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Long term storage

FreezerFreezer Senior MemberPosts: 1,934 Senior Member
edited October 2020 in General Firearms #1
My nephew handed me a Remington 511. Barrel date has it manufactured in Oct 1951 and it showed its age. This one and another looked like they stood in the corner of a barn after bubba got bored. There were a lot of dings and scratches, I removed most with steam. The bluing was fair with minor pitting on the exterior of one side of the barrel. I used Oxphoblue on all the metal with great results. I sanded the stock and used Permalyn sealer and finish on it. I used three cots of sealer and four coats of finish and I have a nice soft  satin sheen. Alas I fear this will be stored a lot more than its used. How should I finish the job for long term storage? 
I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:

Replies

  • HappySquidHappySquid Member Posts: 408 Member
    You should start with pics of your results !!!   :wink:
  • sakodudesakodude Senior Member Posts: 4,170 Senior Member
    And then present your nephew a bill for your services in which you will take the firearms in leu of cash.
    Storage problem solved :#
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,856 Senior Member
    Good gun oil, a silicon sock and dehumidification. Along with a tutorial about taking care of stuff.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,934 Senior Member
    Holy smoke that was easy! I wish my photos were better and that I had taken before pics. This is the second I refurbished for my Nephew in Tenn. The first was a Mossberg 500. It started life with a plastic stock and a Bubba shaker can camo job. I bought a ratty walnut stock and used the same procedures on it. 

    This 22 was found with another That I called Rodney, Bubba's dragon gun. Pics and post are comming.

    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,496 Senior Member
    Wow, you did an awesome job.
    Are you sure you want to give it back?
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,934 Senior Member
    edited October 2020 #7
    Diver43 said:
    Wow, you did an awesome job.
    Are you sure you want to give it back?
    It really doesn't bother me, I love resurrecting old guns. I have repaired and given so many away. I remember a laminated SKS that I wanted sooo bad! The stock glittered red and gold in the sun and an Enfield  that had the most beautiful burl the butt stock. This is just a nice old 22. I do appreciate Permalyn! So much easier than BLO or Formby's. And Oxphoblue has it hands down over Dicropan, 44-40 and other cold blues I've tried. 

    I gave this nephew his first 22, a Romanian 1969 training rifle that I also have for some repair. He wanted it refinished but I won't, it's a nice period correct rifle. I'll replace the bolt body and add a cleaning kit and leather sling to make it complete.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • HappySquidHappySquid Member Posts: 408 Member
    Great job and pics :)
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,934 Senior Member
    Back to the OP,  What should I use to protect this old gun for long term storage?
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • MichakavMichakav Senior Member Posts: 2,856 Senior Member
    edited October 2020 #10
    Cosmoline.

    Or as I suggested above.....Good gun oil, a silicon sock and dehumidification (desiccant sack). Along with a tutorial about taking care of stuff.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,934 Senior Member
    NO!  I've cleaned too many guns soaked in cosmoline, No! I'm pondering auto polish
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
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