than that out of it. 107gr is as big as I've seen avaialble. Not sure how much longer the bullet would be than my V-max's, but I'm sure I could get something to work in the 1" range at least. Can't get much more of a standard rifle that the Stevens. I'd have no problem with a .25 of any flavor, really. So this is kindof a sidetrack to the thread.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member

    Picking the right bullet construction for your velocity range and placing it where it belongs (good field marksmanship) is more important on deer sized game when you are talking 6mm on up.

    This I totally agree with you on. In fact, I would say that with a 6mm or smaller cartridge bullet placement is even more important.

    I mean, around here since a .224 or even .223 diameter cartridge is legal for deer, but to be successful you really need to concentrate on bullet placement. There's been many a whitetail killed with 22 rim fire, back in the old days before they made it illegal, but shot placement and keeping the range in mind were both very important.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,711 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Now the whole exercise of the .257 Scooter was to get a hunting class 100gr bullet at or close to 2800fps in a mini action with a HIGHLY efficient case and we succeeded so that takes care of my "need" for a .257 Roberts class gun.

    My 6mm v. .257 comment aside, someday I WILL have a .257 Scooter, I already have the donor rifle ready to go.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    BPsniper wrote: »
    As are you, Pot.
    I can relate to that! As Patten told the Russians when their respective fronts met up in Germany, when the Russian officer proposed a toast to him and Patten said he wouldn't drink with the Russian, the Russian called him an SOB. Patten then said OK I can Drink to That, One SOB to Another, and they did. LOL!!!

    So as one Pot calling the Kettle black, in return I can drink to that!!! (Well I would, but I no longer drink.)
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    snake284 wrote: »
    I'm a little puzzled by your response and reference to Aagaard and his choice of cartridges because this thread has nothing to do with a .270. It's about another great classic American cartridge, the .257 Roberts. And I don't see a need to start a controversy between a 7mm and a .270. That argument will not do anything to prove or disprove the virtues of a Bob or any other cartridge. You'll get no argument from me on either of them. I like em both. but I will comment on it. .
    It's what's referred to as an analogy. I'm making a comparison. The .007" inch difference between 7mm and .277" is identical with the .007" difference between .257" and .264". The smaller diameters lack a considerable percentage weight reduction. That's the point. I'm not putting down any cartridge, merely stating facts. These are not my thoughts alone; I tried to relate a well respected author in my statement.

    Dr. Wayne Van Zwoll has authored a book "Deer Rifles & Cartridges" , which I've read several times. In it, on pg. 152, he states " There's no reason for the .277" bullet. By the time the Winchester cartridge had arrived in 1925, the 7x57 Mauser was 32 years old.

    So you question why the 270 comes up in the conversation??? It's exactly the same thing. We have embraced two cartridge diameters that the rest of the world ignores (for the most part). Each of those diameters are on the small side. .257 vs. 264 and .277 vs. 284.

    I don't want to argue the merits of the respective cartridges. That's been done many, many times. If you're happy with your 257 Bob with a 120 gr. bullet and I can do the same thing with my 120 gr. or 130 gr. bullet in my .260 Rem. or 6.5x55mm then so be it.

    I introduced the Aagard quote to make a point about bullets, not cartridge calibers. The thread was about 257 Bob and I chimed in with a comment that was relative to the discussion. There is a .007" difference between the 257 and 264. That's exactly the same as for 277 and 284. Therein lies the comparison.

    Am I slamming the 270?? Hell no.
    Am I slamming the 257?? No way…..

    I was only trying to point out that we are uniquely associated with those two caliber dimensions in this country. That's not bad, I'm just stating facts.

    I have successfully competed in 1000 yd. benchrest for several years. I'm a late comer to the sport. But I've never seen a competitor shooting a bullet of .277" or .257". That's just an observation.

    Please, before telling me that we're not talking about competition, why is that??????????? Simply that by going up .007" you have a huge selection of high quality, aerodynamic, ballistically efficient projectiles that are not available in the smaller diameter! (And that applies to.257" and .277".) Wouldn't that be good for a hunting situation?

    I'm not bashing any caliber. This is a forum for expression of opinions. I'll side with Van Zwoll and Aagard. Not that I can't think for myself, but because their observations seem pertinent, logical and right on the money.
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    Wambli Ska wrote: »
    Like many #1s it would shoot the two first shots out of a cold bore nice and tight to each other (touching if I did my part) with just about any ammo I tried in it, and then the 3rd shot would wander off to just about MOA. There are a bunch of ways folks have deviced to make #1s shoot 3 shot groups well. I never cared at all because if I had it my way groups in hunting rigs would all be measured in 2 shot groups from a cold bore. Unless we are discussindga a pdog rig I have NEVER had the need (or the time) to take 3 shots at any game I've hunted.

    Now the whole exercise of the .257 Scooter was to get a hunting class 100gr bullet at or close to 2800fps in a mini action with a HIGHLY efficient case and we succeeded so that takes care of my "need" for a .257 Roberts class gun. BUT I do have a soft spot in my heart for the ol' .257 Bob and will probably end up building one in the future. Thinking a Montana Stainless action with a pencil barrel in a Lone Wolf Stock at something like 5.5 lbs.

    wambli that is the soundest advice I've heard here in a long time. A Bob is primarily a hunting rifle. In a hunting rifle the first shot is definitely most important, and from a cold bore. And it's nice to have a second shot ready. After that, the chances of doing any good with a third shot are way removed from the first two shots. Besides, if it will stay in MOA for three shots it will still be effective.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    I really wasn't slamming your statements, but trying to reason them out. I get it now about the .007 difference. But my main point is that like I said, Finn Aagaard wasn't raised here in the hay day of the first half of the 20 century. In Africa European cartridges ruled. He was of European roots. If there is no reason for the .270 then why is it so popular? Again, the 7mms were not as popular for most of the 20th century here in this country. I remember as a kid growing up here in Texas you hardly heard of a 7mmx57, except in a mil surp rifle, and the 7mm08 was not yet a standardized cartridge. It was still a wild cat known as the 7mm-308. There was also no 280 factory cartridge, only the 7mm-06, which is not quite the same case as the .280 Remington you see now days because Remington when they standardized the case lengthened it from the base to the shoulder by about .050 to prevent chambering in .270 Winchester Rifles. So to say there is no reason for a .270 Winchester because the 7mms were here first, just doesn't click with me. The .270 Win. was and is still more popular. Even now, the .270 Win. still outsells the .7mm-08 and the 7mmx57. This would tell me that there is a good reason for the .270s being. I know there's not a lot of practical difference in the 4 rounds, 7x57-7mm-08, .270 Win.,and the .280 Rem. but being that the .270 was more popular for so long I don't think you can say there's no reason for it. There was a reason in that it filled a niche before the others caught on in this country.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    [QUOTE=snake284;76882So to say there is no reason for a .270 Winchester because the 7mms were here first, just doesn't click with me. The .270 Win. was and is still more popular. Even now, the .270 Win. still outsells the .7mm-08 and the 7mmx57. This would tell me that there is a good reason for the .270s being. I know there's not a lot of practical difference in the 4 rounds, 7x57-7mm-08, .270 Win.,and the .280 Rem. but being that the .270 was more popular for so long I don't think you can say there's no reason for it. There was a reason in that it filled a niche before the others caught on in this country.[/QUOTE]

    I didn't say it.... just agreed with it. FWIW.. I submit the following from one of my favorite books.

    Complete Guide to Cartridge Reloading by Phillip B. Sharpe, 1935 ed. ;

    This book is a true classic in every sense of the word. Sharpe was one of the leading firearms & cartridge authorities of the first half of the last century. He collaborated with Smith & Wesson and Winchester to help D.B. Wesson develop the .357 magnum. They chornographed his handholds for it and a photo is included in the book of Colonel Wesson testing the loads from a machine rest. Phil Sharpe was acquainted with other noted firearms authorities of the period and regularly collaborated with them.

    It is most interesting to read his cartridge descriptions and I've read all of my reloading manuals from cover to cover many times over. This book has been with me for more decades than I care to count, but I'd like to share some of his thoughts on the 257 Roberts. He says, in part…. "As loaded commercially, there are three available bullet weights, 87, 100, and 117. Commercial bullets are a poor shape of hollow point, but despite this awkward shape, deliver excellent accuracy and good ballistics. When I was discussing the bullet shape with Major Roberts, he told me that he had experimented with a great many types of spritzer bullets and was unable to get reasonable accuracy. Incidentally, he demands that his .257 loads shot 10 consecutive shots in a one-inch group at 100 yards , not occasionally, but most of the time, wind and weather being favorable. Major Roberts admits, however, that a spitzer bullet would be far more satisfactory if an accurate one could be designed, and several of the ammunition makers are now working on this angle."

    So you see, there was a scarcity of good bullets back then in .257 caliber! Sharpe not only knew Roberts, but collaborated with him. That's why it seems unusual to develop a cartridge for a bullet caliber that has a scarcity of good bullets available. The same can be said for .277 caliber as well. And it was Dr. Van Zwoll who said there is no reason for a 270 Winchester, not me. However, I do agree with his statement.

    FWIW, Sharpe says the 7mm Mauser was "very popular" and "at present no less than fifteen different nations use this cartridge as standard." He goes on to say that he is quite fond of it and uses it regularly for hunting. "Properly loaded, this cartridge leaves very little to be desired, as it permits of excellent killing power of small game, or big game, together with the accuracy necessary for target shooting."

    His thoughts on the 6.5 Mannlicher-Schoenauer are also noteworthy. "The 6.5mm MS is an extremely popular number in this country."

    Keep in mind that Sharpes comments are from a 1935 text. That's why VanZwoll and Aagaard seem to have opined what they did regarding O'connor's favorite cartridge.
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • shootershooter Senior Member Posts: 1,186 Senior Member
    sorry, double post.
    There's no such thing as having too much ammo, unless you're on fire or trying to swim!
  • misdememisdeme New Member Posts: 1 New Member
    My husband is a huge fan of the Browning 257 Roberts. Last year hubby battled cancer, meanwhile I was dealing with bill collectors. Sadly I lost his rifle to a pawn shop. I would love to buy this particular gun if possible. Please contact me at [email protected]
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