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Just came into possession of some neat rifles

bullsi1911bullsi1911 ModeratorPosts: 12,038 Senior Member
These technically belong to my brother, but I’m pretty sure I’m gonna buy the Marlin off of him.

My brother is a realtor.  One of his clients is selling her house, and decided to get rid of all her deceased husband’s stuff.  Thing is, he has been deceased for a while, and the guns that he bought were all kept in a Stack-On gun locker in the garage for a LONG time.  It does not look like they were well cared for BEFORE they were left in a hot and humid environment for 15 years- and time was NOT nice to them.  Only thing in good shape is a Remington 1100, and my brother is keeping that as a dove gun.

Things that landed in my possession are a trio of .22s.  

First is a Remington Model 34 in horrific shape with no inner magazine tube.  The bolt is stiff and ‘sludge-y’ to operate.  The metal is all brown and red, wood is in almost ‘relic’ condition.  The bore still has rifling, and a couple of heavy pits that I can see.  Damn shame that this gun made it from the 1930s to just probably be turned into a wall hanger.  HOWEVER- it all seems to work.  I may test it at the range, and buy a repro mag tube and make it a shooter.  We shall see.

Second is a Marlin model 81G.  No parts are missing, but the outer metal is rough and pitted.  Bolt is stiff and ‘muddy’ to operate.  This one I will probably take ownership of and try to restore.  The bore looks to be in really good shape compared to the rest of the gun.  Nothing rare or valuable about it, but you can never have enough .22s!

The last one is the only ‘rare’ or desirable one of the bunch.  A Winchester 255 lever action in .22 Mag.  From what I understand these were not made very long, and are pretty rare.  This one is not too far gone, but there are pits and rust.  

I’ll post pics in a little bit.
To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
-Mikhail Kalashnikov

Replies

  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,493 Senior Member
    Some 0000 steel wool and oil may refresh the metal. It's surprising what sometimes remains under the crud. 
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,928 Senior Member
    Guns chambered in 22wmr became avialable around 1959/60.. I may have some original magazine ads for that Winchester. I'll look tomorrow.👀
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,446 Senior Member
    No pics. 
    No guns. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,986 Senior Member
    Great catch! I see fun projects to complete. Will probably never make a dime on them but being .22s they're very versatile and useful.
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,907 Senior Member
    edited July 2019 #6
    I hope you can get the Model 34 running. Mine is probably my favorite rifle. Best I can tell mine was made in Oct. of 1935.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    I love bringing old neglected guns back to life.  When they are beyond saving as collector items is when I really get to have fun.  I file, sand, polish, blue, buy/make replacement parts to whatever extent to get a neglected gun back to pride of ownership status.  .22 barrels are easy to line and usually come back as exceptional shooters because of the brand new bore.  Can wait to see some before/after shots.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,038 Senior Member


    some quick and dirty before shots. Think I’m going to start on the Remington, since that one is the worst off of all of them
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,179 Senior Member
    Those are going to be fine once you are done with them, get the kids motivated to help with the sanding. Hope they are shooters.  
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,493 Senior Member
    I've seen worse!! They'll be worth the time!!
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,446 Senior Member
    Big Al1 said:
    I've seen worse!! They'll be worth the time!!
    What he said. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 12,130 Senior Member
    Like they said, some of my late fatherinlaws guns were like that, some worse.  I was amazed at how good they cleaned up.  Congrats
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,573 Senior Member
    I've got the .22 LR version of that 225.  I think it's a model 250.  I posted pictures of it on the forum some time ago.  Mine doesn't have checkering.  I bought it in 1964, the first rifle I bought on my own.  It stayed in the family with my BIL until he died a couple of years ago and I got the rifle back.  It's an accurate-enough rifle.  Lots of memories with that rifle.

    With modern, waxed .22 rimfire ammo, bores will almost always look great as the wax protects the bore from rust.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,986 Senior Member
    Those will pass as "sightly used" down here....very nice!
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    Oh wow those are not as bad as I imagined.  They’ll make a great comeback with a little elbow grease.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 2,355 Senior Member
    OMG those aren't bad! Kroil is your friend! I'd soak them down and let them set for a couple days. Some 0000 steel woo, tee shirts while they're still wet and you'll be surprised what you find. After that if collector value isn't your concern some Oxphoblue cream, heat gun and some wood refinishing  will work wonders.

    My nephew found two .22s in is basement after a tenant moved out. The first was a Remington 721 that wasn't in too bad shape. Ye second was a single shot Savage that was made in 1939 . from what I can tell it was "Bubba's" first rifle. Some where down the line Bubba decided to carve a dragon into the stock, it took me ten minutes to figure out it was a dragon. Bubba wasn't an artist. He must have abandoned it in a barn.The rear sight was missing it was badly rusted all over I started with 60 grit to clean the butt plate. Thanks to Kroil, 0000 steel wool, Oxphoblue, a Dremel tool an dogged determination my great niece will inherit "Rodney", Bubba's dragon gun. it's blonde with burned in features and will hold a ragged hole at 25 yards.

    Through the years I've refurbished a lot of 22s, many of them Marlin model 60's to give to my son's friends. They have become cherished pieces even though they hold no monetary or collector's value.

    After a friend's divorce and the passing of his father I refurbished a lot of his collection and restored the value to what he thought was now junk. 

    Thank you for salvaging history! Its a labor of love

      
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,953 Senior Member
    I also have a 34 and agree they are fabulous well worth the time to fix.
    The loading mechanism is incredible  on them.

  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 12,038 Senior Member
    I have been on a gun cleaning binge the last few weeks, and finally got to working on these guns.  The 34 was absolutely filthy, and actually had dead bugs fall out of the stock when I took it apart. 

    I got the bolts all freed up, bores swabbed out, and took the, to the lease with a few rounds of hoarded ammo.  This was just a function test- no accuracy, etc....

    bad news- the 34 takes four strikes to set off a round. Either there is more grunge in the bolt, or it needs a new spring. It also won’t feed from the mag.

    The Winchester is an absolute hoot to shoot. I have never wanted a .22Mag, but that one got me thinking it might be a worthwhile addition.  100% function, and seemed to be hitting pretty consistently on cans. 

    The marlin was another great performer.  100% function, and a 16 round bolt action just never seems to run empty. 

    I’ll start some actual restoration as soon as I get the rest of the guns clean. 
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    Pretty good new all around.  Steps in the right direction!
  • pjames777pjames777 Senior Member Posts: 1,421 Senior Member
    Have fun and it is fun bringing them back to life.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,986 Senior Member
    Fun projects! From the "before" pics, here those would be considered as "good condition"; aesthetically nothing some gun oil, 0000 steel wool, steam and boiled linseed oil won't solve.

    Remington parts are availabe in Ebay, Numrich or others. Hope the blt needs only more cleaning.
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 2,035 Senior Member
    Great project guns!
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • JunkCollectorJunkCollector Posts: 1,067 Senior Member
    Get that 34 working.
    They are tackdrivers and have a cool loading mechanism.

  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,320 Senior Member
    A full tear-down on the 34's bolt is probably essential.

    You have to remember that these guns come from a time when 3-in-1 oil and WD-40 were probably more common gun care products than the actual gun care products you SHOULD use for the job.  You probably have a teaspoon's worth of dried up lacquer retarding the movement of your parts.  You may need to get medieval with time in a pot of boiling water and hard bristle brushes to get it cleansed.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • JunkCollectorJunkCollector Posts: 1,067 Senior Member
    Throw the bolt in a 50/50 mix of acetone atf mix for a week cover shake agitate daily and gunk will melt away
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    Throw the bolt in a 50/50 mix of acetone atf mix for a week cover shake agitate daily and gunk will melt away
    This.  I have not used that particular mix but I've had to do that with many vintage .22 bolts over the years just to take them apart.  Weak old springs caked with dried up old oil and grit don't work all that well.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,573 Senior Member
    Kerosene does a good job...and it's cheap.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,642 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    Kerosene does a good job...and it's cheap.
    This is true.
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