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For Louis L'amour fans

earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,749 Senior Member
I'm an avid consumer of his fiction. His stories are the only place I've ever incountered reference to this gun.

I didn't even know they were real until just now. Not a practical design. But the intricate machining is spectacular.

Replies

  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,683 Senior Member
    Wow. That's the darndest thing I ever saw...
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • AccipiterAccipiter New Member Posts: 885 Senior Member
    Cool concept.  “Last of the Breed” is the only Louis L’amour book I have read.  It takes place in the 70s or 80s in Russia so no mention of that revolver.
    Apparently free thought is punished, and conformity is required, while peckerless cowards run the show.

    ECHO...ECHO....echo...

    Ah......One savors the hypocrisy!

    Karma.........It’s a bitch.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,749 Senior Member
    Mistakes can kill you. Is one that references one. There's at least one more. Rare guns. Video said only 200 made. Probly for obvious reasons.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,683 Senior Member
    I'd be more than a mite worried about an unintended KABOOM.
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,744 Senior Member
    Accipiter said:
    Cool concept.  “Last of the Breed” is the only Louis L’amour book I have read.  It takes place in the 70s or 80s in Russia so no mention of that revolver.
    Read that book.  If you've read one L'amour book, you've read them all.  I'm not a Western fan, which this one isn't, technically, but it reads the same.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,838 Senior Member
     Very cool gun!  I love all good westerns and Louis L’amour is always a favorite 
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,744 Senior Member
    Since this thread has gone to LouisL'amour, I'll talk about my experience, since the revolver is unobtainable, while LL books can be found in any bookstore.  

    A good friend of mine 30 years ago read a lot of Louis L'amour and gave me books after he'd read them.  He was then about my age now.  I read a number of the books because I felt obliged to since he wanted to talk about them.  After a few books, I realized L'amour was writing to a formula.  He was a good formula writer, but told the same story with every book I read.  Which is what formula books do, and a helluva lot of modern movies. Since I'm not a Western fan, I looked at reading them as a chore that took up my reading time for books I wanted to read more.  He did research for his books, I believe. Those books were the only Westerns I've read.  I can see them as interesting if you're interested in that genre.  My reading interest when I was young was WW2 books and I read every one I could get my hands on.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • ojrojr Senior Member Posts: 1,092 Senior Member
    edited February 22 #9
    Loved L"amour in the day, the Sackets, Kilkennys,Chantry  and stand alones etc etc,
     Left the Dusty Fog, Mark Counter characters of JT Edson in the dust . Though I will admit to an imagined affinity with the Ysabel Kid for some unfathomable reason. 
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,749 Senior Member
    They were mostly pass time books for me. I read them because I was obligated for certain things that required periods of waiting. Or to keep my mind distracted from reality of an unpleasant nature. I mostly read for the same reasons today. Only other subjects and content have captured my interest.

    Some western writers have created much more complexed and enveloping stories. None that I'm aware of have been as prolific. His stories are the only ones I can remember or am aware of that mention this particular gun. I'd venture a guess that he saw an example in a museum or private collection and it left an impression.
  • RugerFanRugerFan Senior Member Posts: 2,314 Senior Member
    ojr said:
    Loved L"amour in the day, the Sackets, Kilkennys,Chantry  and stand alones etc etc,
     Left the Dusty Fog, Mark Counter characters of JT Edson in the dust . Though I will admit to an imagined affinity with the Ysabel Kid for some unfathomable reason. 
    The Chick Bowdrie short stories were my favorites. 

    I have almost every book he wrote. Haven't read one in years
  • GilaGila Posts: 1,828 Senior Member
    His adventure stories are great, and they aren't westerns.
    No good deed goes unpunished...
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,267 Senior Member
    12 shot .380  - more or less - in the 1860's?  That's an interesting notion.

    I think it's the Cody museum that has a rifle or musket that uses that multi-load concept.  It had a moveable flintlock that you'd slide backwards from flash hole to flash hole.  I don't recall if there were multiple flash pans, or if on-the-fly priming was part of the process you were still stuck with.

    The thought of dealing with the gunk of black powder in a complex system like that gives me the shivers, but I guess it's a "practical" gun in that for it to be a problem for you, you must first be ALIVE at the end of the day.  Back then, capacity wasn't about delaying a magazine change; it was about staving off the knife fight, so in that context, I can see the appeal.

    Still, I think that's going to be something of a gun that belongs to the rare nerdy guy that actually reads the owner's manual.  Anybody else, it's gonna quit running in short order.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,759 Senior Member
    That is just a cool piece. I can understand why only 200 were made and wonder how many went to pieces. Imagine the poor soul who found one on the battle field not being familiar with hand guns let alone this contraption.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,749 Senior Member
    I have a notion right are wrong that people of the time were quite familiar with how to load the guns properly.

    Its my understanding that a tallow wad between the powder and ball was common pocedure. Old photographs of Kansas Missouri border fighters show loaded chambers without grease. I'm thinking that the chance of the first charge lighting off the back charge was small.  I see a bigger problem with that front charge failing to ignite.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,267 Senior Member
    Tallow wads?  Brother, we just marched up here from Louisiana BAREFOOT!  We smeared all the tallow we had on our hardtack biscuits months ago to give them some flavor!  :D  

    I'm 99.9% sure that the wad of Crisco (or whatever) smeared on the front of the cylinder to prevent chain-firing is purely a modern technique used by guys whose plan is to drive to the range on Saturday, play around without blowing themselves up, and drive home to clean guns and have dinner.  In the field, it's gonna be a horrible mess of lint, sand, and goo, and when you're 200 yards away from 10,000 guys whose sole purpose for being there is to blow you up, a chain-firing revolver is VERY far down on your list of things to be concerned about.

    As for how it applies to the gun of the OP; what often separates the good ones from the bad ones is how fussy they are.  Spacing out the loads correctly when you might have to substitute coarser rifle or cannon powder that compresses differently; when you have to improvise wadding from. . . whatever; when your special powder measure got lost in a hectic night river crossing; when your new batch of percussion caps works in everyone else's Colts and Remingtons, but won't throw a spark all the way to the front charge; when you say "NUTS!" to loading the front of the chamber and choose to only run six shots in the back, but still have to work around the hardware for firing the front shot you're not loading.

    A really cool example of human ingenuity that's totally incompatible with the end-user environment.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,749 Senior Member
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