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Firearms trivia thread.

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  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,936 Senior Member
    ....aaaaand probably the worst smokeless powder ever made for a service rifle. Made out of a necked-down 11mm. Gras case, was needlessly big & heavy and difficult to use in LMGs. Understandable as a "first" but can't understand why the French army didn't adopt the excellent 7.65 x 53mm. Belgian Mauser round, to replace ASAP the 8mm. Lebel, when it was developed just a few years later for the FN 1889, specially considering that it was pretty obvious that them and the Belgians shared a common potential threat like the Germans and logistically it would have been a sound decision.
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,988 Senior Member
    edited June 6 #1083
    Nice! I did a little research and found your answer very interesting and correct but, the Mauser wasn't any more scratch resistant than the 1886 Lebel. That's why they stayed with their own.  If your going to waist money on a rifle they'll never shoot, keep the money in country. 

     Makes sense to me  ;)
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • FreezerFreezer Senior Member Posts: 1,988 Senior Member
    I like Elmer Keith; I married his daughter :wink:
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,569 Senior Member
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,936 Senior Member
    Problem with France at leasat regarding their service rifles was that they were always looking for the most modern one they could issue but ended up being stuck with the rifle they had and trying to replace it with another one that in the end was still rather subpar to what others had and MAYBE only a tad better that what they previously had, and that involved also the ammo. 

    By late 19th. century and early 20th. they were already testing semiauto prototypes that were usually hindered by the service cartridge they refuse to drop due to logistical reasons. As a stopgap they built the 3-shot bolt action Berthier that was originally intended to replace just the old single-shot cavalry guns, but WWI caught them still using the oldest cartridge/rifle design of all major powers involved (Lebel), issuing as fast as they could a so-so replacement to all infantry units (Berthiers) STILL using the same round, and dropping due to urgency the whole mass-issued semiauto while restricting it to some clumsy, unreliable examples (SRC) using the same outdated ammo.

    20 years later it would happen again. At least this time they have caught the others regarding a more modern round (7.5mm) but still issuing Berthiers, Lebels, and another "spare tire" bolt action, the MAS 36, that although good, was intended to hold in place while another theoretical semiauto was allegedly developed, tested, produced and massively issued......not!! Once again the "Boche" ruined their timetables. 

    Fortunately they eventually learned the lesson. In the late '50s they ended up fielding a completely different rifle than their NATO counterparts in an only similar round the rest of the members have issued, the FAMAS. Finally seems like they're getting HK-made ARs, only after trying for 110 years to do things THEIR way despite everything. 
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,236 Senior Member
    This pistol round from a rifle round.  Why was it developed and what was the parent rifle round.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • PFDPFD Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    .44 Automag?
    Cut down and neck reamed .308 or '06 cases.
    An Acadia Machine and Tool (AMT) was the star of one of the Dirty Harry movies.
    Or not.
    That's all I got.

    Paul
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,236 Senior Member
    yes.  sudden impact
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • Big Al1Big Al1 Senior Member Posts: 8,206 Senior Member
  • PFDPFD Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member
    This may be a softball.
    What was the origin of the name of the Velo Dog revolvers?
    That's all I got.

    Paul
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,529 Senior Member
    It was intended for those riding velocipeds to defend themselves from chasing dogs...
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • PFDPFD Senior Member Posts: 1,553 Senior Member

    10-4!

    Reading the bottom of the ad, what is a book agent and was it legal to shot them?
    I searched for Velo Dog and found a Forehand ad.  Huh.
    That's all I got.

    Paul
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,569 Senior Member
    Now. At least here. You'd be charged with a felony crime and vilified on the local news as a human interest biline.

    I think there were rifles too, that mounted right to the bike frame.
  • AntonioAntonio Senior Member Posts: 2,936 Senior Member
    There were different rounds for those guns: Lead to kill, wood to maim. From what I've heard there were also loaded with sand or small pellets or even stuff like red pepper or such, and might have had the same ballistics as a SV .22LR
    Seems like back in the day (Late 1800s, early 1900s) there were huge rural areas where stray, possibly rabbid dogs roamed at will, and such a clumsy artifact as one of those bikes clanging down the road would have called A LOT of unwanted attention from these feral critters, and since falling from them in a rough terrain could be worse than getting bitten, it seemed as a good defensive tool against the attacking mutts.
     Also animal treatment wasn't as compassioned as nowadays and most dogs weren't precisely pets like their current descendants.

    Years ago among the stuff of a friend's late grandad we found a case full of assorted ammo from all the guns he used to carry and hunt with back in his day (My pal was able to recover a handful of them) and among the OLD boxes there were a couple of apparently French-made .25 lead flat nose VeloDog packs in great condition, 50 rounds each. Sadly the revolver (A folding trigger one according to older relatives) was apparently sold or lost decades before.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,529 Senior Member
    What rate of fire with the British Land Pattern Musket..."Brown Bess" was a British soldier was expected to maintain?
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,569 Senior Member
    Three shots a minute?
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,529 Senior Member
    Three shots a minute?
    Close....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,236 Senior Member
    Four?
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,529 Senior Member
    Gene L said:
    Four?
    There you go...The British military standard for the day was 4 rounds per minute....actually pretty easy to attain considering they were using undersized round balls and paper cartridges...I tried it with my repro "Bess" and a couple of times I managed 6
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,236 Senior Member
    Reading all those Sharps Napoleonic Wars books finally paid off.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,236 Senior Member
    What is the longest confirmed sniper kill ever, and what was the rifle used for it, in what military?
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,981 Senior Member
    McMillian TAC-50, by the Canadian Military, not sure of the range, but was over a mile

    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,529 Senior Member
    knitepoet said:
    McMillian TAC-50, by the Canadian Military, not sure of the range, but was over a mile

    3450 meters....
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,236 Senior Member
    knitepoet said:
    McMillian TAC-50, by the Canadian Military, not sure of the range, but was over a mile


    Over TWO miles.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,981 Senior Member
    Knew it was a "fer piece", couldn't remember the exact details

    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • earlyagainearlyagain Posts: 7,569 Senior Member
    From a smoothbore flintlock to over two miles precision hits..........


  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,529 Senior Member
    Ok...how do we proceed?
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,236 Senior Member
    Whomever can think of a question...I'm at my wits end.
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • knitepoetknitepoet Senior Member Posts: 21,981 Senior Member
    Jayhawker, I yield to you, sir
    Seven Habits of Highly Effective Pirates, Rule #37: There is no “overkill”. There is only “open fire” and “I need to reload”.


  • JayhawkerJayhawker Moderator Posts: 17,529 Senior Member
    Ok...here we go...A 16" Naval Rifle is a "bag gun" A "Super Heavy" 16" projectile weighs 2700 pounds...so..how much does a powder bag weigh and how many of them are the standard charge to boost that projectile down range....

    No googling!
    Sharps Model 1874 - "The rifle that made the west safe for Winchester"
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