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Bolting down a safe

JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior MemberPosts: 7,745 Senior Member

We recently moved, and I decided to buy a new safe.  The only place I have to put it is in my garage.  It's not what I really prefer, but it's better than nothing.  It has an electrical outlet, and I already have a golden rod dehumidifier in it, so I think I can keep my guns in good condition.  But, I digress.

I want to bolt it to the floor.  The safe came with lag bolts and plastic anchors, and I have a hammer drill and the requisite bit for drilling into the concrete floor.  However, one review I read stated that the reviewer had to use loc-tite to get the anchor bolts to take hold.  So, I also have some loc-tite (the non-permanent variety).

My question is should the loc-time be used to hold the plastic anchor in place, to hold the lag bolt in the anchor, or both?

Any other suggestions would also be appreciated.

Thanks,

Jerry

Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.

Replies

  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,127 Senior Member
    The Red Heads are good concrete anchors. I would question a plastic anchor in concrete.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,757 Senior Member
    Those wedge anchors are the same ones I used on my safe...but because my garage floor can get damp I used a stack of  large washers on each bolt to ensure there was an air space between the floor and the bottom of the safe
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,745 Senior Member
    Thanks.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • wddodgewddodge Senior Member Posts: 1,087 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Those wedge anchors are the same ones I used on my safe...but because my garage floor can get damp I used a stack of  large washers on each bolt to ensure there was an air space between the floor and the bottom of the safe
    Instead of a stack of washers, I used 1"x4" fake plastic deck lumber to hold my safes off the concrete. 

    Denny
    Participating in a gun buy back program because you think that criminals have too many guns is like having yourself castrated because you think your neighbors have too many kids.... Clint Eastwood
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,745 Senior Member

    The safe is on steel skids which puts it about 4 inches from the floor.  However, I think I would have to drill through the bottom of the skids to get to the concrete underneath.  The safe was shipped with the skids bolted to the bottom of it.  I'm thinking I need to remove the skids before bolting down the safe.

    Does that seem right?  The bolts that shipped with the safe are not long enough to go the extra 4 inches.  Even if I leave the skids in place, I have to remove the bolts holding the skids to the safe, as they use the same holes that I would use to bolt down the safe.

    FWIW, this area averages about 45% humidity during the summer months, but much lower during the rest of the year.  It seems pretty unlikely to me that water will be a problem.

    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,757 Senior Member
    Those skids are there to facilitate moving the safe around with a forklift...so yeah... probably ought to take them off...

    Still prefer to have a bit of air space under the safe....even in Kansas, where it was dryer than a popcorn fart...still ended up with some water on the floor once in awhile...and the last thing I want is the floor of my safe rusting out...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,288 Senior Member
    I used 1 inch thick Starboard to lift my shop safe off the concrete floor. I used a 1 foot square piece cut into 4 equal 6x6 pieces. The stuff is high density plastic and is really tough stuff used in marine applications. You can get it off Amazon from several sellers, and it comes in colors if that matters. My shop safe has been on the stuff for 20 years + and it hasn't deteriorated any that I can tell. Just another possible solution.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,120 Senior Member
    I used the Red Head anchors with no need for Loc-Tite at all.  Just follow the directions and they should take just fine.

    Definitely partition the safe from the concrete floor with something - thin wood shims or an impermeable surface - or it will rust out badly on the bottom.  
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • rberglofrberglof Senior Member Posts: 2,634 Senior Member
    One of my safes has the skids that are welded on and I forgot to put spacers under the other one, guess I better get that done.
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,745 Senior Member

    I got the skids off last night.  Definitely not a 1 man job, even though I somehow managed to get it done by myself.  The problem was that I already had it in place, with the back of the safe next to the garage wall, and had to move it to get to the back bolts.  That was a chore.

    I never realized that putting a safe in a garage was such a chore.

    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • BigDanSBigDanS Senior Member Posts: 6,973 Senior Member
    Six-Gun said:
    I used the Red Head anchors with no need for Loc-Tite at all.  Just follow the directions and they should take just fine.

    Definitely partition the safe from the concrete floor with something - thin wood shims or an impermeable surface - or it will rust out badly on the bottom.  
    Agree on the red head anchors and no need for loctite, but I have a different opinion about lifting it from the floor and leaving any air gap.  Rust needs oxygen.  If the safe weighs 700 lbs loaded and you have it on a softish non permeable pad that is water proof like star board, make the entire surface sealed so no air or water can get to it and it will not rust out.

    D
    "A patriot is mocked, scorned and hated; yet when his cause succeeds, all men will join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." Mark Twain
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.... now who's bringing the hot wings? :jester:
  • Six-GunSix-Gun Senior Member Posts: 8,120 Senior Member
    BigDanS said:
    Six-Gun said:
    I used the Red Head anchors with no need for Loc-Tite at all.  Just follow the directions and they should take just fine.

    Definitely partition the safe from the concrete floor with something - thin wood shims or an impermeable surface - or it will rust out badly on the bottom.  
    Agree on the red head anchors and no need for loctite, but I have a different opinion about lifting it from the floor and leaving any air gap.  Rust needs oxygen.  If the safe weighs 700 lbs loaded and you have it on a softish non permeable pad that is water proof like star board, make the entire surface sealed so no air or water can get to it and it will not rust out.

    D
    That works, too, but the general theme that concrete absorbs and distributes water is still the same.  Keep the safe off of the bare concrete however you want and you should be good to go.  
    Accuracy: because white space between bullet holes drives me insane.
  • jbohiojbohio Senior Member Posts: 5,569 Senior Member
    I'm going to disagree with everyone.  
    Jerry, you should use drop in anchors.  They are permanent in the floor.  However, if you decide to move the safe, you remove the bolts, and slide the safe away.  With wedge anchors, you will have to LIFT the safe off the anchors.
  • snake284snake284 Senior Member Posts: 22,387 Senior Member
    edited August 2019 #16
    Mine are in the house so I'm not worried too much about rust. One is sitting on wood flooring and the other is on linoleum. Both bolted to the concrete with anchor bolts. Actually,  I had some good help. My buddy Pat, the guy that used to hunt deer with a .375 H&H, was in maintenance at the plant we worked at and he engineered it. He over engineers every thing so it will be there for a thousand years. If 3/8" bolts will work, 3/4" will work better. So there you have it. I'm certain that when the mountains tumble to the sea my safe's will still be there.
    Daddy, what's an enabler?
    Son that's somebody with nothing to do with his time but keep me in trouble with mom.
  • breamfisherbreamfisher Senior Member Posts: 13,490 Senior Member
    jbohio said:
    I'm going to disagree with everyone.  
    Jerry, you should use drop in anchors.  They are permanent in the floor.  However, if you decide to move the safe, you remove the bolts, and slide the safe away.  With wedge anchors, you will have to LIFT the safe off the anchors.
    I used the anchors in my old house, then moved the safe to my new house and used new anchors. To remove the safe I used a mini sledge and punch to knock the old anchors into the slab. Then I slid the safe around. 

    Obviously I drilled the holes too deep. And I made sure the slab locations had no water or electrical in those areas. 

    But JBOhio has a really good point. 
    Overkill is underrated.
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