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What is the fat percentage of wild Texas whitetail venison doe?

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  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    edited June 2020 #32
    tennmike said:
    I will have to contact broken arrow.



    How does one add beef tallow at home to ground venison? Does one melt the fat, measure it with a spoon then mix it into the meat by hand? 
    You mix the beef fat in when you grind the meat. Do you have a meat grinder?
    You weigh the lean meat and cut it down into chunks or strips. Weigh enough fat to add to your taste/specifications to the meat. Mix them together and grind it up. May have to run through grinder twice to get a good mix.
    Melting beef or hog fat and pouring that mess on raw meat will make one filthy mess.

    No, I have no meat grinder. I don't care to spend money on one either. I want to conduct the simplest venison taste test possible without dumping any more money into than absolutely necessary. I don't have space to store a grinder anyway. I guess one could just brown the ground venison in a skillet with some added tallow to approximate at 7% grade meat. A butcher one told me "grade" means fat percentage in regard to beef.  Then I could try this ground browned venison into various recipes substituting for ground beef as in pasta sauce, pizza topping, tacos, burritos or stroganoff. 

    Another question: can all the meat yielded from a deer carcass be ground by the processor upon request or will they only grind certain parts? If I decide I like ground venison from my taste experiment and decide to then hunt deer, I might then make it a point to grind all my meat and enrichen it with tallow. 

    Can ground venison be used in meat pies? I suppose so. I love good homemade beef or lamb pies anyway. 
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,085 Senior Member
    edited June 2020 #33
    Yes...the entire deer can be ground...done it many times...except for the backstraps...if you grind those up you go straight to hell..

    You can use venison in any recipe that calls for ground meat.

    Normally...I remove all the fat, silver skin and connective tissue from my venison then cube it up and package and freeze it as stew meat. If I have need of ground meat I run it through the grinder as needed...

    And what is your obsession with ground meat? Steaks?
    Roasts? Something wrong with those?

    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,570 Senior Member
    I would encourage you to use your education to do some simple searching on your own.
    In this area, you seem to be quite clueless.  Or you just like head games....
    You seem to enjoy the drama.
    Don't insult the very people you are asking questions about things you do not know.
    I would encourage you to do a lot of reading on past subjects in this forum.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,505 Senior Member
    You.......

    Should be you.......

    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    I would encourage you to use your education to do some simple searching on your own.
    In this area, you seem to be quite clueless.  Or you just like head games....
    You seem to enjoy the drama.
    Don't insult the very people you are asking questions about things you do not know.
    I would encourage you to do a lot of reading on past subjects in this forum.
    I dare say I haven't insulted a single person here. It's not like I've called another member here a dirty, rotten son-of-a-gun. I'm very seriously considering adding venison to my diet. This is not a game or a joke. Yes, I do enjoy a good chat with folks. Drama like a dozen cop cars in the neighborhood, I can do without, but I must confess being shut in on this COVID-19 thing is quite boring and I need to do something to keep my hands busy.  I joined this forum to explore and test the waters. If the water is too hot or too cold it wouldn't be prudent to dive into head first. I'm very gunshy about the whole notion of getting into wild game unless I do a lot of homework first. I won't speak any more here about wild venison until I buy some and try some and then report back what I think. I'm a very cautious person and maybe that's why I might come across sounding weird here. I've been screwed on several business dealings over my lifetime and that's why I have gotten cautious with age. 

    I would also like to try some dove breast if I can buy some of those too. 
  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Yes...the entire deer can be ground...done it many times...except for the backstraps...if you grind those up you go straight to hell..

    You can use venison in any recipe that calls for ground meat.

    Normally...I remove all the fat, silver skin and connective tissue from my venison then cube it up and package and freeze it as stew meat. If I have need of ground meat I run it through the grinder as needed...

    And what is your obsession with ground meat? Steaks?
    Roasts? Something wrong with those?

    I have bad teeth and those are hard to chew. One can also adjust the amount of fat with grinding meat. 
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,452 Senior Member
    Manual and small electric meat grinders are NOT expensive when buying one for home use. You're going to spend a LOT more on the meat than the grinder, in any case. I have several, and use one to make ground fish patties for frying up in a cast iron skillet. Grinding up fish for fish patties is best done with frozen fillets that are thawed to the point that they're still a little stiff.

    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=manual+meat+grinders+for+home+use&crid=1U3ELA1BT3K3F&sprefix=manual+meat+grind%2Caps%2C706&ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_17
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • N454casullN454casull Member Posts: 611 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Yes...the entire deer can be ground...done it many times...except for the backstraps...if you grind those up you go straight to hell..

    You can use venison in any recipe that calls for ground meat.

    Normally...I remove all the fat, silver skin and connective tissue from my venison then cube it up and package and freeze it as stew meat. If I have need of ground meat I run it through the grinder as needed...

    And what is your obsession with ground meat? Steaks?
    Roasts? Something wrong with those?

    I have bad teeth and those are hard to chew. One can also adjust the amount of fat with grinding meat. 



    Bad teeth, rambling posts...
  • Doves_IndefinitelyDoves_Indefinitely Posts: 126 Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Yes...the entire deer can be ground...done it many times...except for the backstraps...if you grind those up you go straight to hell..

    You can use venison in any recipe that calls for ground meat.

    Normally...I remove all the fat, silver skin and connective tissue from my venison then cube it up and package and freeze it as stew meat. If I have need of ground meat I run it through the grinder as needed...

    And what is your obsession with ground meat? Steaks?
    Roasts? Something wrong with those?

    I have bad teeth and those are hard to chew. One can also adjust the amount of fat with grinding meat. 



    Bad teeth, rambling posts.


    I'm not lying about my teeth. 
  • Some_MookSome_Mook Posts: 364 Member
    I would encourage you to use your education to do some simple searching on your own.
    In this area, you seem to be quite clueless.  Or you just like head games....
    You seem to enjoy the drama.
    Don't insult the very people you are asking questions about things you do not know.
    I would encourage you to do a lot of reading on past subjects in this forum.
    ... test the waters. If the water is too hot or too cold it wouldn't be prudent to dive into head first... 
    I am not college ed-u-mah-cated, but generally speaking it is best to know the depth of the water before diving in head first, unless of course the water you reference is the gene pool - in which case playing in the shallow end would still be safer than diving in head first.

    Here's an idea to get your wild venison on the cheap.  Rent an economy car for the best rate you can find, make sure you get the damage waiver on it and then go driving willy nilly down some back country roads at night.  Make sure you do not slow down if you see shiny things in your headlights.  If you hit a buck, keep driving (if possible) until you get yourself a doe, cut a big hunk off the hind quarters and take to your local butcher and have it ground with the added fat of your choosing.  You'll need a police report for the damage to the vehicle, but you can claim the deer without needing a hunting license.

    You'll save a lot of money going this route, no need for a .270 rifle, ammunition, hunting clothes and boots, scent blocker, etc.. and have a better chance of success within the first couple of tries as opposed to actually hunting.
    "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace." - Thomas Paine
    "I know my place in the world and it ain’t standing next to Jerry Miculek" - Zee
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,505 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Yes...the entire deer can be ground...done it many times...except for the backstraps...if you grind those up you go straight to hell..

    You can use venison in any recipe that calls for ground meat.

    Normally...I remove all the fat, silver skin and connective tissue from my venison then cube it up and package and freeze it as stew meat. If I have need of ground meat I run it through the grinder as needed...

    And what is your obsession with ground meat? Steaks?
    Roasts? Something wrong with those?

    I have bad teeth and those are hard to chew. One can also adjust the amount of fat with grinding meat. 



    Bad teeth, rambling posts...
    The Internet is yours!
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,505 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Yes...the entire deer can be ground...done it many times...except for the backstraps...if you grind those up you go straight to hell..

    You can use venison in any recipe that calls for ground meat.

    Normally...I remove all the fat, silver skin and connective tissue from my venison then cube it up and package and freeze it as stew meat. If I have need of ground meat I run it through the grinder as needed...

    And what is your obsession with ground meat? Steaks?
    Roasts? Something wrong with those?

    I have bad teeth and those are hard to chew. One can also adjust the amount of fat with grinding meat. 



    Bad teeth, rambling posts.


    I'm not lying about my teeth. 
    You gotta find a sense of humor to hang around here. Pull the stick out your back side might help a little. As well as unbuttoning the shirt a button or two. 
    Lighten up, Francis. This can be a fun place if you let it be so. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,505 Senior Member
    Some_Mook said:
    I would encourage you to use your education to do some simple searching on your own.
    In this area, you seem to be quite clueless.  Or you just like head games....
    You seem to enjoy the drama.
    Don't insult the very people you are asking questions about things you do not know.
    I would encourage you to do a lot of reading on past subjects in this forum.
    ... test the waters. If the water is too hot or too cold it wouldn't be prudent to dive into head first... 
    I am not college ed-u-mah-cated, but generally speaking it is best to know the depth of the water before diving in head first, unless of course the water you reference is the gene pool - in which case playing in the shallow end would still be safer than diving in head first.

    Here's an idea to get your wild venison on the cheap.  Rent an economy car for the best rate you can find, make sure you get the damage waiver on it and then go driving willy nilly down some back country roads at night.  Make sure you do not slow down if you see shiny things in your headlights.  If you hit a buck, keep driving (if possible) until you get yourself a doe, cut a big hunk off the hind quarters and take to your local butcher and have it ground with the added fat of your choosing.  You'll need a police report for the damage to the vehicle, but you can claim the deer without needing a hunting license.

    You'll save a lot of money going this route, no need for a .270 rifle, ammunition, hunting clothes and boots, scent blocker, etc.. and have a better chance of success within the first couple of tries as opposed to actually hunting.
    Second place is yours. 😁
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • JKPJKP Senior Member Posts: 2,270 Senior Member
    Some great laughs in this thread!
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 8,108 Senior Member
    It seems that everyone has their own idea of how to best prepare venison (or any other wild game, for that matter).  My favorite is to do the the following. 

     - use prime cuts, such as backstrap, loin or steak cutlets from the hindquarters
     - soak over night in canned milk
     - dredge in flour, milk and egg
     - chicken fry it

    If you eat any venison after my wife has cooked it like this, I'm pretty sure you'll like it.

    I've eaten it this way since I was a pup, and always liked it.  The ONLY venison I have not liked came from mule deer I killed in Colorado and Utah.  In every such instance, the deer had been feeding on sage brush.  In my humble opinion, sage brush causes the meat to be very gamey tasting.  But that's just me.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,452 Senior Member


    I would also like to try some dove breast if I can buy some of those too. 
    You an always pop some city pigeons with a pellet gun or .22 rifle with subsonic ammo. Lots more meat on a city pigeon, and they taste a bit better than a little bitty dove, IMO.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • 10canyon5310canyon53 Member Posts: 2,122 Senior Member
    Ok, starts out by saying he is on a fat restricted diet and then immediately mentions how much bacon and bacon grease he is adding.......    Sir!  Sir!  I am going to have to ask you to put the bacon down and slowly back away!.....  Yes!  Just put the bacon down slowly and nobody gets hurt......
This discussion has been closed.
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