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questions about cowboy guns

Moose_HollandMoose_Holland Posts: 9 New Member
edited July 30 in General Firearms #1
Do you own any cowboy guns? Are they cheap replicas as those imported from Italy, modern reproductions made by original American gunmakers or are they originals made by original manufacturers? Has Remington ever made a modern reproduction of the 1875 Outlaw? It's kind of nice to own cowboy guns built by the original makers. When was the last genuine Sharps buffalo gun produced? 

Colt makes modern reproductions of Peacemakers and Winchester makes reproductions of late 1880's rifles and carbines. Does any person here have any of those guns? Some American-made reproductions can be quite expensive. Modern-made Stoeger coach guns aren't too expensive, however. 

The .45 Colt is an authentic caliber for pre-1900 S/A pistols. What are authentic pre-1900 calibers for Winchester lever rifles and carbines? If I were to own coboy gun reproductions, I would want authentic (historically correct) calibers of that period. Did cowboys of the Old West have Winchesters chambered in .45 Colt? I thought .30-30 Win. was the common lever rifle round then. I'm certain .375 Mag. was not around then. 
 
Do you shoot them for fun or in competition? Do you twirl them for showmanship? Do any of them even make good defense weapons or hunting implements in modern times? Here are few examples of classic American cowboy guns-

https://imgur.com/SsEAxlx


Replies

  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 3,890 Senior Member
    Ruger Vaquero's for American made copies of the single action army but the Uberti copies are generally very good quality. Current Winchester lever actions I believe are made in Japan. Good quality but not made in U.S.A. And again, the Uberti copies are hard to beat.
    Sharps rifles can be had from "The Sharps Rifle Co" and  "C.Sharps Arms" both out of Montana. Once more the Uberti's are fine copies at less money. 
  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,927 Senior Member
    I believe the 30-30 made its appearance around 1894, hence the model number of the Winchester '94.  As for earlier chamberings, I'm thinking 38-55 and 44-40 were pretty popular, but am by no means an expert.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
  • AlleyCatAlleyCat Posts: 361 Member
    edited July 30 #4
     Did cowboys of the Old West have Winchesters chambered in .45 Colt?

    No.

     I'm certain .375 Mag. was not around then. 


    .375 Mag?
    Which Winchester/Colt would that be chambered for.

     Do you twirl them for showmanship?
    All the time, In front of the mirror, buck nekked but for my cowboy hat on my head.


     If I were to own coboy gun reproductions, I would want authentic (historically correct) calibers of that period.


    Coboy guns are like unicorn horn.






  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,823 Senior Member
    Don't just limit your self to Winchesters or Colts. Marlin rifles were ahead of their time, with the 1881's, 1889, and 1893's for a start. Lots of them out there and not over priced like the Winny's. My 1881 in .40-60 is my favorite shooter. Lots of other fun calibers, too, like the .32-40, .32-20, .38-55 previously mentioned, all old BP rounds that can be updated with smoke less. 
    The 1881 was the first large frame lever gun to chamber the .45-70, five years ahead of the 1886 Winc.
    1889 was the first side eject, and the 1893 morphed into the 336.
    1873 Winchesters are fun guns, well made and in fun calibers .32-20, 38-40 and 44-40. 
    The Italian made clones are well made and shoot and look great. 
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,914 Senior Member
    One thing to be clear about...those "Italian guns" by Uberti and Pedersoli are of equal, probably better, quality than those turned out by turned out by the original makers, due to modern materials and machining.

    The Ruger Vaqueros are equal to any SAA turned out by Colt....ever


    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,144 Senior Member
    I do have a couple of 'cowboy' guns:





    An Italian Pietta SAA clone in .357 Magnum that is an absolute hoot to shoot.  I pair that up with the Marlin lever action or the Rossi Mares leg, and go on a woods walk.

    Now- for TRUE cowboy guns, the most cowboy person I ever dealt with kept just a single shot .410 in his truck.  He was 96 years old when I was working for him on his ranch north of Harper, TX, and was truly someone who had "been there" for cowboy stuff.  

    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • Moose_HollandMoose_Holland Posts: 9 New Member
    AlleyCat said:
     Did cowboys of the Old West have Winchesters chambered in .45 Colt?

    No.

     I'm certain .375 Mag. was not around then. 


    .375 Mag?
    Which Winchester/Colt would that be chambered for.

     Do you twirl them for showmanship?
    All the time, In front of the mirror, buck nekked but for my cowboy hat on my head.


     If I were to own coboy gun reproductions, I would want authentic (historically correct) calibers of that period.


    Coboy guns are like unicorn horn.





    GOT BEAT BY THE BELL TO EDIT OP ERRORS.

    .357 MAGNUM NOT .375 Mag.

    COWBOY GUNS



  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,914 Senior Member

    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Moose_HollandMoose_Holland Posts: 9 New Member
    When was the last American-made Winchester lever job made?  Which authentic pre-1900 caliber is best for woods deer hunting? Does a Saddle-Ring Carbine make a great deer gun? 

    I'm also saddened that the Savage Model 99 lever job with exclusive rotary magazine is extinct from the production line. My grandfather had one in .300 Savage but the gunsmith inspected it and said it was a wall-hanger: too badly rusted for economically-feasible restoration. 
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,914 Senior Member
    edited July 30 #11

    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 16,914 Senior Member

    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 5,760 Senior Member
    edited July 30 #13
    Ok since It’s show-n-tell time 😁


    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,755 Senior Member
    edited July 30 #14
    When was the last American-made Winchester lever job made?  Which authentic pre-1900 caliber is best for woods deer hunting? Does a Saddle-Ring Carbine make a great deer gun? 

    I'm also saddened that the Savage Model 99 lever job with exclusive rotary magazine is extinct from the production line. My grandfather had one in .300 Savage but the gunsmith inspected it and said it was a wall-hanger: too badly rusted for economically-feasible restoration. 
    Nonsense! "economically-feasible" means he doesn't want the work. Keep looking. Grand pa's gun is always worth saving. Parts for a 99 are easy to come by. You will not regret it when you carry it in the field for the first time and pass it on to your kids. 300 Savage is a very good cartridge. Post some pics, there are a lot of gun restoration junkies on this site, myself included. I personally carry a Savage 99f in 308 that I resurrected.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,823 Senior Member
    I have four 1899 takedowns and they all function and shoot great!! I've restored a few, fine rifles!!
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 11,729 Senior Member
    Not to change the subject, but is there a difference between a Savage 1899 and a Savage 99? 
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 6,748 Senior Member
    Im guessing the 1899's magazine could be a bit complicated. As compared to a detachable box.....
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,386 Senior Member
    too many questions for me.

    but you can find reproductions of guns.  IF they are are the historically correct caliber, i will let you figure that out or someone can tell you.

    there are also Black Poweder (BP) revolvers and riles too.  You may want to do some reserach on WHEN or WHAT PERIOD you want to do your toy buying.  

    with the Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS) going on there are more choices now for toys.

    and fwiw, you dont say what your endgame is on the all of the questions..

    a hint and assumption.   If you want to play CAS then you may want to attend an event if you can.  You dont have any location in your profile, but from what ive read CAS is sort of a world wide sport.  Dont know about places that are anti gun, but i would look for any CAS competitions in your area and attend if you can.  Go with all of your questions on a note pad.   Introduce yourself if you want to do the sport and ask some questions.  

    If this is your endgame, you may find out that they are receptive of new blood.  If not, sports die off.

    good luck
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,026 Senior Member
    ilove22s said:
    too many questions for me.

    Me too.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,689 Senior Member
    Not cowboy per se but a few cowboy-esque if you want: A Marlin 1894c, a Rossi 92, a Ruger Blackhawk and a Super Single Six. Replicas are seldom seen here and original ones when found are usually too fragile, worn down or lacking ammo to use.
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,450 Senior Member
    Last American made Winchester was in 2005. I have one a 45 colt 94. A strange combination but fun gun nonetheless. 
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 12,621 Senior Member
    Welcome hey, obviously you are into cowboy stuff, how do you feel about gladiator movies?
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Moose_HollandMoose_Holland Posts: 9 New Member
    edited July 31 #23
    Gene L said:
    Not to change the subject, but is there a difference between a Savage 1899 and a Savage 99? 
    I believe they are one in the same. Grandpa's gun had the 1899 patent date on it. At first I thought it might have been built that year but I found out just yesterday Model 99's were produced from 1899 until 1998. Gramp's gun might have been built later on.  I acquired the gun from mom's estate in 1993 along with a few other guns. A buddy of mine knew a gunsmith personally so I had this man bring in Gramp's Savage 99 for an appraisal. I was told the gun would not be safe to fire nor would it be worth trying to restore. So, I just kept it as a keepsake.  The Savage had no floor plate or magazine tube so I always wondered how the devil one loaded the gun. I looked into the ejection port with the action open and noted what appeared to be a rotary part at the bottom of the inside of the receiver and figured it must be some kind of rotating feeding device to feed the rounds and figured one had to push rounds in from the top. It's the damnedest gun design I have ever known. Pushing my fingers inside the receiver I could make the rotary part turn some. I learned years later from watching YouTube that this indeed was a rotary magazine. 

    Sadly that gun and several others of mine were lost to me in 1999 from a home burglary and were never recovered.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKXn-x1GEHE
  • AlleyCatAlleyCat Posts: 361 Member
    edited July 31 #24
    ilove22s said:
    too many questions for me.

    He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named may have returned.   :D

  • AlleyCatAlleyCat Posts: 361 Member

    Sadly that gun and several others of mine were lost to me in 1999 from a home burglary and were never recovered.


    The '06 Frisco quake got all of mine.


  • AlleyCatAlleyCat Posts: 361 Member
    edited July 31 #26


    AlleyCat said:
    ilove22s said:
    too many questions for me.

    He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named may have returned.   :D


    Dagnabbit just call me Dawg.

    Deputy Dawg.    >:)







  • JerryBobCoJerryBobCo Senior Member Posts: 7,927 Senior Member
    When was the last American-made Winchester lever job made?  Which authentic pre-1900 caliber is best for woods deer hunting? Does a Saddle-Ring Carbine make a great deer gun? 

    I'm also saddened that the Savage Model 99 lever job with exclusive rotary magazine is extinct from the production line. My grandfather had one in .300 Savage but the gunsmith inspected it and said it was a wall-hanger: too badly rusted for economically-feasible restoration. 
    I can answer some of this.  Your question about with caliber is best for woods deer hunting is kind of like asking how long is a piece of string.  It depends.  Of the pre-1900 chamberings, the 30-30 is the most widely used.  Whether or not it's the best is a matter of personal opinion.

    I have (had) a friend who loved  the saddle ring carbines, and hunted deer with them.  For him, it would be safe to say it made a great deer gun.
    Jerry

    Gun control laws make about as much sense as taking ex-lax to cure a cough.
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