Home Main Category General Firearms

Rifle build, if you had your choice

Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior MemberPosts: 2,435 Senior Member
This is a hypothetical discussion a buddy and I had but wanted to get your thoughts???

Let's say you want to build a custom .270 win (this will make Snake happy) hunting rifle from the ground up.   Custom action or your Rem 700 action you already have, SS barrel from your choice of barrel manufactures, trigger and stock and what have you.  Yes we could use just about any caliber here!

You've researched gunsmiths and you come down to two who have impeccable reputations for building outstanding rifles.

One gunsmith uses a standard lathe and milling machine to do his work.  The other gunsmith uses all of the latest CNC equipment for his builds.

If the price for the rifle builds were the same, which builder would you choose?

Yes a very loaded questions with tons of variables but I'm trying to keep it as simple as possible!

Thoughts?
Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

John 3: 1-21

Replies

  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 25,034 Senior Member
    If the price for the rifle builds were the same, which builder would you choose?
    Probably the guy with the lathe, on the ASS-U-ME-ption that he's been doing it for 10,000 years - in any event, all other things being completely equal (and we know they never are), I'd go with the older guy.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
    )O(
  • ShannonHayesShannonHayes Posts: 211 Member
    edited May 2019 #3
    I'd choose a custom action, Green Mtn barrel, custom wood stock, Timney trigger, and the older guy with the lathe. But that's JMHO.
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,526 Senior Member
    Wouldn't go the CNC route
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,762 Senior Member
    Guy with the CNC, hands down, every time.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,526 Senior Member
    That being said, for hunting rifle (Especially a 270 since it's range is so short), it wouldn't matter :D
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    I would likely use some other seemingly strange criteria for making my decision. Like what smith lived closer or had a faster delivery time or said something meaningful.
  • timctimc Senior Member Posts: 6,684 Senior Member
    Did this one a about 10 years ago, has been my favorite hunter ever since.
    Schiller 26” #3 varmint contour barrel chambered in .308.
    Remington 700 action
    surgeon bottom metal with A/I 10 round mag
    Timney trigger
    custom Hogue stock with full aluminum bed block
    glass bedded action
    nightforce Steel rings
    Leupold VX3 6.5-20x50mm LR scope



    timc - formerly known as timc on the last G&A forum and timc on the G&A forum before that and the G&A forum before that.....
    AKA: Former Founding Member
  • FFLshooterFFLshooter Member Posts: 1,057 Senior Member
    Being that I’m one of the guys with a manual lathe and mill and have screwed quite a few together, I KNOW what quality I’m achieving when I engage a feed or indicate a barrel, action, etc... I saw a video of a guy with a CNC getting ready to thread his barrel for a suppressor. He was indicating the barrel on the OD and only on the front of it. That should say enough.
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,746 Senior Member
    CNC guy.

    Why? Well, the builds are the same price. Both have impeccable reputations for building great rifles. I'm assuming that reputation is well deserved because they both check, double check and possibly triple check their work. So the only difference I can really see is delivery time. In the unlikely event that I might need a replacement part in the future, the CNC part won't need a whole lotta hand fitting afterwards -- again delivery time.
    I don't really care to have a unique rifle, just a very good one. But that's just me.
    I know, the CNC operator is some less skilled schmoe but as long as the final product is of high quality like the reputation suggests then why not. I'm helping to kill jobs and stuff :'( -- Sorry, but I want it Now!
    "I want the whole world..."
    :D
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 5,037 Senior Member
    Being that I’m one of the guys with a manual lathe and mill and have screwed quite a few together, I KNOW what quality I’m achieving when I engage a feed or indicate a barrel, action, etc...
    I had the same before I retired, had a lathe, mill, etc.did all my own work, keep your M-700 actions I'll take a pre 64 M-70 as first choice or a good small ring 98, add a Gentry 3 position safety, 24" Shilen # 2 s/s bbl, fine piece of crotch feather walnut,add some bells and whistles chambered for either .270 or 280AI, That would be one fine hunting rifle.

    JAY


    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,762 Senior Member


    A talented guy with a good CNC mill and lathe will hold to tighter tolerances with much less chance for error than a talented guy with purely manual stuff. And he'll get it done 20X faster.

    Just the facts, ma'am.

    Mike


    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,388 Senior Member
    The question I've got is this:  Can the level of CNC mill affordable at the cottage industry scale hold the tolerances of the good old school stuff, properly maintained?  Not terribly long ago, the answer was no.

    The computer stuff has the potential to be awesome, but I think just as much the initials can stand for "Cutting Numerous Corners"
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,435 Senior Member
    This was an interesting topic here and the same when my friend and I were discussing it.  He was like most of y'all and likes a traditional gunsmith.  Me I'll have my rifles built by someone who was a master machinist first and then graduated to CNC equipment.  Doesn't make me or my rifles better than anyone else, just gives me peace of mind knowing how and the level of detail that went into the build.

    The first time I ever saw a complete CNC shop for guns was at Stiller actions.  They were local to me in Garland TX.  I've spent many an evening watching the precision work of their CNC equipment.  Jerry has an incredible shop.  Speedy Gonzales hall of fame bench rest shooter and custom gunsmith tried using his equipment to measure the precision of Jerry's actions.  He couldn't do it with all of his best measuring equipment.  Once he saw the laser measurements he was blown away the level of detail and accuracy.  Still a fine and an outstanding gunsmith in his own, but very hard to achieve that level of accuracy Jerry gets out of his CNC equipment.

    While on business in KC a bunch I use to spend time at GA Precision with.  Again another CNC shop producing some of the finest tactical rifles you can have built.  George's shop was incredible.  Then I met Chad Dixon at Longrifles Inc.  The finest CNC machine shop for gun builds I've ever seen.  I have two of Chad's rifles and one being re-barreled as I type this.  Chad builds the US Olympic teams rifles.   The man is all about precision in every aspect of his work and building some of the most accurate rifles made.

    However, whether built by a great gunsmith or CNC shop, my buddy and I both feel there comes a point of diminishing returns.  Does absolute precision make the best and most accurate rifles.  We both didn't think so.  An action trued to .001/.0001 from a traditional gunsmith and one off a CNC machine at .0001/.00001 or better  threaded properly with a precision chamber and barrel.  Both will probably shoot better than most shooters capabilities.  

    Me, since it doesn't cost me any more or maybe a tad more than a top gunsmith, I like knowing everything was built to the exacting standards for the type of rifle I'm shooting.  Meaning a hunting rifle won't carry the same specs as a bench rest rifle that can't afford any dirt or debris getting in or on it. 

    This one comes down to personal preference and everyone wins!
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement