Home Main Category Hunting

Combined range and hunt report.

orchidmanorchidman Senior MemberPosts: 8,365 Senior Member
Caution, thread involves holes in paper, holes in dead things and enabling........
Took the Tikka T1X to sight it in a couple of weeks back with Bloodhound. As per usual with my experience with Tikka rifles, it proved to be extremely accurate. Had it on paper with 2 shots at 50m and then moved to the 100m target. After adjustments, it was shooting 1/2" groups with the standard Hornady 17gr loads. I I reset the turrets to 'zero' and then tried the 20gr XTP loads. For some reason I couldnt get it on paper at 100 with those loads........eventually found that I had a brain fart and somehow inadvertently turned a full revolution on the turret. Finally got it back on paper and got it shooting 1/2 groups with that load..
As it was late afternoon, we decide to go try it out on whatever was available. I handed the the rifle to BH and said ' You can blood it".......First up was a Carrier pigeon that lost its head at around 80m. Next up were a pair of Magpies at 75 and 90m, causing BH to exclaim " Its like a Laser!". ( My plan was working)
A couple of rabbits were next, followed by a Pea Hen........and BH progressed to " I gotta get me one of these". ( enabling completed)

We saw 4 rabbits in a group about 400m away and decided to deal to them and stalk in closer. BH handed me the rifle and said "You had better have a shot" Lol. After walking up a parallel gully until we were opposite the rabbits, we cautiously 'poked' our heads over the intervening ridge to find them gone. As we searched for them, BH pointed out a wild cat about 115 metres away sneaking through the Lupins. Dropping prone on the ridge, I sent a 17 grain on its way and ended its life.  Next up was another rabbit over 120m away that lost its head.  Final targets were more peacocks and BH dropped another Pea Hen at around 80m followed in quick succession by this Peacock.......
We figured we had had enough fun for the day and headed home.
The Tikka lived up to its reputation, was extremely accurate,( tweaked the trigger when I got home to drop it to around 2 1/2lb), with the DPT suppressor it was as quiet as an unsuppressed .22 shooting subsonics and was light and easy to carry.
5 days later, BH called in to see me and over a coffee he said he really needed to get a 17HMR.......so I simple gave him the LGS ph number and said "Ring them". They had sold out!! I gave him the number for another shop and 5 minutes later he asked me if I wanted to accompany him to pick up his new rifle that afternoon! ( Dont you love it when a plan comes together  :D)

Fast forward to Sunday........We decided to head up to his block to deal to some more wildlife, including deer and to sight in his 17HMR. My chosen rifles were the 17 and my tikka in 7mm08,( some of you may see where I am going with this),  his were his suppressed 300 Blackout and his 17.....Weather was crappy with strong winds and heavy rain. After settling in at the 'Hut' and a quick hot drink accompanied by conversations around the efficiency of the 17HMR we split up and headed out to chase deer, BH with his Blackout,..................and me with the 17HMR loaded with 20grXTP's!
After scrambling up a steep muddy slippery ridge I cautiously poked my head over the top to see what was around........Hmm, no deer so I crested the ridge and followed it. After 4 -5 steps I saw a white object about 140m away in the tall pines. A closer look through the scope showed a very bedraggled yearling Fallow taking shelter. By using the bigger pines for cover I started closing the gap and managed to take these 2 pics with my ph on my way in.....( apologies for the crappy pics, I had to zoom in to get them)

Got to within 80m when I was 'sprung' by a mature doe that 'coughed' a warning and then I watched as 14 deer broke out of the brush behind the white yearling ( which was a spiker btw) and they headed away from me and down towards the creek. They didnt seem too alarmed, so I followed at a leisurely pace. 40 minutes later I approached the creek cautiously ( the wind had dropped considerably by now) and sure enough, spied the same group of deer  feeding about 150m away on the other side. I watched them for about 10 minutes while I planned my stalk and saw that they were skittish.....then set off.
20 minutes later by walking from tree to tree after waiting for their heads to go down to feed I was within the self imposed range I had set of around 70m-80m. The problem I had was that they were milling around in one big group and as the mature does were all pregnant I couldnt get a clear shot at any of the yearlings. (We dont normally shoot pregnant Does at this time of the year). I watched the 4 yearlings 3 spikers and a doe) for about 15minutes as they slowly moved along the bank and kept pace with them using whatever cover I had. Could have shot the white spiker a couple of times but figured I would leave him be, which cut down my options by 25%....Finally they settled down a bit and strung out along the bank.......with the yearlings furtherest away at around 90m.....Damn. That meant I had to sneak past parallel to the more alert mature animals to get within my 'comfort' zone. Another 10minutes of adrenaline filled stalking and I found a rest leaning up against a mature Pine. The 3 yearling spikers were just starting to enter some low scrub which ruled them out so I focused on the yearling doe......She stopped just short of the scrub at around 70m away and put her head down while broadside on. I had already decided that a head or top of the neck shot was imperative as the 20gr projectile didnt have the energy to use any other POA......Trouble was that her head was obscured partially by a clump of grass but I had a clear shot at the top of her neck, which I took.........At the shot, her legs crumpled and she dropped on the spot DRT. A few spasmodic reflex kicks caused her to slide down the bank into the swamp while bedlam ensued with the rest of the deer bolting.
Made my way over and dragged her up on the bank. Went to cut her throat and found that the 20gr projectile had hit exactly where I had aimed and had completely shattered the first neck bone below her head..the damage was so complete that her head was only attached to her body by skin.
All the research, planning and ballistic testing on smaller critturs had payed off and I had taken my first deer with the 17HMR!
As it was raining quite heavily I decided to dress her out without taking pics and get her across the creek before it got too difficult.
It was a bit tricky carrying her, my rifle and pack across the creek but I managed it and got back to the hut and hung her from a post, then took these 2 pics....
You can see from the first pic that the neck bone was completely shattered by the 20gr projectile. According to the ballistics, it is moving at over 1700fps at 100yds and carries approx 137fpe......More than enough to drop a medium sized fallow deer with correct shot placement.
Is it going to be my 'go to' deer rifle?
No!
However, it is nice to know that I have confirmation that, under the right conditions and with correct shot placement out to 100m, it will do the job if the opportunity presents itself.

Been reading up on the 10 Eichelberer Dart......Hmmmmm.......
Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....

Replies

  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,296 Senior Member
    Very nice, sounds like a fun day, we are just getting going in MN with deer hunting, sat with the kids over the weekend for their youth hunt, no pictures from me.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Ernie BishopErnie Bishop Senior Member Posts: 8,533 Senior Member
    Good for you!
    The little ones can definitely do the deed with precise shot placement.
    Ernie

    "The Un-Tactical"
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Posts: 3,280 Senior Member
    I’ve always said it’s all about the knowledge and skills of the hunter.  Thanks for cementing that into my brain even further.
    I’m baaaaaaaaack… 😬
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,365 Senior Member
    knitepoet said:
    Nicely done, my friend.

    I wish you'd answer your danged phone once in a while though. :rage:

    I've had the pleasure of walking through the woods around here with Alec, and even on a different continent, his knowledge is impressive and something wonderful to tap in to. I took a couple of his suggestions and improved the amount of traffic to our greenfields quite a bit

    Thanks Paul. The ph system at the house has changed and I cant divert it to my mobile at the moment which means if I am out the back working I dont hear it.... :/
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 12,198 Senior Member
    Great shooting

    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • ZeeZee Senior Member Posts: 27,580 Senior Member
    That’s quite the break in you had for that rifle!  Well done. 
    Man, I still want a Tikka again. Maybe after the first of the year I’ll have it. 

    Question, I often see you cut the legs/head off while leaving the hide on. Head I can understand. Why the legs?
    "To Hell with efficiency, it's performance we want!" - Elmer Keith
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,365 Senior Member
    Zee said:
    That’s quite the break in you had for that rifle!  Well done. 
    Man, I still want a Tikka again. Maybe after the first of the year I’ll have it. 

    Question, I often see you cut the legs/head off while leaving the hide on. Head I can understand. Why the legs?
    Thanks.
    The lowest joint on the legs is just hooves,bone and skin so we leave them behind to save weight on the carry. With Fallow, especially the smaller ones like this, I cut a slit between the tendons and the leg bone after cutting the legs at the first joint. I then use the strap in the pics and feed it through both back legs twice and tie them together then take it forward and  tie both front legs together before looping back to the back legs where I tie it off.  This leaves me with a double strap 'shoulder bag' type arrangement in that I pick the deer up by the strap and put it over my shoulder with the body being the 'bag' hanging  over one hip. Rifle goes over the opposite shoulder to balance the load a bit and I have both hands free.
    Hence the term 'Hand bag deer'........It means I can carry my rifle, pack and deer out in one trip.

    For bigger fallow I can use the 'NZ deer Backpack'...

    The skin stays on the animal and it goes in the chiller with skin on for up to 2 weeks to stop the meat drying out. We monitor the deer in the chiller regularly and once processed, the steaks etc are so tender you can literally cut them with with a fork if cooked right.  And because they are so tender after being in the chiller, we bone out the legs, separate the muscle groups and cut them across the muscle turning them into leg steaks.




    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,296 Senior Member
    That is freaking brilliant, I have never seen that. Probably wont work on a mature whitetail buck or an elk though ;)
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,365 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    That is freaking brilliant, I have never seen that. Probably wont work on a mature whitetail buck or an elk though ;)

    Depending on the size of the deer and the size, age and fitness of the person you could carry a mid sized Whitetail with little difficulty.
    Two things though.
    1. If the deer is headless, you can rest both forearms on the back legs where they stick out the front and with downward pressure it takes some of the strain off the shoulders and keeps the deer more upright.
    2. Drape an orange or yellow fluoro jacket over the deer before 'shouldering' it as you may be mistaken for a deer if visibility is limited due to bush or the environment/weather conditions etc. 
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,296 Senior Member
    orchidman said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    That is freaking brilliant, I have never seen that. Probably wont work on a mature whitetail buck or an elk though ;)

    Depending on the size of the deer and the size, age and fitness of the person you could carry a mid sized Whitetail with little difficulty.
    Two things though.
    1. If the deer is headless, you can rest both forearms on the back legs where they stick out the front and with downward pressure it takes some of the strain off the shoulders and keeps the deer more upright.
    2. Drape an orange or yellow fluoro jacket over the deer before 'shouldering' it as you may be mistaken for a deer if visibility is limited due to bush or the environment/weather conditions etc. 
    The guys I hunt with will be laughing too hard too shoot me :D
    You are correct though, orange is mandatory in MN anyways.
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • Jeff in TXJeff in TX Senior Member Posts: 2,444 Senior Member
    Nicely done.  Love my Tikka's!  I have to honest as I've never ever given this one a thought.  Hunting peacocks is a new one on me!  How do they taste?
    Distance is not an issue, but the wind can make it interesting!

    John 3: 1-21
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,365 Senior Member
    Nicely done.  Love my Tikka's!  I have to honest as I've never ever given this one a thought.  Hunting peacocks is a new one on me!  How do they taste?

    A cross between chicken, turkey and pheasant is how I would describe the taste........
    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Posts: 3,280 Senior Member
    orchidman said:
    Nicely done.  Love my Tikka's!  I have to honest as I've never ever given this one a thought.  Hunting peacocks is a new one on me!  How do they taste?

    A cross between chicken, turkey and pheasant is how I would describe the taste........
    Have you ever cooked one with the skin on?
    I’m baaaaaaaaack… 😬
  • orchidmanorchidman Senior Member Posts: 8,365 Senior Member
    orchidman said:
    Nicely done.  Love my Tikka's!  I have to honest as I've never ever given this one a thought.  Hunting peacocks is a new one on me!  How do they taste?

    A cross between chicken, turkey and pheasant is how I would describe the taste........
    Have you ever cooked one with the skin on?
    Yep. Plucked the bird and then roasted it whole. Had to do it in a roasting bag the second time as it dried out very quickly the first time I tried it. Even then it was still quite dry... 

    Still enjoying the trip of a lifetime and making the best of what I have.....
  • Wambli SkaWambli Ska Posts: 3,280 Senior Member
    Not a lot of fat on wild birds.  Thanks!
    I’m baaaaaaaaack… 😬
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Temporary Price Reduction

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Advertisement