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Help with weed ID...

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  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,088 Senior Member
    When I lived in KS we spent days eradicating Musk Thistle...Before the thing goes to seed, we would cut down the plants, dig up the roots and bag the whole shebang..taping up the bag when full...acres of the damn things.

    At the end of the day we would build a roaring fire and consign the to the flames.

    Those things were so invasive, if the county agent saw one growing in your pasture, you'd get a phone call...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,453 Senior Member
    Birds were and are a great propagator of the Canadian thistle. They eat the seeds, their digestive tract doesn't digest them all, and they poop the seeds out with that packet of fertilizer. Birds spread a lot of nasty weeds that way. They also spread Mary Jane seeds that way, too. And Mourning Doves spread ragweed seed like crazy, danged doves LOVE ragweed seeds. Big seeds that don't always get ground up in the crop and get deposited with that packet of fertilizer.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,326 Senior Member
    When I had the horses it was a losing battle.  There’s no way to effectively weed once you get past a few acres.  Every few years we would just kill EVERYTHING in a paddock.  Till the whole thing, fertilize and seed to start again with fresh grass.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    edited September 2020 #35
    tennmike said:
    Twinkle said:
    The little patch of Canadian thistle just on the other side of the fence is what did it to my yard.  I hate 'em!  I won't use chemicals because I grow food back there, so I just go at 'em whenever one pops up and two or three times a year I cut them down on the lot next door. :s

    After cutting the stalk of the thistle close to the ground, split the stalk still attached to the root and pour a little Chlorox bleach in the splits in the stalk. A turkey baster is good for that job, and the plastic ones are cheap. The bleach kills the root and keeps it from sprouting back. No methyl ethyl bad stuff herbicide needed.
    Thanks!  I will definitely try this!  As an avid crafter, I have a ton of syringes that I use with blunt-tipped needles for applying glue.  This is a tool that would work quite well!

  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,453 Senior Member
    edited September 2020 #36
    Twinkle said:
    tennmike said:
    Twinkle said:
    The little patch of Canadian thistle just on the other side of the fence is what did it to my yard.  I hate 'em!  I won't use chemicals because I grow food back there, so I just go at 'em whenever one pops up and two or three times a year I cut them down on the lot next door. :s

    After cutting the stalk of the thistle close to the ground, split the stalk still attached to the root and pour a little Chlorox bleach in the splits in the stalk. A turkey baster is good for that job, and the plastic ones are cheap. The bleach kills the root and keeps it from sprouting back. No methyl ethyl bad stuff herbicide needed.
    Thanks!  I will definitely try this!  As an avid crafter, I have a ton of syringes that I use with blunt-tipped needles for applying glue.  This is a tool that would work quite well!

    Just make sure you split the stalk well before trying to inject with a syringe as 'blowback' of the  bleach on you is  a definite possibility. That blowback thing is why I use the cheapo turkey baster squeeze bulb thing. For in the yard Canadian  thistles I use a cheap Chinese 1/2 inch wide wood chisel and a hammer to do the splitting into a + shape; gets the stalk split deep, Then dribble in the bleach. This works on most woody stalk weeds like thistle, and works pretty good on tree sprouts about thumb size, too. It works as the bleach breaks down the cells of the plant and they rot.

    Another thing about the bleach; it makes a dandy stump remover, too. Just drill a bunch of DEEP holes in the stump with a 1/2" wood bit and pour bleach in the holes to the top surface of the stump. Keep them filled with beach and in about a year the stump just crumbles up. Same cell destruction and rot removes it.

      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • TwinkleTwinkle Posts: 174 Member
    edited September 2020 #37
    tennmike said:
    Twinkle said:
    tennmike said:
    Twinkle said:
    The little patch of Canadian thistle just on the other side of the fence is what did it to my yard.  I hate 'em!  I won't use chemicals because I grow food back there, so I just go at 'em whenever one pops up and two or three times a year I cut them down on the lot next door. :s

    After cutting the stalk of the thistle close to the ground, split the stalk still attached to the root and pour a little Chlorox bleach in the splits in the stalk. A turkey baster is good for that job, and the plastic ones are cheap. The bleach kills the root and keeps it from sprouting back. No methyl ethyl bad stuff herbicide needed.
    Thanks!  I will definitely try this!  As an avid crafter, I have a ton of syringes that I use with blunt-tipped needles for applying glue.  This is a tool that would work quite well!

    Just make sure you split the stalk well before trying to inject with a syringe as 'blowback' of the  bleach on you is  a definite possibility. That blowback thing is why I use the cheapo turkey baster squeeze bulb thing. For in the yard Canadian  thistles I use a cheap Chinese 1/2 inch wide wood chisel and a hammer to do the splitting into a + shape; gets the stalk split deep, Then dribble in the bleach. This works on most woody stalk weeds like thistle, and works pretty good on tree sprouts about thumb size, too. It works as the bleach breaks down the cells of the plant and they rot.

    Another thing about the bleach; it makes a dandy stump remover, too. Just drill a bunch of DEEP holes in the stump with a 1/2" wood bit and pour bleach in the holes to the top surface of the stump. Keep them filled with beach and in about a year the stump just crumbles up. Same cell destruction and rot removes it.

    Oh, I have some cheap plastic lab pipettes that would probably work well for that "dribbling" action.  I knew I saved 'em for a good reason!
    Thanks for all the info!

  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,326 Senior Member
    tennmike said:
    Twinkle said:
    tennmike said:
    Twinkle said:
    The little patch of Canadian thistle just on the other side of the fence is what did it to my yard.  I hate 'em!  I won't use chemicals because I grow food back there, so I just go at 'em whenever one pops up and two or three times a year I cut them down on the lot next door. :s

    After cutting the stalk of the thistle close to the ground, split the stalk still attached to the root and pour a little Chlorox bleach in the splits in the stalk. A turkey baster is good for that job, and the plastic ones are cheap. The bleach kills the root and keeps it from sprouting back. No methyl ethyl bad stuff herbicide needed.
    Thanks!  I will definitely try this!  As an avid crafter, I have a ton of syringes that I use with blunt-tipped needles for applying glue.  This is a tool that would work quite well!

    Just make sure you split the stalk well before trying to inject with a syringe as 'blowback' of the  bleach on you is  a definite possibility. That blowback thing is why I use the cheapo turkey baster squeeze bulb thing. For in the yard Canadian  thistles I use a cheap Chinese 1/2 inch wide wood chisel and a hammer to do the splitting into a + shape; gets the stalk split deep, Then dribble in the bleach. This works on most woody stalk weeds like thistle, and works pretty good on tree sprouts about thumb size, too. It works as the bleach breaks down the cells of the plant and they rot.

    Another thing about the bleach; it makes a dandy stump remover, too. Just drill a bunch of DEEP holes in the stump with a 1/2" wood bit and pour bleach in the holes to the top surface of the stump. Keep them filled with beach and in about a year the stump just crumbles up. Same cell destruction and rot removes it.

    Is that how you take care of the bod... eviden... stumps on your property?  >:)
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 7,927 Senior Member
    I've used Epson Salts to kill stumps, bleach is a new method to try.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,453 Senior Member
    Big Al1 said:
    I've used Epson Salts to kill stumps, bleach is a new method to try.
    My Dad worked in a paper mill for around 40 years, so I know a bit about the chemicals they used to break down the wood fibers. Chlorine bleach broke down the wood fibers and bleached the fiber white, too. They used less chlorine for brown wrapper paper, and a little more for bleaching newsprint paper, and a LOT for white paper used for writing and books and the like. Also, the length of the wood chips were varied for the different papers; long fiber for brown wrapper, a lot shorter for writing paper and book paper, and newsprint paper was longer than writing paper. Different lengths for different paper strength. Poopy paper, which they didn't make has really short fibers; don't want to sandpaper and stick splinters in the backside! :D 

    And now for something totally different. Never, ever, burn a stump out close to a house. The fire will keep burning below ground turning the roots into charcoal due to lack of oxygen. And if the roots run under the house, they can start the house on fire unless it's built on a concrete slab or has a full basement. Seen a few old houses built the old way on piers go up in flames because of that fire running along the underground roots. Makes for exciting times for the occupants. Those dry floor joists go up quick.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
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