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Im still learning about my pistol.

earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,555 Senior Member

Got this NIB in 91' or 92' as best I can remember. Been watching 1911 videos online. Didn't know I  could pull the slide rearward from the locked back position to release it. This pistol came perfectly set up from the factory near as I can tell. And I've some how managed not to harm it a bit. The bushing is snug. The slide stop pin shows two perfect marks from supporting the rear of the barrel. My friend and I fit the new trigger like the amateur hacks we are. It actually fits ok, but the gun don't care. It runs and runs and runs. The only flaw I can find on it is microscopic play in the plunger tube. Ive got extra recoil and fp springs. Im going to get a shock buffer for the guide rod eventually. Maybe in another 20 or 30 years I'll know everything about it.

Replies

  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,075 Senior Member
    Pretty!

    Pass on the shock buffer - just run the next-step-up-from-GI 18.5# recoil spring andGI-standard 23# main spring.  Not so much an issue on the full size Government Models, but the shock buffs do limit your slide travel by their 1/8" or so thickness.  They can take an Officer's Model right to the point of the slide running out of rearward movement RIGHT after the breech face clears the back of the mag well.  Reduces the momentum from the  "running start" you want the slide to have before it encounters resistance from the round stack and feed ramp.  Can't help your ejection either.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,583 Senior Member
    I concur with Bigslug...it ain't broke...nothing to "fix"...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,555 Senior Member
    Sounds like good advice!

    I don't think I ever get tired of learning about these things. I was looking at the breech lock up while I had the slide off. Using a snap cap, it looks like the extractor really does hold the cartridge against the breech face. Maybe Colt quality ain't what it used to be,  but the new Colt mag I bought runs great.
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,313 Senior Member
    Afaik, play in the plunger tube isnt an issue.  Or at least what info ive read over the years.

    The shock buffer is up to you.  Buy my LGS who was a 1911 guru never used them. Especially after getting them in from customers where the buffer goes bad and falls apart in the gun locking things up.

    But thats how he made money too.
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,555 Senior Member
    edited July 12 #6
    Im easily convinced not to buy extra parts I don't need. Glad to hear that tube is good. I think Colt did a first rate job on it. Took me along time  to really start to appreciate it.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,583 Senior Member
    Somewhere around here, I have a copy of the original manual for the 1911....there is a chapter on shooting from horseback...the part that really gave me a chuckle was "Do not fire over the horse's head...it irritates the horse"
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,555 Senior Member
    I don't think we can hold that against them. 
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 23,360 Senior Member
    if it does what you want/expect it to do.........don’t JACK with it!!!
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,555 Senior Member
    I see the light!
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,075 Senior Member
    The plunger tube is something you'll want to deal with or have dealt with.  Not an issue until it's an issue. . .and then you've got issues when it pops out.  The staking tools come with a support rod that fills the tube to keep it from getting crushed when you clamp it down with either a vise-grip or thumbscrew style stake.

    I've taken to flushing the gap between tube and frame with acetone and then filling it with red Loctite to maximize the force it's going to take to get it wiggling again.  Just make sure to run a pipe cleaner through the tube and all surrounding areas afterwards.


    I was looking at the breech lock up while I had the slide off. Using a snap cap, it looks like the extractor really does hold the cartridge against the breech face. Maybe Colt quality ain't what it used to be,  but the new Colt mag I bought runs great.
    The function check for extractor tension is to slide a live round (or correctly weighted dummy for the safety-paranoid) under the extractor hook.  Light shaking should give you some rattle, but it should not fall off.  If it does, pull the extractor halfway out of its tunnel so that the "bulge" in its middle is at the rear of the slide, rotate it 180 degrees and push on its rear to increase the inward bend.  DO NOT APPLY GORILLA FORCE!  Reinsert, retest, and re-tweak as needed.

    The sign of problems there is failure to properly eject brass, which means the brass isn't clamped enough by the extractor for the ejector to give its proper kick.


    I don't think I ever get tired of learning about these things. 
    When you really start taking his stuff apart and looking at how it runs, and then look at how differently all his stuff runs, you REALLY start to get a feel for the level of genius Browning was operating at.  Where all the Stephen Hawkings and Neil DeGrasse Tysons go on about Einstein, JMB was on the same kind of plane.  

    Interestingly, one of his designs that has most blown my mind is one of his simplest - the Winchester bolt action single shot .22 that grew from the model 1900 to the 67. It has one part serving the function of sear, extractor, and IIRC, ejector - or maybe partial ejector in conjunction with the firing pin, and it does all those operations on one leaf spring.

    That combination leaf spring under your 1911's mainspring housing - same kind of thing.  Powers the sear engagement, disconnector, trigger return, and grip safety, and it's just one part.

    So where a modern manufacturer might get fast and cheap production through the use of lots of stampings and roll pins, John got it done with BRAINS.  Einstein's brain ended up in a jar for study somewhere - - would have been neat to have a neurologist compare him, JMB, Hiram Maxim, Tesla, etc... to see what, if anything, all those Greek gods walking the earth had in common.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,313 Senior Member
    If the recoil spring tube is an issue for you, take it to a gunsmith and let them look at it. express your concerns and see what they say.  you could do this for anything and any gun too.

    FWIW, i have an 70s Colt 1911 and the spring tube has that birds beak to grab the recoil spring. Its allows you to screw it onto the recoil spring but when i remove the bushing i dont expect it to stay on the spring.  I also have other 1911s without that feature too.  IIRC, dont have it pointed to your face when doing it and pay attention to where its pointed when removing the bushing.  I think someone broke a window when it flew off the spring.

    but even with it "loose" its not been able to move past the bushing.

    something else.  If yours has the internal extractor, dont hand feed any rounds into the chamber and drop/release the slide.  you may end up breaking your extractor and any replacement may need to be tuned to your gun.


    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,555 Senior Member
    Sounds like some book shopping might be next.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 23,187 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    if it does what you want/expect it to do.........don’t JACK with it!!!
    See the "universal troubleshooting chart" for details... ;)
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,075 Senior Member
    ilove22s said:

    FWIW, i have an 70s Colt 1911 and the spring tube has that birds beak to grab the recoil spring. Its allows you to screw it onto the recoil spring but when i remove the bushing i dont expect it to stay on the spring.  I also have other 1911s without that feature too.  IIRC, dont have it pointed to your face when doing it and pay attention to where its pointed when removing the bushing.  I think someone broke a window when it flew off the spring.
    Ahh yes, the old "Sub-Orbital Flight of Recoil Spring Plunger" phenomenon.  :D

    Cylinder & Slide still makes the GI style plunger with the cutout for threading onto the recoil spring.  A nice addition and cheap if you aren't running that way already.

    Regardless of the presence of that cutout or not, my technique for avoiding launch is the same:

    1. Clear gun and put the safety on.  This keeps the slide from moving backwards as you press on the plunger.

    2.  With the gun pointed upward and the empty mag well facing you, insert your right pinky finger into the triggerguard, wrap your next three fingers over the top of the slide, and depress the plunger with your thumb, trying for maximum surface coverage..

    3.  Left hand rotates the barrel bushing out of the way.

    4.  Right thumb EEEEEEEASES off.

    5.  Safety off, slide back, disassemble as normal.  Reassemble in reverse,

    Best of luck!  ;)
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,555 Senior Member
    Ive got a dimpled spring plug. I got so I wouldn't lose it it changing the 22 conversion kit at the range.

    Breamfisher show'd me how to substitute an empty cartridge case if I do lose thw plug......
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 4,723 Senior Member
    As much as I love the classic 1911 I HAVE TO add a beavertail safety to my modern ones or I get savagely bitten.  I have an unmolested Series 70 and my beloved Remington-Rand with the classic grip safety and before I take them to the range I put two layers of surgical tape on the web of my hand because who wants to bleed all over a nice blue guns, and I won't modify those two.  I choke on the guns way high and ride the safety with my thumb so there is no way to avoid it for me without having to change my grip.  Other than that 1911's are like mothers milk to me and your's is a good one!!!
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,583 Senior Member
    Used to have that same problem with my milsurp 1911s...I just bobbed the hammer before beaver-tails became a thing...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 4,723 Senior Member
    Jayhawker said:
    Used to have that same problem with my milsurp 1911s...I just bobbed the hammer before beaver-tails became a thing...
    That’s how Detonics fixed the issue too back in the 80s.  Works well!
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,313 Senior Member
    GunNut said:
    As much as I love the classic 1911 I HAVE TO add a beavertail safety to my modern ones or I get savagely bitten.  I have an unmolested Series 70 and my beloved Remington-Rand with the classic grip safety and before I take them to the range I put two layers of surgical tape on the web of my hand because who wants to bleed all over a nice blue guns, and I won't modify those two.  I choke on the guns way high and ride the safety with my thumb so there is no way to avoid it for me without having to change my grip.  Other than that 1911's are like mothers milk to me and your's is a good one!!!
    fwiw,

    you can add a beavertail to those guns.  I would just keep and ID the OEMs so that they can be swapped out when you want.

    i dont mind modding a gun with drop in parts or parts that may need minor mods.  I try to mod the part, no the parts around it so that if/when i sell i can just add the OEM parts and they new owner can do what they want.
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 4,723 Senior Member
    ilove22s said:
    GunNut said:
    As much as I love the classic 1911 I HAVE TO add a beavertail safety to my modern ones or I get savagely bitten.  I have an unmolested Series 70 and my beloved Remington-Rand with the classic grip safety and before I take them to the range I put two layers of surgical tape on the web of my hand because who wants to bleed all over a nice blue guns, and I won't modify those two.  I choke on the guns way high and ride the safety with my thumb so there is no way to avoid it for me without having to change my grip.  Other than that 1911's are like mothers milk to me and your's is a good one!!!
    fwiw,

    you can add a beavertail to those guns.  I would just keep and ID the OEMs so that they can be swapped out when you want.

    i dont mind modding a gun with drop in parts or parts that may need minor mods.  I try to mod the part, no the parts around it so that if/when i sell i can just add the OEM parts and they new owner can do what they want.
    I thought about doing that and as a matter of fact I did replace the factory Series 70 grips with slim rosewood because I prefer those.  I have the originals packed and clearly marked.  But reality is neither one is an EDC gun.  More like a Sunday-Go-To-Meeting guns and as such there’s no point in investing any time/money into mods.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,555 Senior Member
    When I learn something new I get excited. Maybe why guns become better with age.
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