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Cleaning rifles... Blue, blue and more blue!

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Replies

  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,513 Senior Member
    edited September 2020 #32
    I use the standard pellets. Not the ones with the extra abrasive in them. 
    Since I use the larger pellets and get more resistance....I don’t need/want the added abrasive. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,113 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    I use the standard pellets. Not the ones with the extra abrasive in them. 
    Since I use the larger pellets and get more resistance....I don’t need/want the added abrasive. 
    Zee,

    Quick question, whether pushing a dry plug or a plug with solvent, using the next size up do you run into resistance issues pushing them through the bore, where you really need to push hard? On a normal cleaning how many of those plugs do you use?

    Thanks
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,513 Senior Member
    edited September 2020 #34
    Zee said:
    I use the standard pellets. Not the ones with the extra abrasive in them. 
    Since I use the larger pellets and get more resistance....I don’t need/want the added abrasive. 
    Zee,

    Quick question, whether pushing a dry plug or a plug with solvent, using the next size up do you run into resistance issues pushing them through the bore, where you really need to push hard? On a normal cleaning how many of those plugs do you use?

    Thanks
    Yes, i get more resistance and friction so as I have to push harder.  But, not as to bending of the rod. 

    Typically only need 5 (+/-) pellets per cleaning. I scrub back and forth with one pellet until it falls off. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,113 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    Zee said:
    I use the standard pellets. Not the ones with the extra abrasive in them. 
    Since I use the larger pellets and get more resistance....I don’t need/want the added abrasive. 
    Zee,

    Quick question, whether pushing a dry plug or a plug with solvent, using the next size up do you run into resistance issues pushing them through the bore, where you really need to push hard? On a normal cleaning how many of those plugs do you use?

    Thanks
    Yes, i get more resistance and friction so as I have to push harder.  But, not as to bending of the rod. 

    Typically only need 5 (+/-) pellets per cleaning. I scrub back and forth with one pellet until it falls off. 
    Thanks for answering the question I didn't ask, which was when you push hard does it bend the rod!  Getting ready to order some.  Thanks for your responses!
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,251 Senior Member
    GunNut,

    Just to reiterate.....KG Products bore cleaning stuff is fantastic. I own (or have tried) practically every magic elixer out there, and anything KG puts out is head and shoulders above a similar product put out by any of their competitors.

    know this. A Hawkeye borescope takes you down to detail so fine you'll lose track of space and time. 

    And in answer to an earlier post....Boresnakes pull out loose crud, but do practically no real cleaning chores.

    I'll admit, I'm a bit anal about borecleaning, and I'm likely too harsh a judge of products for the "average" user (if there is such a thing), but back to back (sometimes 3) 500 p'dog days makes you so. I had to find a way to get rid of heavy carbon and copper fouling fast. KG products work. Better than any others I've tried.

    And to discuss more fully a point Jeff brought up....."spotless" cleaning. My first .223 Rem barrel had a tiny stubborn spot of copper about 8" from the throat that took a bit more scrubbing than the rest of the barrel to remove. I eventually noticed that if I completely removed that spot, it was back, full size, after the next firing....but, if I quit as soon as the rest of the bore was clean.....it was still there but no larger after the next firing. It takes a good borescope to see stuff like this, but interesting nonetheless. I'm guessing that spot was simply a well-patched pot-hole.

    IMO....lacking a borescope, once you've gotten rid of the dark blue and continued patches yield just a faint trace of blue, you're probably scrubbing a spot that shouldn't be scrubbed.

    Mike


    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,326 Senior Member


    IMO....lacking a borescope, once you've gotten rid of the dark blue and continued patches yield just a faint trace of blue, you're probably scrubbing a spot that shouldn't be scrubbed.

    Mike


    Interesting point!
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,113 Senior Member
    GunNut,

    Just to reiterate.....KG Products bore cleaning stuff is fantastic. I own (or have tried) practically every magic elixer out there, and anything KG puts out is head and shoulders above a similar product put out by any of their competitors.

    know this. A Hawkeye borescope takes you down to detail so fine you'll lose track of space and time. 

    And in answer to an earlier post....Boresnakes pull out loose crud, but do practically no real cleaning chores.

    I'll admit, I'm a bit anal about borecleaning, and I'm likely too harsh a judge of products for the "average" user (if there is such a thing), but back to back (sometimes 3) 500 p'dog days makes you so. I had to find a way to get rid of heavy carbon and copper fouling fast. KG products work. Better than any others I've tried.

    And to discuss more fully a point Jeff brought up....."spotless" cleaning. My first .223 Rem barrel had a tiny stubborn spot of copper about 8" from the throat that took a bit more scrubbing than the rest of the barrel to remove. I eventually noticed that if I completely removed that spot, it was back, full size, after the next firing....but, if I quit as soon as the rest of the bore was clean.....it was still there but no larger after the next firing. It takes a good borescope to see stuff like this, but interesting nonetheless. I'm guessing that spot was simply a well-patched pot-hole.

    IMO....lacking a borescope, once you've gotten rid of the dark blue and continued patches yield just a faint trace of blue, you're probably scrubbing a spot that shouldn't be scrubbed.

    Mike


    GunNut,

    Just to reiterate.....KG Products bore cleaning stuff is fantastic. I own (or have tried) practically every magic elixer out there, and anything KG puts out is head and shoulders above a similar product put out by any of their competitors.

    know this. A Hawkeye borescope takes you down to detail so fine you'll lose track of space and time. 

    And in answer to an earlier post....Boresnakes pull out loose crud, but do practically no real cleaning chores.

    I'll admit, I'm a bit anal about borecleaning, and I'm likely too harsh a judge of products for the "average" user (if there is such a thing), but back to back (sometimes 3) 500 p'dog days makes you so. I had to find a way to get rid of heavy carbon and copper fouling fast. KG products work. Better than any others I've tried.

    And to discuss more fully a point Jeff brought up....."spotless" cleaning. My first .223 Rem barrel had a tiny stubborn spot of copper about 8" from the throat that took a bit more scrubbing than the rest of the barrel to remove. I eventually noticed that if I completely removed that spot, it was back, full size, after the next firing....but, if I quit as soon as the rest of the bore was clean.....it was still there but no larger after the next firing. It takes a good borescope to see stuff like this, but interesting nonetheless. I'm guessing that spot was simply a well-patched pot-hole.

    IMO....lacking a borescope, once you've gotten rid of the dark blue and continued patches yield just a faint trace of blue, you're probably scrubbing a spot that shouldn't be scrubbed.

    Mike


    Exactly what Mike said!  Without a borescope you're just  tooten into the wind!  
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,513 Senior Member
    I’ve been tooting in the wind for a long time with acceptable results, then. 

    Must be a good tooter. 😁
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,251 Senior Member
    I don't think Jeff was saying acceptable results can't be obtained without a borescope. Just saying that without a borescope opinions/theories are simply that. Hell...I blinded myself in one eye for 10 minutes today trying to peer down a .080"  diameter hole only 1.5" deep with an LED light. I couldn't have spotted a 12 lb loggerhead in a 22 cal bore if I'd tried. :)

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • JaphyJaphy Posts: 68 Member
    This thread has me worried. Just did some quick mental math and I am certain my Ruger MKII has had 50,000+ Rds through it. I clean it after every few hundred. But have never used a brush. I don’t rememberer using anything but cooper plated ammo. So is the barrel full of copper???
    it runs great and it’s more accurate than I am
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 6,326 Senior Member
    Japhy said:
    This thread has me worried. Just did some quick mental math and I am certain my Ruger MKII has had 50,000+ Rds through it. I clean it after every few hundred. But have never used a brush. I don’t rememberer using anything but cooper plated ammo. So is the barrel full of copper???
    it runs great and it’s more accurate than I am
    Nope, .22s are a different animal.  Many folks won’t even bother cleaning a .22 barrel.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • JaphyJaphy Posts: 68 Member
    Good to know!  I like this forum I learn something every time I am here.

    Then copper deposits must come from copper jacketed bullets?

    I will check the .44 super Blackhawk.  How many rounds? I know a lot of black crud comes out after even a dozen rounds. Always use Federal jhp.
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 24,513 Senior Member
    edited September 2020 #44
    A bore scope tells you the specifics to particulars regarding the intricacies of nothing but what the barrel says pertaining to the  parameters of accuracy. 

    In other words........listen to the barrel. Not the bore scope. 

    When it shoots, it shoots. When it doesn’t. Clean it!  Science!!!

    Repeat as often as necessary. 

    I’m here all day. 😎
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,251 Senior Member
    Japhy said:
    Good to know!  I like this forum I learn something every time I am here.

    Then copper deposits must come from copper jacketed bullets?

    I will check the .44 super Blackhawk.  How many rounds? I know a lot of black crud comes out after even a dozen rounds. Always use Federal jhp.
    The black crud is carbon. Copper solvents have little effect on carbon except to wet it down a little, and carbon solvents do nothing at all to copper buildup. Sometimes, depending on the qty of shots fired and the degree of cooling between shot strings, you may have multiple layers of both. But, in most cases, copper clings to the bore itself, while carbon clings to the copper. Copper is the most difficult to remove, but, carbon deposits in the corners where the lands meet the grooves can be a bit difficult too.

    Mike
    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
  • LinefinderLinefinder Moderator Posts: 7,251 Senior Member
    Japhy, as to the .22 rimfire....the bullets are lead with a waxy lube coating They generate neither the pressure nor velocity required to create a "metal" buildup.  OTOH, the lube itself can coat the bore and attract dust, dirt, etc. Punching out the bore occasionally with any brand/type of cleaning solvent isn't a bad idea. You're simply removing, in effect, grease.

    Mike


    "Walking away seems to be a lost art form."
    N454casull
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