Home Main Category Personal Defense

body armour for an EMT

KMT2KMT2 MemberPosts: 373 Member
Looks like my region of the state has issued us body armour. I'm concerned about it, but also glad they are thinking of us, when we get in a mass issue.
 Im now thinking of a class two (I Believe that is it) for under my uniform shirt.
 would like some options.
 My mother is willing to purchase, and I have told her what the darn things cost.

If you think OHSA is a little town in Wisconsin you may be in trouble!
Peace is firing my guns or 60 feet below the surface of the water.

Replies

  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,375 Senior Member
    My friend that just retired from firefighting/EMT/paramedic/SWAT medic career was primarily concerned about getting punctured, he dressed with plates when he was on scene with SWAT, YMMV
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,162 Senior Member
    You are far more likely to get cut/stabbed in the EMS/Fire business...so cut/stab resistance should figure into it as well..

    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Old RonOld Ron Senior Member Posts: 4,402 Senior Member
    Any time I have been given armor ...... I get combat pay to go along with it .
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,746 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    You are far more likely to get cut/stabbed in the EMS/Fire business...so cut/stab resistance should figure into it as well..

    I agree. Make sure whatever vest you decide on, it comes with a KR (Knife Resistance) value of 1 or 2.

    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • KMT2KMT2 Member Posts: 373 Member
    Yeah I figured cut and stab, was the key thing. if I need the plate which they are giving me it is a very oh . moment. 
    If you think OHSA is a little town in Wisconsin you may be in trouble!
    Peace is firing my guns or 60 feet below the surface of the water.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,467 Senior Member
    Anything you do with armor is going to be a balance of what it can stop versus how much it impedes your movement.  Think about how much movement you need to do the EMT job - stooping, bending, lifting, pounding out CPR, crawling around in ambulances.  Then think about what is actually likely to get thrown at it.  Given that the average urban handgun is well within the limits of the major vest manufacturers, and you're PRRROBABLY getting the call after most bullet-related threats have been dealt with, armoring up like a Ninja Turtle for rifle rounds probably doesn't help you.

    Look into what the carrier shells are made of.  You're going to be getting other people's blood on you, so the ability to clean and decontaminate the cooties is probably more critical for you than for a cop.  Give some thought as to whether the carrier design does anything to increase airflow - dropping dead from heat exhaustion while trying to resuscitate someone doesn't help anybody.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • SpkSpk Senior Member Posts: 4,746 Senior Member
    KMT2 said:
    Yeah I figured cut and stab, was the key thing. if I need the plate which they are giving me it is a very oh . moment. 
    I think you'd be good with an under-the-shirt level IIa vest with a listed KR value.
    You can always keep a Level III with plate carrier and plate on standby for special occasions. Maybe I'm being short sighted but unless you're going in right behind the officers I don't think you'll need that kind of protection. (Not saying it can't happen, it just seems unlikely -- maybe, I'm wrong)
    I don't know what the protocols are these days but from what I've seen recently, LE secures the scene and then EMS moves in. Officers today often have there own LE medic. I'm guessing you're not a LE medic/EMT. If you are then that changes things.

    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience -- Mark Twain
    How easy it is to make people believe a lie, and [how] hard it is to undo that work again! -- Mark Twain

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,162 Senior Member
    I concur that the plate may be overkill unless you are involved in Tactical EMS with a SWAT team..
    However, I have walked into plenty of "routine" calls with no police back-up that went sideways due to a bat crap crazy patient or family member. 

    Street Survival 101 says that any time you're dealing with the public at the worst moment in their lives, stuff can happen and you better be prepared to deal with it
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,642 Senior Member
    I was an EMT for a year and have been in some dicey situations, all of which were threatening rather than guns/knives. Before suiting up, I'd study the stats on the number of EMTs wounded in your area.  I don't know, but I think it would be pretty small.  If the number was low, I wouldn't wear it...heavy, makes you sweat, and uncomfortable.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 18,162 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    I was an EMT for a year and have been in some dicey situations, all of which were threatening rather than guns/knives. Before suiting up, I'd study the stats on the number of EMTs wounded in your area.  I don't know, but I think it would be pretty small.  If the number was low, I wouldn't wear it...heavy, makes you sweat, and uncomfortable.
    It's no longer an option in many locales Gene...if the company buys
    / requires it, you wear it...and if you work in the knife and gun club...(one of several in MI).where the OP does..It's a damn good idea...

    ..The odds of a cop getting shot in the line of duty are pretty small in the grand scheme of things, but body armor is a pretty standard thing nowaday...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,642 Senior Member
    edited December 2019 #12
    Yeah, rate of getting shot as a cop isn't common.  In one of the projects in Athens, the P'O. suspended mail delivery there.  An EMT getting shot on the scene is also rare, or the media aren't reporting it.

    Vests are good, better now than they used to be. Vests also protect the chest in car crashes.  When I was in LE, the US government paid half the price of the vests, if the agency filed a letter of application.  Thamks, GWB. I don't know if that policy still exists...I hope it does.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • KMT2KMT2 Member Posts: 373 Member
    thanks guys, Im still looking at them, but with a KR rating . I sure as heck do not want plates on if i dont have to.

    If you think OHSA is a little town in Wisconsin you may be in trouble!
    Peace is firing my guns or 60 feet below the surface of the water.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement