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Talk to me about the Remington 710

FreezerFreezer Senior MemberPosts: 1,932 Senior Member
My neighbor was given a Remington 710 chambered in 30-06. After some quick research I discovered the recall and this is not one of them. It seams like a bargain basement rifle with a ill fitting plastic stock. The bolt comes out of the gun when racking a new round into battery, The stock has a crack where the bolt release is. I suspect without having taken it apart that the stock holds the bolt release in place. 

What can you tell me about this rifle and is it worth trying to repair this stock. It didn't have a long production run. The stock seams ill fit and is tight to the barrel. I'll be playing with it over the next few months. Any and all info you can give me is greatly appreciated, I'm going to try to repair and improve this rifle for a broke butt neighbor with four young daughters.
I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
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Replies

  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,808 Senior Member
    Isn't that the one with the pressed in barrel?

    The production run was short, partly because of Rem's impending  bankruptcy but mainly because, IMO, they were JUNK from the get go
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    Not sure on the pressed barrel but from what I've seen of the rifle I'm not impressed. I just want to make it acceptable for my neighbor. iI has the Bushnell scope.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,833 Senior Member
    A dremel tool  and epoxy will be the stock fix. I would bet the bolt stop is sheered off. Or missing the spring...... 
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,555 Senior Member
    They fall into the heading of "the free .30-06 that you have is better than the expensive .30-06 that you don't.  As you've already figured out, they're cheap rifles.  Remington's goal that the time was an attempt to compete with the Savage 110 line, and the hard truth is that for a cheap rifle, Savage had them solidly beat.  There was a bit of a reputation for breakage at the time (bolt handles and shrouds, IIRC), but mostly the reaction was "DEAR LORD THOSE ARE CHEESY!"  Folks who gave them a fair shake typically indicated the accuracy was perfectly serviceable.   Part of it's difficulties likely came from being sold as a combo package with low grade scopes and mounts assembled by low skill / low interest department store labor, sometimes making it hard to say where the flaws really lay.

    For giggles, I scrolled down the parts list for them at Numrich - - not a heck of a lot left to keep them going in that warehouse at least.  By physical appearance anyway, it looks like it shares at least some parts with the 700 - so maybe at least some of the parts have a bigger pool out there to scrounge from.

    If you can do a decent bedding job around whatever the rifle uses for a recoil lug, that should relieve any forces that might have caused the stock crack, and that can become more of a cosmetic, rather than structural repair.  I like to open up action screw holes enough to fill around the screws with bedding compound, making epoxy pillars that keep the torque on the screws from compressing  crap stock material.  Grease the screws and holes heavily before doing this, then run a slightly larger diameter drill through the hole after the bedding has set so its only the recoil lug taking recoil.  As flexy as I remember the stocks being, I'd probably float the barrel.

    Aside from paying extra attention to good lube on the locking lugs and camming surfaces to prolong what longevity it has, and doing a complete re-mount of the optics hardware to make sure it's right, that's probably all the lipstick those pigs are worth.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    Lips stick on a pig, that's what I felt about this rifle. I'd never seen one before and my first impression was what a piece of crap. There's no gap between the barrel and stock and I have no idea with out tearing it down why the stock has a crack at the bolt release of all places. I think my Dremel tool is going to get a work out.  I plan to start working on it  two weeks from now. As for longevity, this gun will never wear out. I think Bubba bought it new because he bought into the thought "It's a Remington and it's cheap." I doubt there's a box of rounds through it and it has the original Bushnell scope on it. It's only taken out for deer season as evidenced by the light surface rust in some of the crevasses. Now bubba's broke butt boy has it. What can I say I love a challenge.

    I still have the TC Hawken kit to start. I bought new files and layout die, I have my workmate bench ready but I need the weather to change. After moving to Pa I lost my man cave and need to work in the patio if I'm working metal. My wife would kill me if a scattered metal shavings in the  living room. In addition to that I cut up an old saw blade at work to make a knife to match the period if the rifle.

    Thanks for the help!
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • ojrojr Senior Member Posts: 1,151 Senior Member
     :'( 
    The flight was uneventful, which is what one wants when one is transporting an Elephant.
     Reuters, Dec 2020.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,555 Senior Member
    One caveat on the whole "free floated barrel" thing - Remington intentionally cut the stocks on their 700 sporters to put some light upward pressure on the barrels at the forend tip.  This pretty much mimics what the Brits did on the Lee Enfield family to get repeatable accuracy out of lighter weight barrels. They have a reputation for NOT shooting well when you take that away.

    Might be some sense in stabilizing the break, bedding the action, and see how it shoots with the OEM barrel channel before you hog it out.  You could always float it and restore the contact if it doesn't do better that way.

    That of course is if you savor the challenge.  Sounds like it's unlikely to be going to a better than 2 MOA shooter, so putting in the time to make it a better than 2 MOA rifle would be more for the thrill of the chase, IMO.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 25,137 Senior Member
    Every Remington 700 Sporter barrel that I free floated has shot better than before it was floated. 

    Just say’n. 

    Your mileage or reading, may vary. 
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • GunNutGunNut Posts: 7,284 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    Every Remington 700 Sporter barrel that I free floated has shot better than before it was floated. 

    Just say’n. 

    Your mileage or reading, may vary. 
    That has been my experience too.
    Old West Saying: God created men, but Col. Sam Colt made them equal.

    General George Patton:  “Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack.”

  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 11,478 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    Every Remington 700 Sporter barrel that I free floated has shot better than before it was floated. 

    Just say’n. 

    Your mileage or reading, may vary. 
    I purchased an inexpensive Remington 700 ADL in .223 from a fellow forum member a while back.
    All I did was clean it, put a decent Vortex scope on it and went to the range.  It shot straight but way high.
    After cleaning again, I removed the stock, thought about swapping it and noticed there was a small area putting pressure on the barrel.  A little sandpaper lowered that small high spot and after putting things back together I took a trip to the range.  Fired 4 rounds at 50 yards and wow low but right on the money after just bore sighting.  Moved out to 100 yards and my inexpensive with a decent scope and I had a tack driver.  Unfortunately I do not have a range to see what it will do at 300, but that is changing soon.

    Float the barrel and see what happens
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • shotgunshooter3shotgunshooter3 Senior Member Posts: 5,855 Senior Member
    My R700 7mm08 was finicky with the factory (pressure point) stock. I dropped it into a Bell and Carlson free floating stock w/ bedding block and now it'll shoot any ammo I try under an inch effortlessly.

    Float the barrel. Worst case you can build the pressure point back in with super glue and slices of business cards.
    - I am a rifleman with a poorly chosen screen name. -
    "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast, and speed is the economy of motion" - Scott Jedlinski
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    edited April 1 #13
    After I take it apart, figure out why it cracked at the bolt release lever, why the blot comes out when racking a round and do those repairs (JB Weld plastic epoxy). I wouldn't mind bedding and floating and checking the base and rings but that is as far as I'm going. I love tinkering on guns but there's no money involved here and he hasn't invited to a hunt. This is a gratis job and hope it will lead to some hunting opportunities. 

    As for the stock this doesn't appear to be a pressure point thing, the stock on the left appears to ride on the barrel all the way from the receiver to the end. Just a poor fitting stock. Maybe bubby had it apart and didn't put things together correctly?

    Just not the kind of gun I would expect from Remington. This must have been the beginning of their end.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • bellcatbellcat Senior Member Posts: 1,943 Senior Member
    My ex bought me a 710 in 2003 for a wedding present. I’m not sure what happened but it’s been a dependable tack driver with hand loads. (270....sorry guys...and yes, we’re divorced 🤣) I took the cheap scope off and mounted a Burris 3x9.

    The stock rides the barrel, no doubt. For the most part, they’re a piece of junk. A poor effort by Remington to try to compete with Savage. But....I got a good one that’s weathered multiple west River deer hunts and being the ugly kid amongst the beautiful rifles. 

    I used to loan it to a guy who treated guns like a baby treats a diaper. He’d bring it back with surface rust, diarrhea and a high fever. But...with a little TLC it would always come back around to its ugly self. And always still zeroed!

    So....I’d look for a replacement stock before I did anything else. Good luck...let us know how it goes. Mine is currently getting the &@$” kicked out it by 2 M70s in the back of the vault.
    "Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." Mark Twain
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 25,137 Senior Member
    Best sales pitch ever!  👆🏻
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    Ok, I took it apart this afternoon. First this is a cheap rifle.! The stock fits tight all over there are no gaps in anything. The crack in the stock was caused by two problems, first the stock is too tight at the bolt release lever. After removing the action from the stock I had to look for the crack that is obvious with the action in. The second is when the bolt is brought to the rear the bolt release lever is pushed out against the stock opening the crack wider and permitting the bolt to come out of the the action. I have a hard time believing the the stock should help support the bolt release lever and spring. the bold release lever is slightly deformed (buggered) and with the action out of the stock when pulling the bold ack it pushes on the bolt retaining spring, the small detent on the bolt release lever leaves it's place and the bolt release lever moves rearward and down. 

    The stock will be easy to modify and repair, the bolt retention will not. BTW aftermarket stocks are available.

    I believe this small amount of damage to the bolt release lever is the main problem and the metal appears to be too soft (bad design) The spring doesn't have, IMHO, enough tension on the lever. I searched for an hour for a new bolt release lever  but found nothing in stock. Now what? What would it cost to have one made?
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,833 Senior Member
    Freezer said:
    Ok, I took it apart this afternoon. First this is a cheap rifle.! The stock fits tight all over there are no gaps in anything. The crack in the stock was caused by two problems, first the stock is too tight at the bolt release lever. After removing the action from the stock I had to look for the crack that is obvious with the action in. The second is when the bolt is brought to the rear the bolt release lever is pushed out against the stock opening the crack wider and permitting the bolt to come out of the the action. I have a hard time believing the the stock should help support the bolt release lever and spring. the bold release lever is slightly deformed (buggered) and with the action out of the stock when pulling the bold ack it pushes on the bolt retaining spring, the small detent on the bolt release lever leaves it's place and the bolt release lever moves rearward and down. 

    The stock will be easy to modify and repair, the bolt retention will not. BTW aftermarket stocks are available.

    I believe this small amount of damage to the bolt release lever is the main problem and the metal appears to be too soft (bad design) The spring doesn't have, IMHO, enough tension on the lever. I searched for an hour for a new bolt release lever  but found nothing in stock. Now what? What would it cost to have one made?
    Since this is a bubba rifle anyway could you make a set screw through the stock reinforced by epoxy that would act like a bolt stop? Use a hardened bolt/screw. Make a plate on the outside to support it? Just thinking aloud. 
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    edited April 3 #18
    The rifle hasn't been Buba'd it's Bubba's cheap rifle, Remington's poor attempt to compete with Savage. If your not into guns you wouldn't see all it's faults. The stock fits like a spandex body suit. (Bubba is into spandex). The scope is the original Cheap Bushnell 3x9.  Some Remington 710s had a recall for a bad trigger but this one is not one of them or its been changed. The trigger is a heavy has some creep but when Bubba throws it to his shoulder and "pulls" the trigger it will work. All in all a minute of deer gun at 200 yards I'd guess. 

    I'm actually considering using a Dremel tool and Exacto Knife to open a small area on the inside of the stock to install a steel support if a find out the stock is supposed to hold the bolt release in place. I just find that concept hard to believe. If it doesn't add support a little JB Weld plastic epoxy will solve the problem. 

    The bolt release has a round side that enters the receiver  and the end looks like a slotted screwdriver. On the inside (receiver side) of the lever there is a small dimple that indexed the lever with a hole in the receiver. There is a spring steel spring attached to the trigger that holds the bold release in place and maintains pressure so the bolt release lever and be turned. When I took the stock off the rifle the crack disappeared. When I reinstall it, it opens the crack. When I move the bolt release it opens more. with or without the action in the rifle when the bolt is moved rearward the bolt comes out of the action. That's why I believe the problem lies in the bold release and bolt release spring. I looked at Wolff spring but they don't list anything. I look at two dozen parts sites for these parts with no luck. I could send the spring to Wolff and have one made but I'm not sure that will solve my problem. 

    I'll have to take this POS apart and take some pictures.

    Remington 710 Parts Diagram - Bing images Parts 26 &28
    Remington 710 Bolt Stop - Bing images
    Remington 710 Bolt Stop - Bing images


    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,833 Senior Member
    I like your fixed  steel block idea. Bore snakes are and easy was to “clean” the bore. 
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,555 Senior Member
    You remember the opening scenes of Enemy at the Gates when the unarmed Vassili Zaitzev is steeling himsel to charge the German front line, muttering "I need a rifle. . .I need a rifle. . ."?

    If you handed him a 710 in that same situation, he'd probably take one look and say "I need a RIFLE. . .I need a RIFLE :D "

    I'll put up with a lot, but a bolt stop that doesn't  won't fly.  I'm trying to fully envision the interaction of the parts from the online pics and diagram.  If a full complement of new parts cannot be acquired, might there be some sense in trying to tweak things so that the bolt stop is held in the "locked" position while the receiver is in the stock, and it can only be unlocked by removal from the stock?  Cleaning via boresnake or full disassembly is less than ideal, but it beats a bolt flying out every time you work it.

    Elk Creek's idea of a screw is not a bad one - provided you can find a decent way to anchor it that will handle the impact of the bolt at the back of the stroke.  The earliest bolt actions did this (i.e. Chassepot and 1871 Mauser) and it worked, but they at least had that in mind when they started milling. . .

    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,137 Senior Member
    The Lee Enfield No 4 had a spring in the fore end to put upward pressure on the barrel.  You could apply hand pressure to the muzzle end of the barrel and it would give about 1/4" or so.  Then "wartime expedient" took control and the stocks were inlet to do away with this feature.  The barrel on a No 4 was heavier than a No 1, which helped some. 

    So if you ever buy a No 4, check to see if you can depress the muzzle a bit with hand pressure.  The ones made in Canada and the two position rear sight rifles do not have this feature.  I don't know how they're bedded except they were a wartime contingency.  I suppose the No 4s made after the war were bedded correctly.  Squeeze the muzzle of the rifle; if it depresses, it's bedded correctly.  Since few dealers know this, you can refer to it as a "loose muzzle" and maybe get a couple of bucks discount.

    So a bit of upward pressure can be helpful in some cases.  Especially if the rest of the barrel is floated, like the SMLE and the No 4s.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,555 Senior Member
    Close.  SMLE's had the spring saddle; the No.4 accomplished the same thing cheaper by playing with the geometry of the wood - as did Remington.

    Sounds like the 710 inletting is more "horrendous job" across the board.  A full free float would at least let Bubba get an oily patch around the full circumference of the "Rusts if you look at it cross-eyed" bluing they made infamous on the 870 Express.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    edited April 4 #23
    I took it apart again this morning. There is some wear in the mag stop. Just enough to cause some problems but not the entire problem. The stock does limit the movement of the Mag release and spring. With the action out and pressure in the mag release and spring it holds. With the action in the stock and pressure on the stock crack the mag release holds. What a POS! There's not a lot of plastic to work with and there is some detail in the way the interior of the stock was molded including a 1/4 " long 1/16" wide vertical line that was supposed to add support to the Mag spring. This is where the crack is. This will take some thought and words with Bubba Jr. Elk Creek's idea of a steel reinforcing plate on the outside might be the best fix....or a new laminated stock.

    The only good thing I can say about this stock is there is a steel pillar between the two main stock screws.

    The best pics of the bolt stop and spring are on the second line of the web site I posted. The spring is held in place at the top of the trigger by a screw and curves up to hold be bolt stop lever in place against the receiver. The problem with the design is it can give too much and the thin protruding line from the stock was meant to prevent excess movement. The pressure was too great, fit the poor and it cracked the stock.

    I need to think about this some more!

    Any Idea where I can get a bolt stop?
    How much would it cost to have one made? 

    I need to contact Wolff spring to see what a new stronger leaf spring will cost!

    What a POS!
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    PS. The weather is improving and I'll be working on a quality rifle soon! The TC Hawken Kit! I plan on making a period correct knife to match and maybe a deer skin scabbard and sheath. 
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,555 Senior Member

    As this saga unfolds, I'm not sure:

    1. if I'm touched that you're doing your buddy a solid by keeping him in a deer rifle

    2.  if I'm intrigued at the notion of seeing what can be done to keep a "Yugo" on the road.

    3. if keeping a "Yugo" on the road is really in ANYONE'S interests.  :D

    Somebody needs to keep one in a museum on the same stand as a Remington Rolling Block and a Remington Hepburn.  Kind of a "Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire" sort of thing. . .
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,833 Senior Member
    Bigslug said:

    As this saga unfolds, I'm not sure:

    1. if I'm touched that you're doing your buddy a solid by keeping him in a deer rifle

    2.  if I'm intrigued at the notion of seeing what can be done to keep a "Yugo" on the road.

    3. if keeping a "Yugo" on the road is really in ANYONE'S interests.  :D

    Somebody needs to keep one in a museum on the same stand as a Remington Rolling Block and a Remington Hepburn.  Kind of a "Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire" sort of thing. . .
    Well said. But buying a stock for that rifle would be a waste of whatever you spent. I knew a guy in Wyoming that had an old OLD mauser that the bolt stop release was missing. It was a hunting rifle for him. He hinted with it for years before he bought a “new Winchester” pre 64 30-06 that had about 2% original finish left. I asked about the bolt coming out when ejecting then spent round. He said “if I had to take a second shot I had to pay attention, but it worked fine. 🤣😂
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
  • zorbazorba Senior Member Posts: 24,295 Senior Member
    HEY! I liked the Yugo!
    -Zorba, "The Veiled Male"

    "If you get it and didn't work for it, someone else worked for it and didn't get it..."
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,932 Senior Member
    I found a stock for $35 shipped but after another hour of searching still can't find the bolt release. Companies that show it in stock don't have it.
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,137 Senior Member
    zorba said:
    HEY! I liked the Yugo!

    When I live in NC, they were offering a buy one, get one free as Yugo was going out of business.  Fact.  Maybe they'll give a Rem 710 the same treatment.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 8,555 Senior Member
    My outsider's understanding of the Baja 1000 off-road race is that despite all the modern, high-end, big-maker, race-division vehicles, they still have a category for people who want to run it "Original Style" with a minimal-modifications-allowed original VW Beetle.

    I think this Remington 710 is a similar exercise:  You have a thousand miles of rugged terrain to cross, and a VW Beetle is all you have to do it with.  What do you do to a VW Beetle to get it across a thousand miles of rugged terrain (and loading it onto a C-17 is not an option) ?  I fear the 710 may indeed be more Yugo than Beetle, but it does provide room for nobility in the attempt.

    The big difference with going Baja in a Bug is that it doesn't place a 50,000+PSI cartridge next to your head.  I guess Remington figured that if only the locking lugs held, and EVERYTHING ELSE failed, they were still making money on the deal.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Elk creekElk creek Senior Member Posts: 6,833 Senior Member
    Ok I’ve been thinking. Take the mortise the bolt stop should have and make it a 5/8’s square the as deep as you think you can and still have the outside of the stock stable. Shape a piece of aluminum to fit the hole. Drill and tap the hole for 1/4 28 or whatever seems appropriate. Fit the head of the (hex head, or toed) screw to be just proud of the stock have the tip of the screw be the bolt stop.  Try to find a nice flat place to use the as the bolt stop. If its common then any hardware store will have one. I would harden it once you get it final shaped. Some things just need to be fixed. And not with original parts per say.... 
    Aim higher, or get a bigger gun.
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