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Could you identify this rifle?

MingusMingusMingusMingusMingusMingus Posts: 3 New Member
Hello, I'm new here and with knowledge of guns. Although I grew up around guns with relatives and kin using and enjoying them, it is only now that I am taking greater interest on them and its history. I'm a Jazz fan and there is a video of my favorite musician shooting a rifle. His  name is Charles Mingus. And I'd like if someone could identify me the rifle used in the video, also, how many cartridges it carries, or any similar rifle could carry? Thank you for your time!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqb_QUsnKbg

Replies

  • MingusMingusMingusMingusMingusMingus Posts: 3 New Member
    Sorry, one more thing: what is that hole underneath the gun in which he mistook for the loading place?
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,928 Senior Member
    edited March 2019 #3
    It appears to be a bolt action shotgun of the Mossberg persuasion. And that "hole" is the " loading place"...the guy doesn't have the slightest idea what he's doing.
    As best as I recall it carried 3 rounds....maybe 5
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • MingusMingusMingusMingusMingusMingus Posts: 3 New Member
    Yeah, thank you first of all. I certainly am not down with the terms, or official terms, if there are such. But, anyhow, I got confused: you say that the loading place is in the hole under it, however he did load the shotgun in the barrel didn't he? I don't quite get it.   
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,051 Senior Member
    Mossberg shotgun, probably 20 gauge. The loading "hole" in the bottom is where the magazine (holding 3 rounds) is inserted. If you load directly into the chamber (from the top, as he did), the gun has a max capacity of 4 rounds.

    While he was a great jazz player, it's painfully obvious he needed to stay away from firearms pending some training. Honestly, this was a painful video to watch. While the audio was not high quality, I think I heard him say "anybody can do it". Well, yes, that's true, anybody can pull a trigger,  but some people need a whole lot of training. He being one of them.

    By your own admission, you know little about firearms. No problem with that. We are here to educate, and do it very well. You can learn a wealth of firearm info here. But safety will always be of paramount importance, and the video you linked is the complete antithesis of this.

    Mike

    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,744 Senior Member
    Yeah, thank you first of all. I certainly am not down with the terms, or official terms, if there are such. But, anyhow, I got confused: you say that the loading place is in the hole under it, however he did load the shotgun in the barrel didn't he? I don't quite get it.   
    He first tried to load it through the loading place, but then abandoned that for some reason and loaded it through the chamber.  He then discharged in apparently in a house.  To load it, you put three shells into the loading port, pushing them forward, one after the other.  He apparently did not know this.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,051 Senior Member
    Gene,

    Hate to disagree, but I've never seen a bolt action shotgun that fed from a tubular magazine. All I've ever encountered were fed from a bottom feeding magazine, just like a bolt action rifle.

    Of course, I haven't seen everything, but with a few exceptions, I keep hoping.  ;)

    Mike 
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,928 Senior Member
    edited March 2019 #8
    I believe that particular bolt action shotgun had a short magazine tube concealed in the forearm....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,051 Senior Member
    Learn something new every day. Never saw a tube fed bolt shotgun before. Didn't know such even existed. Thanks for that info.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,675 Senior Member
    I learned today too. I didn't even have a clue there was such a thing as a bolt action shotgun of ANY type!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,051 Senior Member
    My ex stepbrother had a Mossberg bolt action mag fed 20 gauge. It patterned extremely well regardless of shot size, but if you needed more than one shot, the issue was always doubtful.
    It was a jam-o-matic from the word go.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,749 Senior Member
    I used a Remington 12ga bolt action shotgun extensively when I was a kid. I also had and shot a Montgomery Wards 20ga bolt action shotgun some years ago. They both functioned reliably, were utilitarian in nature, inexpensive to purchase, and required little in the way of maintenance. They were also easy to operate.

    Kind of like a hundred dollar Briggs & Stratton mower. Add oil if low, fuel, pull cord to start, dispose/replace after failure.
  • WeatherbyWeatherby Senior Member Posts: 4,953 Senior Member
    Learn something new every day. Never saw a tube fed bolt shotgun before. Didn't know such even existed. Thanks for that info.

    Mike
    One of my favorite bunny busters Mike.
    JC Higgins 20 gauge it has taken lots of game.


  • ArmoredmanArmoredman Member Posts: 362 Member
    Mossberg Goose Gun was a bolt action shotgun. Never saw much need for one.
  • TheSycamoreKidTheSycamoreKid Posts: 1 New Member
    edited September 2019 #15
    Howdy:  I'm new to this thread, and am enjoying your comments.  I agree w/Jayhawker's first comment about this "rifle" being "of the Mossberg persuasion."  It appears to me to be a Mossberg 85/185 series steel magazine loaded shotgun.  I have one, and it is a fine operating machine.  Depending on the specific model, they will load either two or three rounds/shells in the magazine.  Also, I have several " under-barrel tube magazine fed, bolt action .410 shotguns produced in the 1930s-1950s time frame.  Then again, it could be a Stevens model 258, or one similar (that black painted stock nose, which was dipped into a bucket of paint, leads me to think it could be a Stevens).  It is definitely missing the steel floor plate and magazine latch/clip holder from the bottom side of the stock.  None of these are easy to find, but look in enough pawn shops and they can be found.  Thanks for letting me add my "two-cents."
  • Beinglis23Beinglis23 Posts: 2 New Member
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