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An original Winchester gallery gun

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  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,465 Senior Member
    And it's cleverly done too - if you run it slowly, you'll notice the hammer doesn't drop until the bolt locks up.  As I recall, the firing pin is blocked until the bolt is in battery, and it wouldn't surprise me if the hammer can't even strike properly until that happens.

    This was the gun that Winchester's engineers looked at the blueprint for and said "We don't think this will work".  A package from Ogden showed up on their door about as fast as the mail could travel in those days with a note that said "This one seems to work just fine". :D  I grant Browning God Status at least as much for his .22's as his pistols and MG's - - SERIOUS brainwork inside those little pumps.

    Anymore, I have to be a bit careful when running my old Winchesters.  I've been teaching 870's with what amounts to Glock trigger follow through and reset for a long time now.  Apply that to a '97, 12, or Ithaca 37 and you will get a nasty surprise! 
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,366 Senior Member
    edited January 22 #33
    Well that's interesting, it WAS fun to send some lead that way at a crow 100 + yds away, not accurate, but the crows reaction was interesting..
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,465 Senior Member
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Well that's interesting, it WAS fun to send some lead that way at a crow 100 + yds away, not accurate, but the crows reaction was interesting..
    I wouldn't do it with one of the Short- or Long-only versions (the ammo comes too dear these days) but one could certainly practice slow closure of the bolt to get the timing of lockup and sight picture right.  And one could probably get pretty good - and fast - at it.

    Other than it being a really cool party trick though, you do have to ask yourself "WHY?"
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • Diver43Diver43 Senior Member Posts: 12,259 Senior Member
    WHY ?  Why not? Because one can? Because it's fun?  If it's all you have and a bad guy comes through your door it's nice to know you can make  22 sized holes all over him.  I am sure there are more and better reasons too.
    Logistics cannot win a war, but its absence or inadequacy can cause defeat. FM100-5
  • Gene LGene L Senior Member Posts: 12,642 Senior Member
    I've wanted a Winchester pump since I was a teenager but couldn't find one I could afford.  I found a Rossi copy I could  afford and now it rests in my safe.  I wonder why the OP rifle was chambered for Long.  For a gallery gun, seems like shorts would be the round to use.  Could lt be the OP was made before the LR was made?
    Concealed carry is for protection, open carry is for attention.
  • BigslugBigslug Senior Member Posts: 9,465 Senior Member
    Think of the .22 Long as a victim of the computer and software "platform wars" of the 1980's and 1990's.

    It was the Tandy TRS-80, Commodore 64, or WordPerfect flash in the pan; the .22LR was the unstoppable IBM PC and Microsoft juggernaut.  It's just hard to see that kind of thing when you're living it.
    WWJMBD?

    "Nothing is safe from stupid." - Zee
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,366 Senior Member
    edited January 22 #38
    Bigslug said:
    CHIRO1989 said:
    Well that's interesting, it WAS fun to send some lead that way at a crow 100 + yds away, not accurate, but the crows reaction was interesting..
    I wouldn't do it with one of the Short- or Long-only versions (the ammo comes too dear these days) but one could certainly practice slow closure of the bolt to get the timing of lockup and sight picture right.  And one could probably get pretty good - and fast - at it.

    Other than it being a really cool party trick though, you do have to ask yourself "WHY?"
    Why? Because how else in the late 70's and early 80's could we pretend we had massive full auto fire power? Maybe with a 10-22, Marlin 60, or a Browning SA-22, but we didn't have one of those, our dads knew how we burned through ammo with bolt action .22's, Daisy's, and Crossmans, we didn't get any semi autos till we were old enough to buy them ourselves
    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • CHIRO1989CHIRO1989 Senior Member Posts: 14,366 Senior Member
    .

    I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn away from their ways and live. Eze 33:11
  • RaftermanRafterman New Member Posts: 363 Member
    So, I picked this up yesterday. Third model. Dates to 1930. 22 long rifle accounted for approximately 10% of the total production of this model and will add 50% to the value according to the Blue Book of Gun Values. It’s in very good original condition just dirty and lacking any lubrication. A few spots of bluing loss also.
  • JunkCollectorJunkCollector Posts: 1,152 Senior Member
    Very Nice Rafterman.
    Mine is the limited edition silver model :smile:
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