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CORDLESS TOOL BATTERYS

jaywaptijaywapti Senior MemberPosts: 4,981 Senior Member
Need some 18V Dewalt batteries, its almost as cheap just to buy new tools with batterys
I looked on line and found Vanon replacements for about 1/3 Dewalts price, anyone have any experience with these ???

JAY
THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT

Replies

  • AccipiterAccipiter New Member Posts: 887 Senior Member
    Not specifically the vanon, but I worked for a guy years ago that would send his away to be rebuilt by a 3rd party.  He swore they were superior in every way.  More power, more reserve, and longer battery life.  

    I switched from dewalt tools about 8 or 9 years ago because of the batteries.  They truly sucked, and cost a fortune to replace.  
    Apparently free thought is punished, and conformity is required, while peckerless cowards run the show.

    ECHO...ECHO....echo...

    Ah......One savors the hypocrisy!

    Karma.........It’s a bitch.
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,981 Senior Member
    Accipiter said:

    I switched from dewalt tools about 8 or 9 years ago because of the batteries.  They truly sucked, and cost a fortune to replace.  
    What kind did you change to ?? I checked the price for all the tools that H.D. and Lowes carry and there all about the same as Dewalt.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,320 Senior Member
    You might, if you haven't already, check out Makita.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,981 Senior Member
    You might, if you haven't already, check out Makita.

    Mike
    Yeah Mike about the same.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,132 Senior Member
    I went with Porter Cable cordless tools because they were one of the few at the time that were selling tools ala carte and had NiCad batteries that I could rebuild.

    Anyway, I have bought cheap aftermarket batteries for Black and Decker, Porter Cable, and Ryobi cordless tools. The batteries work just as good as the originals. If I were you, I would go ahead and buy the aftermarket batteries for your DeWalt-- there isn't much to any of them-- they are typically a bunch of cells soldiered together inside the case and the only difference between brands is the way they hook on to the tool.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,132 Senior Member
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • jaywaptijaywapti Senior Member Posts: 4,981 Senior Member
    Thanks Jerm, I'm gonna get 2 from amazon and give them a try.

    JAY
    THE DEFINITION OF GUN CONTROL IS HITTING THE TARGET WITH YOUR FIRST SHOT
  • AccipiterAccipiter New Member Posts: 887 Senior Member
    I buy ryobi.  They have 90%+ the usability of the so called premium brands at half the cost.  I started buying into ryobi the same time I got out of dewalt.  I use my tools regularly, as I own a home repair business.  I have had to replace a jig saw and a circular saw in all that time.  Both replaced individually without batteries for $59 each.  I am still well below the cost of running dewalt tools, or any of the other premium brand.  I am down only 5 lithium batteries in all that time.  My dewalt batteries would seldom last a year.  I have 10 to 12 batteries right now.  I buy them after Christmas when the prices drop.  Just got 2 18 volt, 6ah batteries for $79.  


    Hope that helps
    Apparently free thought is punished, and conformity is required, while peckerless cowards run the show.

    ECHO...ECHO....echo...

    Ah......One savors the hypocrisy!

    Karma.........It’s a bitch.
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,132 Senior Member
    edited February 2020 #10
    When I bought a set for my son, I bought him Ryobi. Part of the reason was that his mother has Black and Decker, I have Porter Cable, and a couple of guys that we work with have DeWalt and Milwaukee so his wouldn't get mixed up with the others. The other reason is that they sell the tools ala cart and there is a very good variety. He has the circular saw, sawzall, drill, impact driver, air pump, vacuum, miter saw, brad nailer, finish nailer, and orbital tool. The only one that has given him problems so far is the miter saw, but we tore that apart and found it was a bad $10 switch and replaced it.

    We have been getting pretty good at fixing our equipment-- Between the nasty restaurant equipment and tools I pick up at auction for pennies on the dollar, we have learned that pretty much most everything can be rebuilt. I can chase down obscure parts pretty good now.

    Cordless batteries? It is typically a bad cell. You can take apart the battery, test the cells, then replace the bad ones, but those aftermarket batteries are so cheap, it is hardly worth the bother.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,736 Senior Member
    When I bought a set for my son, I bought him Ryobi. Part of the reason was that his mother has Black and Decker, I have Porter Cable, and a couple of guys that we work with have DeWalt and Milwaukee so his wouldn't get mixed up with the others. The other reason is that they sell the tools ala cart and there is a very good variety. He has the circular saw, sawzall, drill, impact driver, air pump, vacuum, miter saw, brad nailer, finish nailer, and orbital tool. The only one that has given him problems so far is the miter saw, but we tore that apart and found it was a bad $10 switch and replaced it.

    We have been getting pretty good at fixing our equipment-- Between the nasty restaurant equipment and tools I pick up at auction for pennies on the dollar, we have learned that pretty much most everything can be rebuilt. I can chase down obscure parts pretty good now.

    Cordless batteries? It is typically a bad cell. You can take apart the battery, test the cells, then replace the bad ones, but those aftermarket batteries are so cheap, it is hardly worth the bother.
    Yep.  You can find replacement parts for just about anything on eBay directly from China, and instructions on how to fix it on YouTube.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,132 Senior Member
    The trick is finding the actual part number and not the one that the assembler assigns it. For example, using Oliver's part number for a belt on an Oliver bread slicer is about $50. A #xyz V belt is $6 at the auto parts store and is the same damn thing!
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,438 Senior Member
    edited February 2020 #13
    i bought  a new Makita.  but i originally had the 9.6 V version, so it was time to upgrade.  I got the 16 V verison

    but i was looking at this place.  Its local for me and was going to send a few of the 9.6 V packs to see how they do.

    http://www.batterypackrebuilders.com/

    I still have the drill/packs/charger and case for the 9.6 V so i may just have a couple rebuilt and give them a go.  The drill lives in the garage so its not a big deal if its works or not.

    fwiw, on a previous job we were located a few store fronts from a dealt service center.  My boss had bought all of the shops tools from them.

    in any case, he just walked overthere and they gave him new batteries.

    not sure if i could do that, but it was good of them.


    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,132 Senior Member
    edited February 2020 #14
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • PFDPFD Senior Member Posts: 1,455 Senior Member
    edited February 2020 #15
    Recently I found all 3 of my NiCad batteries for my B&D 18 volt drill, flashlight, circular saw kit wouldn't hold a charge.

    I had these tools for about 10 years and already bought a few replacement NiCads.

    I know NiCad sucks compared to LiOn in all ways so I found these adapters.

    Yeah, I had to buy an adapter and 2 new batteries and a charger but now I have batteries that will last more than a couple of years and my tools run a LOT stronger and longer on the 20 volt LiOns.

    Check out these adapters:




    That's all I got.

    Paul
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 24,110 Senior Member
    Do they make an adapter that has a cord coming out the bottom end?
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • N454casullN454casull Member Posts: 622 Senior Member
    zorba said:
    Do they make an adapter that has a cord coming out the bottom end?
    And there it is. Took longer than I thought it would, but there it is none the less. 
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 24,110 Senior Member
    Serious question. I'd think there'd be a market for such a thing. Use the cord when convenient, use the batteries when necessary. Best of both worlds!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,132 Senior Member
    edited February 2020 #19
    I don't see why the concept wouldn't work. But the fact is that I can typically work a whole day with only 2 charged batteries. If you are doing any serious drill work, you should be using a drill press anyway, not a hand held. All the big torquing drills for stuff like mixing drywall mud and thinset are already plug ins. The real niche for cordless tools is light duty work that can do 75% of the jobs while saving the time to haul around, unload, and set up corded tools.And time=money. A couple of minutes here and there add up over the course of a day. 

    We do a lot of work on sidewalks. To cut a form board, we would need to fire up a generator, unroll a cord, get out the saw, cut the board, then roll it all back up again. Cordless tools? Grab the saw and make the cut. There is another battery charging in the truck off the cigarette lighter when needed. Framing a house? Time to get out the miter saw and a couple of plug in saws.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • JayJay Senior Member Posts: 3,938 Senior Member
    PFD said:
    Recently I found all 3 of my NiCad batteries for my B&D 18 volt drill, flashlight, circular saw kit wouldn't hold a charge.

    I had these tools for about 10 years and already bought a few replacement NiCads.

    I know NiCad sucks compared to LiOn in all ways so I found these adapters.

    Yeah, I had to buy an adapter and 2 new batteries and a charger but now I have batteries that will last more than a couple of years and my tools run a LOT stronger and longer on the 20 volt LiOns.

    Check out these adapters:





    I've looked at going this route, but never did it.  When I was looking at them, it seemed most places I looked had a larger than normal amount of negative reviews, so I just didn't jump on it. Being pretty well invested in DeWalt 18v tools, I've been putting off switching to newer lithium tools and having to start all over.  So I've just kept going with the 18v stuff.  I usually wait for a good deal on the 18V drill with 2 batteries and charger.  Usually under $100. So I now have multiple drills and batteries.  Which kinda comes in handy sometimes.  I can have a drill set up with a drill bit for pre drilling and one set up with a driver to drive screws or lag bolts. 

    I also have the 3/8 inch impact gun that is kinda handy for light duty tire work around the farm where dragging an air compressor around is a pain and I don't have to do it manually.

  • JermanatorJermanator Senior Member Posts: 16,132 Senior Member
    I went with Porter Cable cordless tools because they were one of the few at the time that were selling tools ala carte and had NiCad batteries that I could rebuild.

    Anyway, I have bought cheap aftermarket batteries for Black and Decker, Porter Cable, and Ryobi cordless tools. The batteries work just as good as the originals. If I were you, I would go ahead and buy the aftermarket batteries for your DeWalt-- there isn't much to any of them-- they are typically a bunch of cells soldiered together inside the case and the only difference between brands is the way they hook on to the tool.
    Ok. Update... one of my son's aftermarket Ryobi batteries that were purchased last October croaked at work today. 2 minutes in chat with Amazon customer service and they have a new one coming tomorrow. They don't need me to send back the old one either so I will probably pick up a couple lithium cells and fix the other one while I am at it.
    Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it.
    -Thomas Paine
  • coolgunguycoolgunguy Senior Member Posts: 6,624 Senior Member
    I have Porter Cable at home, but Milwaukee at work.  The previous maintenance manager started with Milwaukee, so for common battery & chargers sake, I kept with that brand.  Since I'm spending my own money at home, I went with Porter.  ZERO complaints with either brand. 
    "Bipartisan" usually means that a bigger than normal deception is happening.
    George Carlin
  • KMT2KMT2 Member Posts: 367 Member
    cool. Thanks Jerm. If ( and i know it will be sooner than later) my battery packs die I have you to help me find parts and such.

    If you think OHSA is a little town in Wisconsin you may be in trouble!
    Peace is firing my guns or 60 feet below the surface of the water.
  • bisleybisley Senior Member Posts: 10,798 Senior Member
    My Dewalt 18v drill is 20 years old and I have spent several times more on batteries than I paid for it. This time, I decided to retire it and try the new 'brushless' Milwaukee, when I found a decent price on a drill and a 1/4" impact driver. I have hardly used the drill, but I love the driver. Time will tell on the batteries, but so far, so good. When I get everything else done, I will probably try the battery rebuild on the Dewalt, just for fun.
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,819 Senior Member
    edited February 2020 #25
    I would buy the rebuild kit or the aftermarket batteries.

    I chose to buy Ridgid because of the reviews, the 3 year warranty and the lifetime service agreement. Batteries are covered and you get free parts and service.
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