Home Main Category General Firearms

Hornady Case Sizing Wax

Diver43Diver43 Senior MemberPosts: 11,594 Senior Member
When looking for case lube, it was all that was available.  It works fine. But it stinks. Do they all smell so bad?
If not what is easier on the nose? 
Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5

Replies

  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 25,465 Senior Member
    Imperial
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,236 Senior Member
    I use Wire Aid.  It's cheap and works very well, dries off and easy to remove.  It's basically lanolin.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,225 Senior Member
    I have been using this product for at least a year, and probably have another three years supply left.

    I can't say that I've noticed any exceptionally odor, bad or otherwise.. 
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,594 Senior Member
    41magnut said:
    I have been using this product for at least a year, and probably have another three years supply left.

    I can't say that I've noticed any exceptionally odor, bad or otherwise.. 
    What do you use?
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,529 Senior Member
    Another vote for Imperial
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • ilove22silove22s Senior Member Posts: 1,465 Senior Member
    i like to try various things so that "I" know for myself.  OPO are great, but sometimes they have a different endgame/motive.

    Ive used the RCBS lube on a ink pad, Lee stuff in a tube.  they all work as advertised.  Some are more of a PIA to remove than others.

    I accidentally bought a case of dillons lube/polish combo so i was using/giving that away.   the Lube is half? lanolin.   

    I also got some Imperial stuff too.  i was making some loads for a friend in 300 WM.  but the cases were not chambering fully so i got a special collet die and they recommended imperial.

    Its easy to use and i just wiped it off when i was done.

    i dont remember much of a smell with others but you dont know.

    have fun.
    The ears never lie.

    - Don Burt
  • wddodgewddodge Senior Member Posts: 1,138 Senior Member
    The best I've used is Imperial. It may not be a fast as the aerosol brands but it works much better.

    Denny
    Participating in a gun buy back program because you think that criminals have too many guns is like having yourself castrated because you think your neighbors have too many kids.... Clint Eastwood
  • 41magnut41magnut Senior Member Posts: 1,225 Senior Member
    Once upon a time, I tried generic cooking spray as suggested by some friends. These guys are high volume pistol shooters, using one of the upper end Dillon progressive presses. They swear by the stuff.
     
    Cases were slicker then a new born puppy. 
    One thing for sure and for certain, I didn't have to worry about a stuck case.
    I did have to size the neck at least twice on numerous cases. I dropped 75-80% of the cases and had to fix a dink in the neck. 
    Decided it was a bigger pain in the rumpus, than an advantage, for the reloading I was doing.

    It was cheap and effective, in a pinch when you're out of your first choice it will work.  
    "The .30-06 is never a mistake." Townsend Whelen :iwo:
  • Uncle FesterUncle Fester Senior Member Posts: 1,456 Senior Member
    I made my own case lube from lanolin and Heet (pure alcohol) from the auto parts store. 

  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 7,704 Senior Member
    Another vote for Imperial
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,594 Senior Member
    Seems like a lot of folks like Imperial including those not on the forum
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,205 Senior Member
    I've never been able to find Imperial, seems it's always out of stock. I like to use Hornady spray lube for reloading straight wall cases, like the .38-55 and .45-70. Then I've been using Hornady one shot paste lube in the small can, (looks like a snuff can) for bottle neck cases.
  • tennmiketennmike Senior Member Posts: 27,457 Senior Member
    Imperial is the standard to shoot for. If you're between a rock and a hard place then Vaseline on a rag is good. Just rub a gob in the shop cloth and roll the cases over it. A nylon bore brush with some Vaseline on it is good for doing inside neck lubing for sizing. Then dump the cases in the vibratory case cleaner for 30 minutes to clean, and load 'em up.
      I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that I don't know the answer”
    ― Douglas Adams
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Posts: 2,789 Senior Member
    I am almost through my third tin of Imperial Wax in the last 10 years or so.  When I bought my first one I thought it would last one day less than forever. My last order was for 3 of them, just to be sure I can find some when I run out.  I only dip in the can every 3 or 4 cases but I coat all of them.  Never had a problem.
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,594 Senior Member
    Big Al1 said:
    I've never been able to find Imperial, seems it's always out of stock. I like to use Hornady spray lube for reloading straight wall cases, like the .38-55 and .45-70. Then I've been using Hornady one shot paste lube in the small can, (looks like a snuff can) for bottle neck cases.
    I hope the spray smells better than the paste I got 
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • N454casullN454casull Member Posts: 640 Senior Member
    I made my own case lube from lanolin and Heet (pure alcohol) from the auto parts store. 

    I did this as well. 
  • kansashunterkansashunter Senior Member Posts: 1,896 Senior Member
    I use imperial on the outside and powdered graphite on the inside. 
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,594 Senior Member
    I have sime Imperial on the way.  The Hornady works fin, I just really dislike the way it smells 
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Posts: 2,789 Senior Member
    I use imperial on the outside and powdered graphite on the inside. 
    Why do you use powdered graphite on the inside?  Do you anneal?
  • PFDPFD Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    Diver43 said:
    I have sime Imperial on the way.  The Hornady works fin, I just really dislike the way it smells 
    Don't throw it away.
    If I recall, mine says it can also be used to waterproof your boots. 😁
    That's all I got.

    Paul
  • kansashunterkansashunter Senior Member Posts: 1,896 Senior Member
    I had an expander get stuck and I talked to Hornady and they sent me a new one and suggested to use graphite. Maybe it is not necessary but I have used it since. 
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Posts: 2,789 Senior Member
    I had an expander get stuck and I talked to Hornady and they sent me a new one and suggested to use graphite. Maybe it is not necessary but I have used it since. 
    Understood.  Let me share a few thoughts here and if it's all stuff you already know and have eliminated, please ignore my post.

    I suspect that you are not using bushing dies but instead you are using normal sizing dies  The principle of operation of these dies is to resize the neck enough to reduce it for the thickest brass that is ordinarily available. This means that for some brass, the neck is resized far beyond what is really needed, thus overworking the brass.

    The expander ball's purpose is to pop the neck back up to an ID that will accommodate a bullet during the seating operation and not have the neck buckle under pressure.  An expander ball should have its diameter about .002 under the bullet diameter.  So for a .30 caliber bullet, with a .308 OD, the expander ball should be about .306.  This will provide a neck tension of around .002 to .003 or so.

    The fact you got an expander ball stuck indicates to me that your expander ball may be too large, the brass you are using is thicker than usual or a combination of both.  If that's the case, then graphite away, but I would look closely at that expander ball and do some measuring.

    I use a bushing die with the bushing ID specific to the brand of brass I may be using.  More recently, I have further reduced the ID for the Lapua brass to increase my neck tension from .002 to .004.  I find that my SD further reduced into the middle to low single digit with more neck tension.  Be aware that I am seating bullets with a long boattail.  I have long ago removed all expander balls from my bushing sizing dies.  Loading flat-base bullets with that much neck tension would not be "a good thing."  But I only load BT bullets in my match rifles.
  • kansashunterkansashunter Senior Member Posts: 1,896 Senior Member
    Yes I was and still do use a sizing die. This was the first time I had loaded used brass and had not loaded very much, maybe 20 rounds or so, so in hindsight I wondered if the brass was not clean or a burr on the ball. When it broke Hornady sent me a new pin and expander but since then I have always used the graphite. Maybe I don't need to but now it's just habit but I have never had trouble since. If I ever get my 308 finished I will have to try what you are talking about but I will have to acquire some better tools to measure it. 
  • PegasusPegasus Senior Member Posts: 2,789 Senior Member
    That makes very good sense; why change something that works well for you?

    Hornady does have a good reputation for customer service, and interestingly enough, I find that to be the same for all companies that sell handloading tools, even when the user is at fault.  

    I've experienced great service from Redding, RCBS, Hornady, and Forster.  I've pretty much standardized on Redding for press and dies and such.
  • bullsi1911bullsi1911 Moderator Posts: 11,540 Senior Member

    Hornady does have a good reputation for customer service, and interestingly enough, I find that to be the same for all companies that sell handloading tools, even when the user is at fault.  


    This is very true.  I have had great service from Lee, and a buddy of mine bought a bin full of parts that was about 2 and a half Dillon progressive presses.  Dillon spent a whole hell of a lot of time working with him to get one put together, one swapped out for a current model for almost no charge, and the parts for the third.  

    Most industries could learn a lot about CS from the reloading industry.
    To make something simple is a thousand times more difficult than to make something complex.
    -Mikhail Kalashnikov
  • gunner81gunner81 Member Posts: 513 Senior Member
    I agree 100% on Hornaday CS I had a couple issues on my progressive press and I sent it back they fixed it and it Broke again and they sent me a new press
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement